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Full text of "Hatfield Annual Town Report"

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HATFIELD 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER, 3 J, J 964 



Printed by 

6azette Printing Co.. Inc. 

Nortrramoton. Mass. 



Town Officers for 1 964 



SELECTMEN 






Stanley J. Filipek, Chairman 
Michael A. Yanginski , George W. Rogalewski 

MODERATOR 

Gordon A. Woodward 

TOWN CLERK - TREASURER 

Peter S. Rogaleski 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Mitchell W. Kempisty, Chairman 
Richard D. Belden Joseph S. Wilkes 



TAX COLLECTOR 

Thomas L. Mullany 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Ethel I. Byrne, Chairman 
Henry F. Kulesza Stanley Sliwoski 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Ralph F. Vollinger, Chairman 
Rupert Harubin John R. Rudy 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Arthur Cory Bardwell, Chairman 
Clifford L. Belden, Jr. Henry F. Szych 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Margaret M. Wentzel, Chairman 
Dorothy Breor Michael M. Majeskey 

ELECTOR UNDER THE WILL OF OLIVER SMITH 

Frank T. Woodward 

TREE WARDEN 

Francis E. Godin 

PLANNING BOARD 

Francis H. Hebert, Chairman 
William H. Burke, Jr. Henry F. Szych 

Martin J. Brassord Stanley Sliwoski 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Fred E. Snook, Chairman 
Chester S. Prucnal William E. Boyle 

Alternates 

Thaddeus Kabat Edward S. Kowalski 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Atty. Elizabeth A. Porada 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

John Osley, Jr. Chairman 
Joseph V. Porada, Jr. William S. Olszewski 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Howard B. Abbott, Chairman 

Joseph J. Pelc Peter S. Rogaleski 

Edward T. Kostek 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Gertrude B. Rogaleski 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

Joseph J. Deres 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS & SLAUGHTER 

Frank Sikorski, Jr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Edward S. Wroblewski 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS 

Charles J. Eberlein, Sr. 

COLLECTOR OF WATER RENTS 

Stanley J. Kugler 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

John A. Skarzynski 

DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Thomas P. Mullins 

WOOD SURVEYORS 

Henry Donnis Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 



6 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Joseph V. Porada Dave Morey 

Edward Molloy Peter Kubosiak 

John Osley, Jr. Elizabeth Porada 

Clifford L. Belden, Jr. 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

George Zgrodnik, Jr. 

FENCE VIEWERS AND FIELD DRIVERS 

Michael M. Majeskey Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Henry J. Sliwoski 

CONSTABLES 

Henry Sliwoski Mitchell Kempisty 

James E. McGrath Peter Kubosiak 

Joseph S. Wilkes Stanley J. Filipek 

Henry Kosakowski John Brennan 

George W. Rogalewski William Podmayer 

Anthony Malinowski Peter Backiel 

Stanley Malinowski George Omasta 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Anthony Sikorski Adolf Ciszewski 

William Symanski Stanley Jagodzinski 

Harry Lizek Robert Thayer 

William Slowikowski Ralph Vollinger 

Stanley Symanski Frank Godek 

David Omasta Thaddeus Kabat 

John Szych 

SPECIAL POLICE 

Joseph Deres 



FIRE CHIEF 

Myron J. Sikorski 



FIREFIGHTERS 

Main Street Station 



Belden, Clifford, Asst. Chief 
Kempisty, Edward, Deputy Chief 
Proulx, Alfred, Deputy Chief 
Boyle, William, Captain 
Belden, Richard, Captain 
Pickunka, Walter, Jr., Lt. 
Kotch, Peter, Lt. 
Shaw, Bernard 
Pelis, Bernard 
Boyle, Marcus 
Gizinski, John 
Rogaleski, John 
Korza, William 



Thayer, Walter 

Lizek, David 

Pickunka, Walter, Sr. 

Shea, Robert 

Sikorski, Frank 

Balise, Kenneth 

Vollinger, Richard 

Petrowicz, Richard 

Petrowicz, Charles 

Vollinger, Donald 

Skorupski, Henry 

Zgrodnik, George 

Brassard, Arthur 



North Hatfield Station 



Smiarowski, Teddy 
Belden, Clifford 
Belden, Richard 
Symanski, Anthony 
Sysun, Connie 



Bielunis, Adam 

Maiewski, Philip 

Kubilis, Louis 

Besko, John, Jr. 

Omasta, Michael 



8 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Incorporated 1670 

AREA 

8900 Acres 

ELEVATION 

132 Feet at Main Street 

POPULATION 

1964 Listing — 2620 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Second Hampshire District 

JOHN D. BARRUS 

Goshen, Mass. 

STATE SENATOR 

Franklin & Hampshire District 

CHARLES A. BISBEE, JR. 

Chesterfield, Mass. 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

First Congressional District 

SILVIO 0. CONTE 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

LEVERETT J. SALTONSTALL 
Dover, Mass. 

EDWARD M. KENNEDY 
Boston, Mass. 



Selectmen's Warrant 



Hampshire, ss. 

To either of the constables of the Town of Hatfield 
in said County, Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to meet in 
Memorial Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 15th 
day of February next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then 
and there to take action under Article 1 and to meet at 
seven o'clock in the evening to take action on all other 
articles : 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for 
the ensuing year: one Selectman for three years; one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years; one 
member of the School Committee for three years; one 
member of the Board of Water Commissioners for three 
years; one member of the Library Trustees for three 
years; Elector under the will of Oliver Smith for one 
year ; one member of the Cemetery Commission for three 
years ; one member of the Planning Board for five years ; 
one member of the Planning Board for one year. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon 
and kept open until eight o'clock in the evening. 

Article 2. To hear and discuss all reports or sub- 
jects which have to do with the welfare of the town, or 
act anything thereon. 




6 



Article 3. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year, beginning- January 1, 1965, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws and 
amendments thereto. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $68.82 received from the Dog Fund to the Li- 
brary Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to appro- 
priate the sum of $587.50 from the State Aid for Li- 
braries account to the Library Account, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer such sums of money as shall 
be deemed necessary to defray the current expenses of 
the financial year and set the salaries of all elected officials 
in accordance with the provisions of Section 108, Chapter 
41, General Laws, or act anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer the sum of $4,299.50 as allocated 
by the actuary and certified by the County Commissioners 
to the Town of Hatfield under the provisions of Chapter 
32, General Laws, as amended, and pay said amount to 
the Treasurer-Custodian of the Hampshire County Re- 
tirement System. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to co-operate with the County and State 
under the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and to 



11 

raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, the town's 
share, for improvement of Chapter 90 highways, and to 
appropriate the sum of $2,000.00, the State and County- 
share, in anticipation of reimbursement from the State 
and County ; the town's share to be raised by taxation and 
the State and County share to be taken from Surplus Rev- 
enue and returned to same when reimbursement is re- 
ceived, or act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to co-operate with the State under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 81, General Laws, and to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $8,500.00, the town's share and to 
appropriate the sum of $13,750.00, the State's Share, in 
anticipation of reimbursement from the State, the town's 
share to be raised by taxation and the State's Share to be 
taken from Surplus Revenue and returned to same when 
reimbursement is received, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to co-operate with the County and State 
under the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $4,750.00, the town's 
share, for new construction on School and Chestnut 
Streets, and to appropriate the sum of $14,250.00, the 
State and County share, in anticipation of reimbursement 
from the State and County, the town's share to be raised 
by taxation and the State and County share to be taken 
from Surplus Revenue and returned to same when reim- 
bursement is received, or act anything thereon. 



Article 11. To see if the town will vote to appro- 
priate from Surplus Revenue a sum of money in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Section 5B of Chapter 40, 
General Laws, and add said sum to the Stabilization Fund. 



12 



Article 12. To see if the town will vote to install 
street lights in locations as follows : 

1. Between the residences of John C. Rankin and 
Thaddeus Kabat on Main Street ; 

2. At the residence of Andrew Adamski and 
Rudolph Yurkevicz on Old Farms Road, Brad- 
street ; 

3. Across the street from the residence of John 
Szych, River Road, Bradstreet ; 

4. At the residence of Cornelius Sysun, Depot Road, 
Bradstreet ; 

5. At the residence of Joseph Baceski, Jr., North 
Street ; 

6. At the residence of Pauline Petcen, Chestnut 
Street ; 

7. At the residence of Paul Duga, Prospect Street. 

(By petitions) 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer the sum of $1,000.00 to continue 
construction of the sidewalk on the old sidewalk bed 
which runs on the easterly side of North Street approxi- 
mately 1000 feet in a Northwesterly direction, or act any- 
thing thereon. (By petition) 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to empower 
the School Building Committee to have such expert as- 
sistance as is necessary to enable such committee to de- 
termine the feasibility of constructing an addition to 
Smith Academy to meet the need for additional classroom 
space and to raise and appropriate or transfer the sum of 
$1,000.00 for such purpose, or take any action relative 
thereto thereon. 



13 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer the sum of $2,500.00 for the com- 
pletion of the basement room at the library to provide ad- 
ditional library facilities for the children of the town, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer a sum of money for the purchase 
of an adding machine for the treasurer's office, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to appro- 
priate from Road Machinery Earnings Fund the sum of 
$11,500.00 for the purchase of a four-wheel drive front- 
end loader, or act anything thereon. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to elect 
three sewer commissioners in the following manner: 

At the next annual town meeting, to elect one 
sewer commissioner for a term of one year ; one 
for a term of two years; and one for a term of 
three years; and at each annual meeting there- 
after to elect one sewer commissioner for a term 
of three years. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer the sum of $200.00 for the use of 
the Youth League, or act anything thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by post- 
ing attested copies thereof in five public places in the 
Town of Hatfield, seven days before time of said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time 
and place of said meeting. 



14 

Given under our hands this 26th day of January in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
sixty-five. 



STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
MICHAEL A. YANGINSKI 
GEORGE W. ROGALEWSKI 

Selectmen of Hatfield 



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20 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Hatfield : 

During the past year it was necessary to fill several 
vacancies, namely, that of the chief of the fire department, 
civil defense director, and a member and alternate of the 
Appeals Board. The position of Gas Inspector was 
created by the annual town meeting and we have ap- 
pointed, subject to state qualification, a person for the 
post. We chose, in our estimation, the best qualified per- 
sons for these posts from a number of applicants. 

Road reconstruction has been greater than in years 
past. Not only was River Road in Bradstreet completed, 
but King Street was started and carried to near half com- 
pletion. Sufficient monies remain to finish this project in 
1965 and appropriation for new construction in the com- 
ing year will be allocated to School and Chestnut Streets, 
Main Street was re-surfaced for approximately one- 
quarter mile from Maple Street going north under Chap- 
ter 90 maintenance, making for a good appearance and a 
softer ride. While reporting on roads, the opening of 
Route 91 thru the town is worthy of historic mention. It 
is too early to assess its impact upon the town until it is 
fully completed to the south, however, for certain there 
will be an impact. 

Building permits issued during 1964 were for pur- 
poses as follows : 



21 



Residential — 10 
Commercial — 6 
Renovation — 9 

While Homebuilding continues to grow, commerce and 
industry still eludes us. It may be timely to review our 
zoning" ordinances. 

Sidewalk work has been completed as authorized by 
town meeting. 

Two special Town Meetings were held during 1964. 
On September 29th, the town took steps to proceed posi- 
tively with two projects which have been hanging fire for 
several years ; namely, that of an added water supply and 
a disposal plant. The water project will be a reality dur- 
ing 1965, and the Water Commissioners should be com- 
mended for having procured a site which promises a 
goodly supply for many years hence. 

A site has been designated for a sewage disposal plant 
and monies appropriated for an appraisal of the parcels to 
be bought or taken by eminent domain proceedings. A 
sum of monies also has been appropriated for engineering 
services in updating the 1960 Engineering Report and sur- 
veying the proposed sewage treatment site. This step 
coupled with an inauguration of the Sewer Use Tax should 
lead to early action in making the treatment plant a reality 
and set the town on a course of providing sewage facilities 
in all parts of the town. 

We would remind all to gradually prepare for the 
town's 300 Anniversary in 1970. Monies should be appro- 
priated over the next five years to lessen the impact of the 
cost of a worthy celebration. 



22 

We wish to express our thanks to all officers and de- 
partments for their co-operation in the conduct of the 
Town's affairs during* 1964. 



STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
MICHAEL A. YANGINSKI 
GEORGE W. ROGALEWSKI 

Selectmen of Hatfield 



List of Jurors 



1965 



Helen Bardwell 
Tofila Bye 
Ethel I. Byrne 
Alex E. Celatka 
John G. Deinlein 
Theodore Doktor 
Anna A. Duga 
Ann B. Filipek 
Francis H. Hebert 
Thaddeus Kabat 
Frank A. Kempisty 
Matthew Klocko 
Anthony Malinowski 
Nicholas Michajluk 
Joseph A. Mieleszko 
Thomas Mullins 
David E. Omasta 
George Omasta 
Alexander T. Rogalewski 
Rose Santoni 
Paul A. Stefancik 
Leona Stempel 
Paul Vachula, Jr. 
Mary Winters 
Clarence Wolfram 
Henry S. Wykowski 
Stanley Ziezulewicz 



Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Salesman 

Retired 

Attendant 

Housewife 

Dental Asst. 

Heating Engr. 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Retired 

Maint. Foreman 

Attendant 

Television Engr. 

Fence Constr. 

Constr. Worker 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Housewife 

Restauranteur 

Clerk 

Constr. Worker 

Housewife 

Appliance Dealer 

Restauranteur 

Farmer 



24 



Treasurers Report 

1964 



Peter S. Rogaleski, Treasurer 



In Account with the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Cash on Hand 


I January 1, 1964 


$204,134.49 


Receipts for 1964: 




January 




$ 22,672.12 


February- 




20,230.53 


March 




37,657.92 


April 




32,651.27 


May 




47,678.33 


June 




51,619.93 


July 




65,713.16 


August 




13,935.30 


September 




56,730.87 


October 




81,833.79 


November 




119,858.26 


December 




85,430.58 



$840,146.55 



Payments per Warrants: 

January 
February 



$ 17,689.78 
53,004.24 



25 



March 43,754.80 

April 52,744.91 

May 36,910.43 

June 36,208.92 

July 53,983.01 

August 38,188.13 

September 74,820.47 

October 67,106.41 

November 40,913.62 

December 81,620.88 



-$596,945.60 



Cash on Hand Decemger 31, 1964 243,200.95 



$840,146.55 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Treasurer 



26 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE AND OTHER FUNDS 





Ceme- 


In- 


With- 


Bal- 




tery 


come 


drawn 


ance 


Hannah W. Smith 


C $ 


20.57 $ 


11.81 $ 


306.39 


J. D. Brown 


c 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Lewis S. Dyer 


c 


3.93 


3.93 


101.00 


Charles H. Waite 


NH 


5.37 


5.37 


137.49 


Charles M. Billings 


C 


9.77 


9.77 


250.00 


James Porter 


C 


4.26 


4.26 


109.51 


Fannie M. Burke 


C 


4.30 


4.30 


110.82 


Chas. S. Shattuck 


C 


4.30 


4.30 


110.63 


Seth W. Kingsley 


C 


4.26 


4.26 


109.45 


Reuben Belden 


B 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Theo Porter 


C 


4.15 


4.15 


106.18 


Charles L. Graves 


C 


4.15 


4.15 


106.22 


Augusta Beals 


C 


8.10 


8.10 


100.00 


B. M. Warner 


C 


8.10 


8.10 


207.42 


Henry Batcheller 


C 


3.95 


3.95 


101.26 


Reuben H. Belden 


B 


3.93 


3.93 


101.00 


Edwin H. Eldridge 


B 


7.83 


7.83 


200.67 


David Wells 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


207.29 


Otis Wells 


C 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Carrie L. Graves 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Harriet S. Marsh 


C 


7.99 


7.99 


204.35 


Clarence E. Belden 


B 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Alfred J. Bonneville 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Roswell Billings 


C 


9.77 


9.77 


250.00 


Houghton-Douglas 


WH 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Susan Zima 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Samuel Osley 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Leon Harris 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Joseph Allen Vining 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Mabel M. Strong 


WH 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Paul Vachula 


NH 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Edward S. Dickinson (New) 


NH 


4.43 


4.43 


150.00 


Luman Crafts (New) 


NH 


3.00 


3.00 


150.00 


Oliver Smith (New) 


C 


2.00 


2.00 


200.00 


E. S. Warner 


C 


6.07 


6.07 


204.53 


William Dougherty 


C 


1.24 


1.24 


251.56 


Scott & Herman Harris 


B 


1.00 


1.00 


200.00 


Mary E. Hubbard 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Anthony Douglas 


C 


2.22 


2 22 


55.24 



27 



Caleb & Edgar Dickinson 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


E. C. Billings C & H 


24.25 


24.25 


620.27 


Hugh McLeod 


c 


3.99 


3.99 


102.92 


Lucius & Stearns Curtis 


c 


9.94 


9.94 


254.28 


H. W. Carl 


c 


3.99 


3.99 


102.73 


J. Franklin Knight 


c 


16.75 


16.75 


428.20 


Silas Hubbard & J. Hastings 


c 


10.91 


10.91 


279.57 


Levi Graves 


c 


6.20 


6.20 


159.00 


Jonathan Graves 


c 


7.97 


7.97 


204.12 


J. E. Porter 


c 


3.99 


3.99 


102.43 


Chester Hastings 


c 


4.03 


4.03 


103.14 


Frary-Gardner 


NH 


3.92 


3.92 


100.57 


Thaddeus & Solomon Graves 


C 


7.87 


7.87 


201.91 


Samuel Field 


B 


5.87 


5.87 


150.53 


Samuel Field 


B 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Alpheus Cowles 


C 


4.19 


4.19 


107.18 


Daniel Allis 


C 


5.95 


5.95 


152.22 


P. M. Wells 


NH 


5.06 


5.06 


129.86 


Benj. Waite 


C 


3.53 


3.53 


90.91 


Joseph D. Billings 


C 


7.91 


7.91 


202.92 


Cooley Dickinson 


NH 


5.06 


5.06 


129.63 


Lemuel B. Field 


C 


4.26 


4.26 


109.18 


Roswell Hubbard 


C 


4.03 


4.03 


103.54 


Abby Dickinson 


C 


3.99 


3.99 


102.57 


Rufus H. Cowles 


C 


4.34 


4.34 


111.44 


Charles E. Hubbard 


C 


4.46 


4.46 


114.30 


Luman M. Moore 


c 


7.83 


7.83 


200.64 


Israel & Lucy Morton 


c 


12.56 


12.56 


321.39 


Elijah Bardwell 


c 


15.70 


15.70 


401.90 


Luther Wells 


NH 


13.30 


13.30 


340.48 


Oliver Warner 


C 


2.04 


2.04 


52.37 


John H. Sanderson 


C 


4.11 


4.11 


105.44 


Charles Smith 


C 


4.26 


4.26 


109.05 


J. H. Howard 


C 


4.19 


4.19 


107.48 


Conrad W. Wolfram 


NH 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Henry R. Holden 


NH 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Fannie Allis 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Charles A. Byrne 


C 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


N. T. Abels 


WH 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Arthur C. Bardwell 


C 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Fred Schepp 


C 


2.93 


2.93 


75.00 


Joseph Schepp 


C 


2.93 


2.93 


75.00 


General Care Fund 


Hill 


29.92 


29.92 


765.29 



28 



John R. Sauergapf 


C 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Lorenzo Cutter 


WH 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Roswell G. Billings 


C 


9.77 


9.77 


250.00 


Charles Wight 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


General Care Fund 


C 


.39 


.39 


10.00 


Stephen Omasta 


NH 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


G. Raymond Billings 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Frederick A. Pease 


C 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Arthur Smith 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Curtis Waite 


WH 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Herman Harris 


B 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Harold J. Morse 


C 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


John W. Darr 


NH 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Adam Englehardt 


NH 


9.77 


9.77 


250.00 


Connie Liebl 


WH 


6.84 


6.84 


175.00 


George Marsh 


B 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


R. M. Woods 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Arthur Hodder 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


John Ondras & Geo. Fusek 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


John Osley, Sr. 


WH 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Susie Yurik 


WH 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


John Bucala 


WH 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


George Strong 


FH 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Lilla Carl Ryan 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


H. W. Dickinson 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Martin Zapka 


WH 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Yura Fusek 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


C. Mabel Barton 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


John Podmayer 


WH 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


John Zapka 


WH 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


John A. Billings 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Reuben F. Wells 


C 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Paul Holich 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Geo. C. & Geo. N. Pfeiffer 


NH 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Arthur B. Harris 


B 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Martin Bucala 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Malcolm Crawford 


C 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Harry E. Kingsley 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Moses & Lewis H. Kingsley 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Edith Wight Kuzmeski 


B 


7.81 


7.81 


200.00 


Paul Duga 


C 


3.90 


3.90 


100.00 


Raymond Donelson 


NH 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 


Joseph A. Darr 


NH 


5.85 


5.85 


150.00 



29 



George S. Bel den 


(New) B 


— 


— 


150.00 


Luther A. Belden 


(New) B 


— 


— 


150.00 


Leland H. Wight 


B 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Stephen Vachula 


NH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Lester Clark 


(New) NH 


.50 


.50 


150.00 




$ 780.10 $ 


771.34 $ 20,583.47 


Hannah W. Smith 










(Custody of State 


Treasurer) 




$ 


300.00 


Firemen'e Relief Fund 


3.95 


— 


105.10 


Stabilization Fund 




991.08 


— 


31,210.41 



PETER S. ROGALESKI, 

Treasurer 



30 



Assessors' Report 



Value of Assessed Real Estate $ 4,711,680.00 

Value of Assessed Personal Property 320,110.00 



Total Value of Real and Personal $ 5,031,790.00 



Number of Dwellings 732 

Number of Acres 9,060 

Town Appropriations $493,834.43 

State Audit 1,128.62 

State Parks and Reservations 2,034.30 

County Tax 27,544.54 

County Hospital Assessment 7,963.56 

Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 251.85 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Income Tax $ 44,386.14 

Corporation Tax 26,436.16 

Excise Tax 42,875.00 

Licenses 6,450.00 

Schools 8,775.00 

School Assistance 6,650.00 

Charities 200.00 

Old Age Tax Meals 703.48 

Interest on Taxes 3,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 6,175.00 

Farm Animal 200.00 

Fines 1,000.00 

Protection of Property 250.00 



31 

PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 
CHAP. 59, CIVIL LAWS 

Church Property $106,950.00 

Town Property 318,350.00 

Smith Academy 60,000.00 

Holy Trinity Cemetery 27,100.00 

American Legion 4,000.00 

D. P. W. Office 425,000.00 

Water Supply System 30,000.00 



MITCHELL W. KEMPISTY, Chm. 
RICHARD D. BELDEN 
JOSEPH S. WILKES 

Board of Assessors 



32 



Town Clerk's Report 



Male 
Female 



r ITAL 


STATISTICS 




1964 




Births 




Marriages 


18 




29 


25 







Deaths 

13 
16 



TOTAL 



43 



29 



29 



Preceding Five Years 



1963 
1962 
1961 
1960 
1959 



1964 
1963 
1962 
1961 
1960 



43 


20 




31 


35 


17 




27 


57 


16 




26 


42 


25 




21 


39 


24 




26 


LICENSES 








Dog 




Fish & Game 


192 






414 


190 






379 


157 






334 


153 






356 


129 






385 


ELECTIONS 








n. 1, 1964 






1,348 


m Election Feb. 


17, 


1964 


708 



33 



Voted at Presidential Primary April 28, 1964 : 




Democratic 


391 


Republican 


19 


Voted at State Primary September 10, 1964 : 




Democratic 


385 


Republican 


25 


Voted at State & National Election 




November 3, 1964 


1,233 


Special Town Meetings in 1964 


2 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



34 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
September 29, 1964 

ARTICLES AND VOTES UNDER SAME 



Article 1. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from Surplus Revenue a sum of money for the Selectmen's 
Expense Account. 

Article 1. Voted to lay on the table. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
or transfer the sum of $4,478.30, the balance of funds re- 
maining in the town treasury allocated for new construc- 
tion on Main Street under vote of Article 9 of the Annual 
Town Meeting held on February 17, 1964, for new con- 
struction work on King Street. 

Article 2. Voted to transfer the sum of $4,478.30, 
the balance of funds remaining in the town treasury al- 
located for new construction pn Main Street under vote of 
Article 9 of the Annual Town Meeting held on February 
17, 1964, for new construction of King Street. 

Article 3. To see what action the town will take 
toward appropriating funds to update the 1960 Engineer- 
ing Report on a Sewage System for the Town of Hatfield 
and to survey the proposed Sewage Treatment site. 

Article 3. Voted that the sum of $1,400.00 be ap- 
propriated from Surplus Revenue for engineering services 
related to updating the 1960 Engineering Report entitled 
Sewage Treatment and extensions and for surveying the 
proposed sewage treatment site. 



35 



Article 4. To see what action the town will take 
toward designating a sewage treatment plant site. 

Article 4. Voted that the town designate that tract 
of land situated between the Town Dike and the Connecti- 
cut River comprising all or portions of land belonging now 
or formerly to the Town of Hatfield, John Pelis and Ed- 
ward Tobacco consisting of approximately ten (10) acres 
as the site for a future sewage treatment plant. 

Article 5. To see what action the town will take to 
appropriate a sum of money from available funds for the 
appraisal of land sought to be purchased or taken by emi- 
nent domain proceedings for a sewage treatment plant 
site. 

Article 5. Voted that the town appropriate from 
Surplus Revenue the sum of $500.00 for the appraisal of 
land designated as the sewage treatment plant site sought 
to be purchased or taken by eminent domain proceedings. 

Article 6. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money from Surplus Revenue in the amount of 
$2,700.00 and authorize the acquisition of land from James 
Betsold and Richard Betsold situated west of the westerly 
side of West Street in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts 
for the purposes of establishing a ground water supply, or 
take any action thereon. 

Article 6. Voted to authorize the Board of Water 
Commissioners to purchase or take by eminent domain 
for the purposes of establishing a ground water supply 
land belonging to James and Richard Betsold situated west 
of the westerly side of West Street in the Town of Hatfield, 
Massachusetts and to appropriate from Surplus Revenue 
the sum of $2,700.00 for this purpose. Unanimous vote. 



36 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to acquire land 
situated west of the westerly side of West Street (Route 
5) in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts, belonging- to 
William G. Ahern and Barbara K. Ahern for the purposes 
of establishing a ground water supply and to appropriate 
the sum of $1,500.00 for this purpose, or take any action 
thereon. 

Article 7. Voted to authorize the Board of Water 
Commissioners to purchase or take by eminent domain for 
purposes of establishing a ground water supply land in the 
Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts on the west of the west- 
erly side of West Street, Route 5, belonging to William G. 
Ahern and Barbara K. Ahern and to appropriate from Sur- 
plus Revenue the sum of $1,500.00 for this purpose. Unani- 
mous vote. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to acquire 
land from Donald A. Lavigne and Jeannette O. Lavigne 
situated on the easterly side of Linseed Road in the Town 
of Hatfield, Massachusetts for the purposes of establish- 
ing a ground water supply and to appropriate the sum of 
$475.00 for this purpose, or take any action thereon. 

Article 8. Voted to authorize the Board of W^ater 
Commissioners to purchase or take by eminent domain for 
the purposes of establishing a ground water supply land in 
the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts situated east of the 
easterly side of Linseed Road belonging to Donald A. 
Lavigne and Jeannette O. Lavigne and to appropriate 
from Surplus Revenue the sum of $475.00 for this purpose. 
Unanimous vote. . . 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to acquire an 
easement in land belonging to Donald A. Lavigne and 
Jeannette O. Lavigne situated on the easterly side of Lin- 
seed Road in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts, for the 



37 

purposes of establishing a ground water supply and to ap- 
propriate the sum of $225.00 for this purpose, or take any 
action thereon. 

Article 9. Voted to authorize the Board of Water 
Commissioners to purchase or take by eminent domain 
for the purposes of establishing a ground water supply an 
easement in land in the Town of Hatfield belonging to Don- 
ald A. Lavigne and Jeannette O. Lavigne situated on the 
easterly side of Linseed Road and to appropriate from Sur- 
plus Revenue the sum of $225.00 for this purpose. Unani- 
mous vote. 



Article 10. To see if the town will vote to acquire an 
easement in land of Stephen F. Bruscoe and Alice A. Brus- 
coe situated on the westerly side of West Street (Route 5) 
in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts for the purposes of 
establishing a ground water supply and to appropriate the 
sum of $1.00 for this purpose, or take any action thereon. 

Article 10. Voted to authorize the Board of Water 
Commissioners to purchase or take by eminent domain 
for the purposes of establishing a ground water supply an 
easement in land in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts, 
belonging to Stephen F. Bruscoe and Alice A. Bruscoe 
situated on the westerly side of West Street (Route 5) and 
to appropriate the sum of $1.00 from Surplus Revenue for 
this purpose. Unanimous vote. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to acquire an 
easement in land of Michael Osley and Pauline W. Osley 
situated on the westerly side of West Street in the Town 
of Hatfield, Massachusetts for the purposes of establishing 
a ground water supply and to appropriate the sum of $1.00 
for this purpose, or take any action thereon. 



38 

Article 11. Voted to authorize the Board of Water 
Commissioners to purchase or take by eminent domain 
for the purposes of establishing a ground water supply an 
easement in land in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts 
belonging to Michael Osley and Pauline W. Osley situated 
on the westerly side of West Street (Route 5) and to ap- 
propriate the sum of $1.00 from Surplus Revenue for this 
purpose. Unanimous vote. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to construct 
a ground water supply system and to raise and appropri- 
ate or transfer the sum of $31,300.00 for this purpose, or 
take any action thereon. 

Article 12. Voted to authorize the Board of Water 
Commissioners to construct a ground water supply system 
and for this purpose to appropriate the sum of $31,300.00; 
the sum of $10,000.00 to be taken from Surplus Revenue 
and the sum of $21,300.00 to be taken from Water Avail- 
able Surplus. 



Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



39 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

December 29, 1964 

ARTICLES AND VOTES UNDER SAME 



Article 1. To see what action the town would take 
toward designating a site for a four hundred pupil high 
school on land comprising all or portions of land belonging 
to Blauvelt Tobacco Farms, Inc., Dr. Alfred J. Kaiser and 
William H. Dickinson situated off the northerly side of 
School Street in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts. 

Article 1. Voted not to designate a site for a four 
hundred pupil high school on land comprising all or por- 
tions of land belonging now or formerly to Blauvelt To- 
bacco Farms, Inc., Dr. Alfred J. Kaiser and William H. 
Dickinson situated off the northerly side of School Street 
in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts. 

Article 2. To see if the town will transfer the sum 
of $15,000.00 from Surplus Revenue for the survey of the 
proposed site for a high school and the draft of prelimi- 
nary plans for said high school building. 

Article 2. Voted to lay on the table. 

Attest : PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



40 



Visiting Nurse Association 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

Officers and Committee Members are as follows : 

President — Ethel S. Podmayer 

Vice President — Dorothy H. Sheehan 

Treasurer and Secretary — Margaret Cantwell 

Finance Committee — Gordon Woodward, Vaga 

Kugler, Dolores Labbee 
Nursing Advisory Committee — Ethel Byrne, Arlene 

Pelc, Edna Beattie 
Volunteer Committee — Elizabeth Boyle, Jovita 

Hart, Mildred Osley 
Publicity — Margaret Ryan 

Medical Advisory Committee — Dr. Byrne, Dr. Kaiser 
Chairman Board of Selectmen : 

We extend our appreciation to Dr. Byrne, Dr. Kaiser 
and the citizens of Hatfield for their assistance and co- 
operation during the past year. 

The nominal fee of $2.00 for services rendered by the 
visiting nurse has been the standard fee for several years, 
it is understood that no reimbursement is received from 
patients receiving welfare benefits. 

Facilities loaned to townspeople this past year are 
as follows: Hospital bed to four families, wheelchair to 
four individuals, crutches to twelve individuals. 



41 



The annual Well-Child Clinic was held May 12, May 
14, and one-half day May 15, 1964. 86 children were seen 
by appointment during this two and one-half day period. 
Dr. Fredericka Smith of Northampton was the examining 
pediatrician with Mrs. Helen Bardwell of Hatfield assist- 
ing as nutritionist. 

Mrs. Lucille Godek, Visiting Nurse, reports the fol- 
lowing for 1964 : Total number of visits 402 ; Fees col- 
lected $271.00 ; Visits to welfare recipients 97 ; Mileage 
1,334. 



ified Visits : 




Chronic Medical 


278 


Surgical 


20 


Communicable Disease 


70 


Child Welfare 


27 


Tuberculosis Contacts 


7 



402 

Respectfully submitted, 

ETHEL S. PODMAYER, Pres. 

Hatfield Visitinng Nurse Assn. 



42 
EXPENSES AND RECEIPTS FOR 1964 



Balance as of Jan. 1, 1964 
Visiting Nurse Receipts 
Town 


$ 230.20 

271.00 

1,800.00 




Total Receipts for 1964 

Expenses : 
Salary- 
Social Security 
Mileage 
Clerk 
Printing of Checks 


$ 

$2,000.00 

72.63 

120.06 

25.00 

4.58 


2,301.20 


Total Expenses for 1964 


$ 


2,222.27 


Balance as of January 1, 1965 


$ 


78.93 



43 



Report of the Fire Department 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

I wish to submit my first annual report of the Fire 
Department. I would like to thank all the officers and fire- 
fighters for their co-operation and help during the fires 
and other calls which we had in the past year. I also want 
to thank the citizens of Hatfield for their co-operation 
during the dry season we had this past fall. 

The Fire Department has bought a set of Walkie- 
Talkies and 2 sets of rubber ramps for hose. The ramps 
were bought with the Street Dept. and can be used by 
either Department. 

During the past year the fire trucks were called out 
65 times which are as follows : 



Oil Burner Fires 


5 


Garage Fires 


2 


Chimney Fire 


1 


House Fires 


3 


Dump Fires 


15 


Grass Fires 


17 


Tool Shed Fire 


1 


Tractor Fire 


1 


Car Fires 


2 


Cheese Cloth 


1 


Barns 


4 


Cabin in Mountain 


1 


Wash of gas off road 


1 



44 



Electric Generator 


1 


Grease from cooking on stove 


3 


Overturned cement truck 


1 


Work shops 


2 


Couch Fire 


1 


Woods 


1 


Thunderstorm 


2 



65 

There were 87 outdoor burning permits issued and 
10 Oil Burner permits issued. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MYRON J. SIKORSKI 

Fire Chief 



45 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

During the past year a great deal more trimming and 
pruning had to be done due to high win ds and the ice and 
sleet storms. This work was done in the most hazardous 
areas of Main St., Prospect St., School St., Elm St., Maple 
St., Valley St., South St., Porter Ave., Chestnut St., Old 
Farms Rd., Bradstreet Depot Rd., North Hatfield Rd. and 
Pantry Rd. 

Twenty-eight young maple trees were planted and 
fertilized, as replacements and in new sites. 

All roadside trees were sprayed with D.D.T. 

Sixteen trees infected with Dutch Elm disease were 
taken down and burned. 

Fifteen other trees were taken down as hazardous or 
wood decay. 

Some assistance was given on four of these trees by 
the Utility Companies, where power lines were involved. 

Tree Removals were as follows : 

Main St., 10 Elms, 3 Maples 
Maple St., 1 Elm 
Elm St., 3 Elms 
DwightSt.,2Elms 



46 



Chestnut St., 4 Elms, 1 Maple 
Linseed Rd., 1 Maple 
North Hatfield Rd., 1 Elm 
North Hatfield Cemetery, 1 Elm 
North St., 1 Elm 
Prospect St., 1 Maple 
Bradstreet Depot Rd., 2 Elms 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCIS E. GODIN 

Tree Warden 



47 



Library Report 



To the Trustees of the Public Library 
and the Citizens of Hatfield : 

I herewith submit my fifth annual report as Librarian 
of Hatfield: 

During the year 846 books were added to the Library. 
Of these 424 were for children and 422 were for adults. 
Books and magazines donated to the library are most wel- 
come and we wish to thank the many townspeople who 
so generously gave these to the Library. 

A total of 36,702 books and periodicals were taken out 
during the year. The circulation for the year showed a 
considerable increase in the adult fiction and adult and 
children non-fiction. 

The circulation was as follows : 

Juvenile fiction 16,791 

Juvenile non-fiction 7,013 

Adult fiction 7,934 

Adult non-fiction 4,964 

We borrowed 2,091 books from the Regional Library 
Center in Greenfield. We also borrowed an additional 210 
books from Boston and Forbes Library. Through the 
Inter-Library Loan we can borrow any book that we do 
not have. We are more than glad to make use of this 
privilege for any of our borrowers. 



48 



Again this year we had a summer reading program 
at which more than 50 children participated. We wish to 
thank the Real Folks for making this possible. At the 
completion of the program a social hour was held at which 
Mrs. Rowe from Greenfield showed a full length film. 

During National Library week, with the co-operation 
of the teachers we had a poster contest. Prizes were given 
to the student who had the best poster in each grade. The 
Woman's Endeavor also sponsored an evening program. 
The program had as speaker Mrs. Cane, Librarian from 
Whately. 

Again this year we had story hours every second 
week during the summer. We are most grateful to our 
story tellers who were Mrs. Rowe of Greenfield, Mrs. Rita 
Prew of Hatfield, and Mrs. Anne Tierney of the Hatfield 
Teaching Staff . 

The children's room in our library is too small to ac- 
comodate all the children that come to the library during 
the noon hour. The room also lacks in book space. 

When the last room was built onto the library the 
space underneath was constructed so that with only a few 
additions it could be made into a library room. The build- 
ing inspector has approved of this. By renovating this 
cellar room it could be used as a reference room and the 
room above could be used for the children as originally 
planned. If this is done we would have the much needed 
space to carry out our work more efficiently. 

During the year I attended a number of library meet- 
ings and workshops. 

Our Library is open Monday and Friday from 11 :30 
A.M. to 2:00 P.M. and 6:45 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. and on 
Wednesday from 11 :30 A.M. to 8 :00 P.M. 



49 

To Mrs. Helen Osley, Mrs. Doris Vollinger, the 
Trustees and teachers I wish to express my sincere ap- 
preciation for their co-operation and assistance during the 
past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. CANTWELL 

Librarian 



50 



Police Report 

1964 



I respectfully submit the report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1964. Also the 
number of arrests in the Town of Hatfield. 

Assault with dangerous weapon 1 

Drunkenness 3 

Institutions 5 

Altering driving license 2 

Stop sign 1 

Open muffler 1 

No registration in possession 1 

Passing when view obstructed 1 

One way street 1 

Speeding 16 

Registry action 5 

Motor vehicles equipment tags 2 

Summons served 29 

Warrants served 1 

Accidents investigated 21 

Dogs destroyed 2 
All committed dog taxes collected 



Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY SLIWOSKI 

Chief of Police 



51 

Report of Water Commissioners 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

During the year 1964 the Water Department renewed 
water services on newly constructed King Street and Brad- 
street. 

It completed the connection under Route 91 of a 12" 
Water Main at the Bridge Street crossing. This was done 
because the cost later would be greater when the Town 
follows plans to install a larger main to this part of town. 

Testing on a gravel packed well was completed last 
spring and at a special Town Meeting $31,300 was voted 
to buy land and install a well, which at this time is well 
under way, with a completion date of early summer. This 
well was drilled and tested by the R. E. Chapman Co. of 
Oakdale, Mass. who was the low bidder. 

The well and connection to the water main is under 
the direction of Tighe & Bond Consulting Engineers. The 
Massachusetts State Department of Health has tested 
this water and soil conditions and have approved them. 
They will also have a final approval before water will enter 
the town lines. 

The Water Commissioners wish to thank the Town's 
people for their cooperation during the summer dry spells. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH F. VOLLINGER, Chm. 
RUPERT HARUBIN 
JOHN R. RUDY 

Water Commissioners 



52 



Report of Gas Inspector 



I respectfully submit my report for the year ending 
December 31, 1964. 

47 permits were issued, all permits were acted on 
all gas piping was inspected and appliances served 

2 clothes dryers 

1 floor furnace 

2 wall size heaters 
21 water heaters 
40 domestic ranges 

1 gas oven 
1 relocation 

3 permits were granted for liquified petroleum 

All unsatisfactory piping and appliances were cor- 
rected. 



Respectfully submitted, 

HAROLD B. LIZEK 

Gas Inspector 



53 



School Building Committee Report 



The school building- committee used as its guide lines 
the recommendations of the school building needs com- 
mittee as approved at the last annual town meeting: (1) 
A plan to construct and equip a complete junior- senior 
high school. (2) To prepare a long-range plan for a jun- 
ior-senior high school, with the co-operation of the Smith 
Academy Trustees, to be constructed in stages. (3) To 
prepare plans for an addition to the present Smith Acad- 
emy, incorporating and remodeling the present Town Hall 
as part of the needed facilities. 

The building committee has held thirteen regular 
meetings of which two each were with Whately and Had- 
ley on the possibilities of regionalization, and a conference 
with the Massachusetts School Building Assistance Com- 
mission in Boston and the Trustees of Smith Academy. 

After surveying the present school building and 
facilities and the projected enrollment, the committee con- 
cluded that the housing problem exists in grades nine 
through twelve. It was further agreed that a complete 
new school with all the facilities is the best for the educa- 
tional and physical welfare of our youth and it will best 
serve our community over the long-run both educationally 
and economically. 

The committee retained the services of Caolo and 
Bieniek Associates, Inc., Architects and Engineers of 
Spring-field to view and evaluate possible sites out of the 



54 

seven possible sites considered. The School Street site 
was highly recommended. 

At the request of the School Building Committee a 
special town meeting was held on December 29, 1964 for 
the purpose of: (1) to see what action the town would take 
toward designating a site for a four hundred pupil high 
school on land comprising all or portions of land belonging 
now or formerly to Blauvelt Tobacco Farms, Inc., Dr. Al- 
fred Kaiser, and William H. Dickinson situated off the 
northerly side of School Street. (2) To see if the town 
will transfer the sum of $15,000.00 from Surplus Revenue 
for the survey of proposed site for a high school and the 
drafting of preliminary plans for said high school building. 

The vote under Article I to designate a site was nega- 
tive, and it was voted to table Article II. 

The committee is now revaluating its findings and 
recommendations to see what other possibilities exist, 
that can adaquately serve the educational and physical 
needs of our youth and community. 

It is with the best interest for the educational welfare 
of the pupils of this community and townspeople that your 
committee is dedicated. 

The committe wishes to express its appreciation to 
the various town and state officials and to all other persons 
who have given freely of their time and knowledge in 
assisting the committee in its work. 



55 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hatfield School Building Needs Committee : 

THADDEUS KABAT, Chairman 
JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI, Secretary 
RICHARD. D. BELDEN 
MRS. ETHEL BYRNE 
WILLIAM H.BURKE 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
WILLIAM S. OLSZEWSKI 
EUGENE F. PROULX 
RAYMOND RUSSELL 
STANLEY SLIWOSKI 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1964 



58 



Report of Town Accountant 



RECEIPTS 

GENERAL REVENUE 

Taxes: 

Personal 1964 $ 17,421.60 

Real 1964 228,677.87 

Trailer 1964 228.00 

In Lieu of Taxes 117.73 

Poll Previous Years 330.00 

Personal Previous Years 2,828.42 

Real Previous Years 41,375.97 



$290,979.59 



Motor Vehicle Excise : 

Levy of 1964 $ 42,393.63 

Previous Years 16,750.68 

59,144.31 

Farm Animal Excise : 

Previous Years 130.01 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 






Income Tax 


$ 13,202.17 




Corporation Tax 


25,681.81 




Chapter 70 G. L. 


31,385.00 




Meal Tax 


1,014.46 


71,283.44 






Licenses and Permits: 






Liquor 


$ 5,800.00 




Milk 


4.00 




Junk 


8.00 




Pool 


5.00 




All Other 


366.50 


6,183.50 






Court Fines 




180.00 



59 



RECEIPTS 

Grants from Federal Government: 

Old Age Assistance $ 4,458.71 

Aid to Dependent Children 627.74 

Medical Assistance for Aged 6,168.07 

School Lunch, C. D. Fund Federal 7,921.74 

Schools — P. L. #864 9,169.09 

Schools — P. L. #874 8,414.00 



36,759.3b 



Grants from Commonwealth: 

Vocational Education $ 3,866.62 

Transportation of Pupils 6,094.65 

Free Public Libraries 587.50 

Highway Chap. 81 14,291.43 



24,840.20 



Giants from Hampshire County: 

Dog Licenses 147.53 



Total General Government $489,647.93 

COMMERCIAL GOVERNMENT 



Town Hall 


$ 


57.25 


Board of Appeals 




70.00 


Outlays 




88.02 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 




64.15 


Slaughter Inspection Fees 




65.75 


Sewer Connections 




175.00 


Dog Disposal 




136.00 


Bounty 




10.00 


Highways: 






Chapter 90 Maint. — State 


$ 1,000.00 




Chapter 90 Maint. — County 


1,000.00 




Machinery Fund 


6,639.02 




Chapter 90 Construction — State 


9,499.88 




Chapter 90 Construction — County 


4,749.94 




Chapter 822 Acts '63 


8,361.16 




Individuals — Damages 


375.00 


31.625.00 



60 



RECEIPTS 

Public Welfare: 
Welfare — State 
A. D. C. — State 
0. A. A. —State 
0. A. A. Individual — Recovery 
Med. Assist. Aged — State 


$ 60.23 

173.36 

1,162.98 

8,080.26 

4,848.87 


14,325.70 
2,067.26 

23,354.97 
110.90 

23,683.10 

6,654.55 

35.20 

47.49 

1,866.22 

210.25 

2,951.93 
780.10 


Veterans' Benefits 

Schools : 

Athletic Fund 

School Lunch Collections 

Damages — truck 


$ 1,547.85 

21,796.00 

11.12 


Library Fines 

Water Department: 
Water Rents 
Water Conn, and Misc. 


$ 23,153.10 
530.00 


School Construction — Chap. 645 Acts '48 
Compensation — State Withholding Tax 
Insurance Refund — Boiler Explosion 
Insurance Dividend Chap. 32 B 
Care of Cemetery Lots 

General Interest: 
Interest on Taxes 
Interest on Motor Vehicle Excise 
Charges and Fees 


$ 2,362.38 

494.95 

94.60 


Interest on Trust Funds 


$ 


Total Commercial Revenue 


108,378.84 



AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 



Dog Licenses Due County 
Cemetei-y Perpetual Care 
Withholding — Federal 
Withholding — State 



New 



381.25 

950.00 

25,792.30 

2,797.15 



61 



RECEIPTS 

Retirement 3,385.51 

Blue Cross 4,099.77 

Teachers' Health and Accident Ins. 498.36 

$ 37,844.34 

Refunds 140.95 

Cash on Hand January 1, 1964 204,134.49 

TOTAL $840,146.55 



62 

PAYMENTS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
Moderator $ 25.00 

Selectmen : 

Salaries 1,500.00 

Clerk 300.00 

Expenses : 

Printing, Postage, Stationery $ 181.25 

Travel 72.25 

Dues 41.00 

All Other 15.00 

309.50 



2,375.00 



Accountant : 






Salary 






Expenses : 






Printing, Postage, Stationery 


$ 


96.61 


Equipment 




73.25 


Dues 




5.00 


Treasurer : 






Salary 






Expenses : 






Printing, Postage, Stationery 


$ 


150.37 


Bond 




154.80 


Clerical 




240.00 


Dues 




4.00 


Travel 




125.60 



174.86 



2,775.00 



674.77 

Tax Collector : 

Salary $ 2,000.00 

Expense : 

Clerical $ 421.25 

Printing, Postage, Stationery 356.42 



63 








PAYMENTS 








Bond 




326.50 




Dues 




4.00 




Travel 




88.00 


1,196.17 








Assessors : 
Salary- 






2,400.00 


Expense : 








Clerical 


$ 


210.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 




285.18 




Travel 




80.78 




All Other 




57.60 


633.56 
1,000.00 


Attorney's Fees 






Town Clerk: 








Salary 






2,475.00 


Expense : 








Recording Fees 


$ 


85.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 




148.11 




Bond 




10.00 




Dues 




11.50 




Clerical 




180.00 




Travel 




115.20 


549.81 


Election and Registration: 






Registrars 


$ 


297.00 




Election Officers 




563.00 




Clerical 




210.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 




52.80 




Street Lists 




521.50 





1,644.30 

Elector Under Oliver Smith Will 10.00 

Appeals Board Expense 78.68 

Planning Board Expense 13.10 



64 





PAYMENTS 




Town Hall : 






Janitor 




$ 3,050.80 


Fuel 




2,189.97 


Lights 




1,102.67 


Janitor's Supplies 




143.67 


Repairs 




1,068.25 


License 




25.00 

7 5ff0 36 




1 |UOl/iOU 


Total General Government 


$ 27,715.11 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Police Department: 

Chief $ 2,750.00 

Salary Allow. — Gas & Tires 250.00 

Men 556.55 

Insurance 313.60 

Postage 6.00 

Misc. Equipment 24.98 

All Other 41.95 



-$ 3,943.08 



Fire Department: 

Chief $ 400.00 

Clerk 100.00 

Men 629.30 

Dues 10.00 

Misc. Equip. & Supplies 386.35 

Hose 430.82 

Oil, Grease & Gas 117.61 

Parts & Repairs — Equip. 342.05 

Fuel 246.91 

Lights 67.25 

Rent 240.00 

Printing, Postage 20.85 

Telephone 340.43 

All Other 84.39 



3,415.96 



65 



PAYMENTS 






Sealer of Weights & Measures: 






Salary $ 


200.00 




Expense: Misc. Supplies, Travel 


54.00 


254.00 
133.36 


Gas Inspector Salary 




Civil Defense: 






Salary Director $ 


150.00 




Misc. Equipment 


234.40 


384.40 
2,200.00 


Moth Work 




Tree Work 




2,581.12 


Total Protection Persons and Property 


$ 12,911.92 


HEALTH AND SANITATION 




Public Health 


$ 


38.25 


Immunization of School Children 




15.00 


Insp. Children — Tuberculosis 




71.08 


Well Child Clinic 




195.00 


Visiting Nurse 




1,800.00 


School Physician 




500.00 


Inspection of Animals and Slaughter 




275.00 


Total Health and Sanitation 


$ 


2,944.33 


HIGHWAYS 






Highway General : 






Wages $ 


775.15 




Telephone 


197.63 




Fuel 


163.89 




Light 


53.85 




Bulldoze Dump 


90.00 




Misc. Equipment & Suppies 


501.93 




Rent of Dump 


350.00 




All Other 


48.50 




Sewer Work — Labor 


573.15 




Sewer Work — Material 


261.12 






$ 


3,015.22 





66 






PAYMENTS 






Snow and Ice Removal: 








Labor 




$ 5,088.85 




Sidewalks 




384.00 


5,472.85 




$ 


Total Highway General 


8,488.07 


Dike Repairs 






111.60 


School Street Sidewalk 






361.30 


North Street Sidewalk 






999.90 


Street Lights 






5,316.72 


Highway Chap. 81: 








Labor 




$ 11,949.60 




Town Machinery 




3,802.20 




Other Machinery 




350.00 




Winter Sand 




1,028.51 




Salt 




749.98 




Bituminous Concrete, Patch, 


etc. 


1,893.96 




Stone, Gravel 




689.01 




Culverts & Blocks 




669.99 




Misc. 




116.75 


21,250.00 






Highway Chap. 90 New Const. - 


- Main St. : 






Labor 




$ 3,634.80 




Town Machinery 




1,403.50 




Other Machinery 




869.00 




Misc. — Cement, Calcium 




236.80 




Bituminous Concrete 




7,401.60 




Gravel 




976.00 


14,521.70 






Highway Chap 90 New Const. - 


- King St. : 






Labor 




$ 3,394.80 




Town Machinery 




995.80 




Other Machinery 




360.00 




Cement Blocks, etc. 




418.78 




Pipe 




2,554.97 




Bituminous Concrete 




1,978.92 


Q 7f>3 97 



67 



Highway Chap. 90 Maintenance: 








Labor 


$ 


764.40 




Town Machinery 




151.52 




Bituminous Concrete 




1,984.68 




Misc. 




99.40 


3,000.00 








Machinery Operating: 








Parts and Repairs 


$ 


2,177.71 




Gas 




1,730.56 




Oil and Grease 




91.73 








J! 


4,000.00 






V 


Total Highways 


$ 67,752.56 



CHARITIES AND VETERANS' BENEFITS 

Public Welfare: 

Salary — Agent $ 228.60 

Printing, Postage, Stationery 49.50 

Travel 87.44 

Groceries 360.00 

Medicine & Medical Care 126.85 

Cash Grants to Individuals 96.00 



948.39 



Aid to Dependent Children: 

Cash Aid — Town Account $ 19.35 

Cash Aid — Federal Account 443.85 

Agent's Salary — Town Account 18.40 

Agent's Salary — Federal Account 197.40 

Travel 10.56 



689.56 



Medical Assistance for Aged: 

Cash Aid — Town Account $ 4,854.45 

Cash Aid — Federal Account 5,922.73 

Agent's Salary — Town Account 368.00 

Agent's Salary — Federal Account 761.50 



11,906.68 



68 

PAYMENTS 

Old Age Assistance: 

Cash Aid — Town Account $ 739.34 

Cash Aid — Federal Account 5,181.25 

Agent's Salary — Town Account 987.85 

Agent's Salary — Federal Account 590.45 

Other Cities and Towns 39.86 



7,538.75 



Veterans' Benefits: 

Salary — Agent $ 400.00 

Office Expense 25.45 

Aid 1,188.00 

Medical 628.74 



2,242.19 



Total Charities and Veterans' Benefits $ 23,325.57 



SCHOOLS 

General Administration: 

Superintendent's Salary $ 3,300.00 

Clerk 1,893.85 

Printing, Postage, Stationery 497.02 

Telephone 564.50 

Traveling 367.95 

Census 75.00 

Dues 191.50 

All Other 27.97 



Teachers' Salaries: 




High 


$ 46,325.84 


Elementary 


71,204.08 


Junior High 


41,651.04 


Music 


2,163.20 


Penmanship 


500.00 


Crippled Children 


63.20 



$ 6,918.69 



161,907.36 



69 



PAYMENTS 



Text and Reference Books: 
High 

Elementary 
Junior High 



$ 1,212.17 

1,630.82 

663.38 



Supplies : 




High 


$ 1,504.64 


Elementary 


2,160.99 


Junior High 


1,005.73 


Physical Education 


637.37 


Driver Education 


282.30 


Audio-Visual 


249.44 


Transportation : 




High 


$ 2,502.25 


Elementary 


7,506.75 


Athletic 


990.23 


Janitors' Services: 




High 


$ 3,600.00 


Junior High 


4,000.00 


Elementary 


4,600.00 


Fuel and Light: 




High 


$ 1,626.68 


Junior High 


2,085.90 


Elementary 


5,488.08 



3,506.37 



5,840.47 



10,999.23 



12,200.00 



9,200.66 



Maintenance of Buildings & Grounds : 
High School Janitor's Supplies 
High School Janitor's Supplies — 

Town Hall 
Junior High Janitor's Supplies 
Elementary Janitor's Supplies 
Elementary Repairs 
Junior High Repairs 



780.51 

158.65 

683.98 

1,816.09 

1,118.07 

2,122.16 



6,679.46 



70 



PAYMENTS 

New Equipment 2,058.50 

Diplomas 200.80 

Nurse 2,300.00 

Nurse's Travel 23.68 

Health Supplies 63.77 

Insurance 497.85 

Repairs to School Vehicles 76.15 

Gas and Oil School Vehicles 123.63 



Total Paid from School Appropriation $222,596.62 

School Committee Expense 200.00 

Federal Aid — Public Law #864 9,064.42 

Federal Aid — Public Law #874 931.32 

Athletic Fund 1,955.46 

School Building Comm. Expense 54.83 

Vocational School Tuition 6,622.49 

Vocational School Transportation 1,246.00 



Total Schools $242,671.14 



SCHOOL LUNCH 



Collection Account : 










Wages 








$ 8,427.51 


Clerk 








734.00 


Food 








10,893.03 


Misc. Supplies 








329.97 


Fuel 








16.80 


Repairs 








940.09 


Equipment 








212.31 


Misc. 








25.24 


Janitor Service Elementary Lunch 


50.00 










Ol COO QC 




£di. t O&O.VO 


Commodity Distribution Fund - 


- Federal : 




Food 








$ 6,805.74 


Misc. Supplies 








415.06 


Equipment 








562.83 


Travel 








54.71 


Janitor Services — 


- Elem. 


Sch. 


Lunchroom 


50.00 



Fuel 
Misc. 



Total School Lunch 



71 




PAYMENTS 






8.40 




25.00 




7 9°1 74 








$ 29,550.69 





LIBRARY 




Librarian 




$ 1,800.00 


Asst. Librarians 




1,140.50 


Janitor's Services 




215.00 


Books 




2,232.59 


Periodicals 




37.70 


Binding Books 




34.10 


Fuel 




264.05 


Lights 




81.02 


Repairs 




209.39 


Postage & Stationery 




15.60 


Travel 




13.68 


Misc. Supplies and Equipment 


139.52 

i 



$ 6,183.15 



UNCLASSIFIED 
Telephone $ 301.95 



Memorial Day 


366.65 


Care of Town Clock 


50.00 


Print and Deliver Town Reports 


774.30 


Outlays 


102.22 


Unpaid Bills 


197.45 


Stabilization Fund 


20,000.00 


Dog Disposal 


51.00 


Est. Rec. OAA Rec. to State 


864.60 


Youth League 


200.00 


Care & Maint. Hamp. County Sanatorium 


7,963.56 


Retirement Assessment 


3,905.60 


Unclassified 


147.60 


Bind Books 


50.00 




$ 34,974.93 



72 



PAYMENTS 




INSURANCE 




Town Schedule 


$ 2,788.84 


Monies and Securities 


74.45 


Liability, Prop. Damage, Collision, 




Comp. Vehicles 


1,908.79 


Workmen's Compensation 


1,768.32 


Volunteer Firemen 


154.50 


Public Liability 


525.98 

$ 



7,220.88 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Commissioners' Salaries 


$ 


900.00 


Collector's Salary 


$ 815.00 




Clerical 


160.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


56.13 




Labor 


2,596.75 




Gas, Oil, Repairs, Truck 


72.29 




Pipe and Fittings 


1,973.31 




Equipment Rental 


308.50 




All Other 


60.78 




Care of Chlorinator 


600.00 




Fuel, Light, Power 


111.13 




Chlorine 


266.00 




Henley-Lundgren Contract — 91 


1,271.70 


8,291.59 






Planning Surface Water Supply — 






Running Gutter Brook 




1,069.69 


Exploration & Development Underground Supply 


8,906.50 


Construct Underground Water Supply 




819.34 


Total Water Department 


$ 


19,987.12 


CEMETERIES 






Clerk 


$ 50.00 




Labor 


1,100.00 




Postage 


5.00 




Foundations, etc. 


400.00 




All Other 


28.45 






$ 


1,583.45 



73 







PAYMENTS 










INTEREST 






Water Loan 
School Buildin 


g Loan 




$ 280.00 
12,187.50 


12,467.50 








MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 




School Loan 
Water Loan 






$ 25,000.00 
4,000.00 
$ 29,000.00 



AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

State Audit Tax $ 1,128.62 



State Parks Tax 


1,866.78 


County Tax 


27,137.81 


Dog Tax Due County 


173.00 


Teachers' Health and Accident 


498.36 


Cemetery Perpetual Care — New- 


950.00 


Cemetery Perpetual Care — Interest 


8.76 


Federal Withholding 


25,792.30 


State Withholding 


2,797.15 


Retirement 


3,385.51 


Blue Cross 


6,745.56 


Insurance Chap. 32 B 


1,181.29 


Motor Vehicle Bills Tax 


251.85 




$ 71 Q1fi Q9 






REFUNDS 




Taxes 


$ 3,959.10 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


2,781.16 




$ 6,740.26 


Total Payments 


$596,945.60 


Balance January 1, 1965 


243,200.95 


TOTAL 


$840,146.55 



GERTRUDE B. ROGALESKI, 

Town Accountant 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, J 964 



87 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Ethel I. Byrne, Chairman Term Expires 1966 

Stanley Sliwoski, Secretary Term Expires 1967 

Henry F. Kulesza Term Expires 1965 

Regular school committee meetings are held 

at Smith Academy 

on the second Monday of each month 

or at a time convenient to the members of 

the school committee. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John A. Skarzynski 
School Office : Home Address : 

High School Building King Street 

Telephone : CH 7-2361 Hatfield, Mass. 

WORK CERTIFICATES AND SCHOOL CLERK 

Marie P. Sheehan 

15 Chestnut Street 

Office telephone 247-2361 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Robert C. Byrne, M.D. 

46 Main Street 

Telephone 247-2661 

Alfred J. Kaiser, M.D. 

School Street 

Telephone 247-4151 



88 

SCHOOL NURSE 

Mrs. Lucille Godek, R.N. 
19 Prospect Street 
Telephone 247-2921 

CORPS OF TEACHERS 1964 - 1965 

Superintendent of Schools and Principal of 

Smith Academy 

John A. Skarzynski 
Driver Education 

Smith Academy 

Florence E. Muller, Assistant Principal 
French I, II, III; Latin II, Guidance 

Margaret E. Pruzynski 

Typing I, II; Shorthand I, II; 

Bookkeeping; Secretarial Practice 

Mary A. Spakowski 
Home Economics; Biology; Jr. Business Math 

John H. Naumowicz 
English II-A, III-A, IV-A, III-B; 

Humanities 

Leonard A. Yarrows 

Algebra II; Plane Geometry; Senior Math; 

Chemistry; Physics 

David L. Prentiss 
U. S. History; Civics; Problems of Democracy 

Richard S. Nadolny 

English II-B, IV-B; Economics; Typing I; 

Business Training; High School Soccer Coach; 

Junior High Basketball Coach 



89 

Center School — Junior High 

Grades 7, 8, 9 
Dorothy Breor, Principal 

Jean Kempisty, Assistant Principal 
Grades 7, 8; Social Studies, Music, Glee Club 

Maxwell Moczulewski 

Grade 9; Math; Algebra; Math Club; 

High School Basketball Coach 

Joseph F. Savage — Grade 8 
Reading; English; School Paper 
High School JV Basketball and 

Junior High Baseball Coach 

Caroline Kozera — Grade 9 

English; Conversational French; French I, H; 

French Club; Girls' Basketball Coach 

Arthur Andrews — Grade 7 
Science; Art; Science Club; 

High School Baseball and 

Junior High Soccer Coach 

James A. Devlin — Grade 8 
English; Reading; Latin; Library Club 

John D. Leary, Jr. 

Grades 7-9; World History; General Science; 

General Math; Physical Education 

Elementary School 

Dorothy Breor, Principal — Remedial Reading 

Grade 6 
Frances Celatka Bernadette Pipczynski 

Grade 5 
Cynthia Tessier Virginia Klaes 







90 




Hilda Fortsch 




Grade 4 


Patricia Klaes 


Anne Tierney 




Grade 3 


Ann Labbee 


Eleanor Stenglein 


Grade 2 


Martha Boyle 


Helen Kostek 




Grade 1 
Supervisors 


Lura Bieda 


Music 
Penmanship 


— Esther Norris 

— William Rinehart Co. 



Custodians 

Elementary — Mitchell Kempisty 

Center School — Chester Celatka 

High School — John Besko 



Transporters 

John W. Maroney — Regular School Transportation 
Frank Skroski, Jr. — Vocational School Transportation 



School Lunch Workers 



Winifred Betsold, Manager 
Wanda Shea 
Bertha Kosakowski 
Rita Osley 



Hazel Roberts, Asst. Mgr. 

Susan Zima 

Helen Kugler 

Mary Vachula 



91 



Report of the School Committee 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield : 

We are living today in a world that is vastly different 
from the world we knew in our childhood. We are in a 
period of extremely rapid change. Things are happening 
so fast that none of us can really comprehend the speed 
with which the world moves today. Because the schools 
have the principle responsibility for the development of 
the character of our children, the public schools must pro- 
vide the opportunities needed in this time of change. We, 
in Hatfield, must recognize the fact that what happens in 
our schools today will greatly affect the character of our 
community in the future. From our school system each 
year students are graduated who will represent our town 
for years to come. Whether or not the talents offered by 
these students are used in our own town or in some other 
town, city, state, or country, they will have been molded 
here. The schools play an important part in furnishing 
the proper tools and equipment for the teaching profes- 
sion to accomplish the aims of a good school system. 
Those who will be in positions of power are in our schools 
today. To a large degree, the Hatfield School Committee 
has strived to provide these modern opportunities to our 
school children in this time of rapid change. 

In looking back on the past twelve months, public edu- 
cation in Hatfield was maintained on a sound basis despite 
the challenge of a continued growing school population. 

The school committee held 11 regular and 3 special 
meetings during the year. 



92 



A complete list of school personnel can be found in an- 
other section of this report. In reviewing the teaching 
staff situation, we found two changes took place in the ele- 
mentary school and one change in the junior high school. 

Mrs. Marilyn Schroth, resigned to be at home. 

Mrs. Patricia Lannaville, resigned to be at home. 

Miss Iris-Ann Hubbard, resigned to teach in Cali- 
fornia. 

Mrs. Lura Bieda, elected teacher of Grade I. 

Miss Bemadette Pipczynski, elected teacher of Grade 
VI. 

Miss Caroline Kozera, elected teacher in junior high 
school. 

A summary of past and anticipated enrollments is 
presented in charts to be found incorporated in this school 
department report on another page. You are encouraged 
to turn to and examine these charts closely. With a grow- 
ing school population, school expenditures also increase. 
We must realize that if we are to continue to meet the 
needs of our future citizens, we must accept heavier finan- 
cial responsibilities for our schools. The regular school 
budget and the vocational budget for 1965 have been care- 
fully prepared and submitted to the town accountant as re- 
quired by law. The Hatfield Finance Committee and the 
School Committee have met and discussed the school bud- 
get. Because of the schools, many reimbursements are 
received for educational expenditures, but because of the 
laws of the Commonwealth, these funds are not credited 
against educational expenditures, but are deposited in the 
Reserve Fund where they may be drawn upon for expendi- 
tures for other purposes. These figures are incorporated 
in the school department reports and you are encouraged 
to turn to and examine them closely. 



93 

Contracts this past year were awarded to the follow- 
ing- concerns : the oil contract to the Maroney Oil Com- 
pany, the regular school transportation contract to the 
Maroney Bus Company, and the vocational transportation 
contract to the Skroski Bus Company. 

Besides the ordinary maintenance carried out during 
the year, the following maintenance and repair program 
was carried out. At the elementary school the outside of 
the building was painted, as were the inside of the student 
cloakrooms and the doors of the teacher cabinets. In the 
junior high, Venetian blinds were re-corded, the hallways, 
window frames and one classroom were painted, the play- 
ground was repaired and through the co-operation of Mr. 
Francis Godin, the trees were pruned. 

The trustees of Smith Academy carried out necessary 
maintenance and repairs to the Smith Academy Building. 
One exit door was repaired, several window panes replaced, 
a section of the roof was repaired, a ceiling in one large 
classroom was painted and two large classroom floors were 
sanded and sealed. These repairs were taken care of with- 
out cost to the town. The trustees have been very co-op- 
erative in maintaining the building and definitely deserve 
a vote of appreciation. 

The following pieces of new equipment were added to 
the school system: four typewriters, tractor and acces- 
sories, goggles for the labs, to comply with the new state 
law, film strips, map rails, audio-visual and science equip- 
ment, storage equipment and the major addition, educa- 
tional television in the elementary school. The ETV now 
provides the opportunities for enriching the elementary 
program in the field of reading, language, science, and the 
humanities. 

The Hatfield School Committee is consistently repre- 
sented at the area, state, and national school board meet- 



94 

ings. Mrs. Byrne and Mr. Sliwoski were appointed to 
serve as school committee representatives on the Hatfield 
School Building Committee, authorized at the annual town 
meeting. 

The committee strongly urges the citizens of Hatfield 
to support the building committee in its study to solve the 
future school needs. 

The committee is pleased to acknowledge the interests 
of the following citizens and civic clubs in the education of 
our students. The following honors are awarded to de- 
serving members of the high school graduating class : 

American Legion Post Awards 

Hatfield Book Club Annual Literary Award 

Lions Club Award 

Woman's Club of the Holy Trinity Catholic Church 
Award 

Woman's Endeavor Society Award 

M. Larkin Proulx Award 

The Parent-Teachers Council Awards 

Hatfield Teachers Club Award 

Suzanne M. Novak Memorial Award 

The Massachusetts Department of Education directed 
all school committees to adopt the accounting system 
recommended by the U. S. Department of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare entitled "Financial Accounting for Local 
and State School Systems". Its purpose is to standardize 
receipt and expenditure accounts to provide the founda- 
tion for accurate recording, reporting and interpreting 
financial information about the public schools in the Com- 



95 

monwealth and the nation. Standard financial accounts 
will serve to improve the accuracy of local, state and na- 
tional summaries and result in more realistic comparisons 
of financial information among communities and states. 
It will represent a more accurate picture of actual per 
pupil cost figures among the various towns and cities in 
this state. The new breakdown of the operating budgets 
for the schools, as it appears in the school department re- 
port, provides our citizens with a more accurate budget 
and in more detail. 

It should be carefully noted that the space problem in 
our schools is becoming acute and there will soon be a need 
for additional facilities for educational purposes. The 
town of Hatfield has been extremely fortunate that con- 
struction of school buildings since the end of World War 
II has been limited to a 12-room elementary school. Few 
other towns in Massachusetts can say the same. Many 
factors have brought about the shortage of space. Num- 
bered among these is the greater expectancy of a child en- 
tering first grade and completing twelfth grade. In Hat- 
field, this is close to 100%. With this comes the expan- 
sion of courses necessary to equip the student with the 
knowledge to meet the challenges and requirements need- 
ed after high school graduation. 

Both the superintendent's and elementary principal's 
reports carry a more detailed account of the activities of 
the Hatfield Public Schools. These reports were read and 
approved by the school committee and your attention is 
called to them. 

The committee wishes to express its appreciation for 
services rendered to a former member of the school board, 
Mr. Joseph J. Wendlowski, Jr., who retired from the school 
board in February 1964. 



96 

In conclusion, the school committee wishes to thank 
members of the school staff, town officials, parents and 
citizens for their contributions to the Hatfield Schools dur- 
ing the past year. Your guidance and support have been 
most helpful. 



Respectfully submitted, 

ETHEL I. BYRNE 
HENRY F. KULESZA 
STANLEY SLIWOSKI 



97 



Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and Citizens of the 
Town of Hatfield: 

I hereby submit my seventh annual report as Superin- 
tendent of Schools of Hatfield. 

A number of challenges lie ahead as we move into an- 
other year. School people as well as lay citizens in every 
part of the country are greatly concerned about such 
things as the financial support of the schools, the prepara- 
tion of its students for an age of technology, keeping the 
schools responsive to the will of the people and still pre- 
serving the quality and vitality needed in education, there- 
by making education a powerful force in maintaining peace 
and sustaining the high standard of performance in the 
teaching profession. These and many more problems may 
seem small now, but are definitely destined to be focal 
points around which educational policies will be formulated 
in the years ahead. For those of us in education, this is 
the year to examine the achievements of the past and to 
try to develop policies and procedures that will best serve 
our schools and community in the future. 

This past year has been another year wherein empha- 
sis continued to be placed on upgrading the development of 
technical skills and broadening the background of informa- 
tional knowledge for all children. In the process of reach- 
ing this goal there has been experimentation and the use 
of various media for making learning more meaningful at 
all grade levels in our system. There has been continued 



98 



emphasis on the use of educational aids, utilization of vari- 
ous kinds and types of equipment at all grade levels that 
has reflected itself on the caliber of graduates from our 
school system. 

The impact of the post-war suburban and rural de- 
velopment trend which is sweeping the United States is 
being experienced to some degree in the town of Hatfield. 
The desire to live outside the city, own a home, and enjoy 
the atmosphere of small town living is strong among many 
city residents. Since World War II, over 16 million one- 
family residences have been constructed in this country. 
While our town has not experienced a building explosion, 
it is interesting to observe the number of dwellings that 
have been built in this town since 1950. During this same 
period the public school enrollment has increased from 311 
students in 1950 to 614 students in 1964, or an increase 
of 97.4 'r during this 14-year period. Since the open- 
ing of the new elementary school in 1960, the public school 
enrollment has increased from 496 students in 1960 to 614 
students in 1964, or an increase of 23.8% during this 
4-year period. A growing community faces many prob- 
lems. One of the most critical of these problems is the 
need for replacing or adding school facilities to provide an 
adequate educational program for our growing school en- 
rollment. The existing school buildings are being utilized 
at near maximum capacity. Enrollment projections indi- 
cate that more classrooms will be needed on the secondary 
level in the very near future. Classes are already being 
held in the assembly hall and this is far from ideal. These 
projections do not include the move-in factor and the pos- 
sibility that there will be a need of more classroom space 
on the elementary level shortly, as well as the secondary 
level, which might be far more realistic in future school 
planning. It isn't enough to just write and talk about new 
ideas in education, you need the space in which to cany 
them out. It is important that the town continue a close 



99 



study of future school needs. Careful planning is neces- 
sary well in advance of the actual need for classrooms if 
the correct decisions are to be made concerning financing 
and construction. The stabilization fund shall be in- 
creased as much as possible to help future financing of 
school facilities. Most important, every citizen in the 
town of Hatfield must be kept well informed of the needs 
of educational progress. No school system can be success- 
ful without their support and encouragement. Charts 
concerning past enrollments and predicted future enroll- 
ments follow this report and are placed there for your in- 
formation and consideration. The projection tends to 
support the need for continued study of future school 
needs. It should be emphasized again that these projec- 
tions do not include move-ins and are based on the actual 
count of school children now living in the town of Hatfield. 

Standard tests are given annually for the purpose of 
improving instruction. Median scores that portray 
strengths and weaknesses in basic skills are given not only 
for self-evalution, but also for the purpose of upgrading 
the general educational program and to substantiate the 
teacher's opinions in evaluating, grouping and meeting the 
educational needs of each pupil. We feel that our test re- 
sults are very gratifying, indicating to us how effectively 
we are meeting the needs of our children at all grade levels. 
Results of these tests are available to parents so that they 
and the school may intelligently plan for a student's fu- 
ture. 

This past June, 38 students were graduated and of 
this number, 26 have gone on to further their education. 

The rule regarding the entrance age of pupils is as 
follows: Any child who attains the age of six during the 
year in which entrance to the first grade is sought may 
attend school beginning in September of that year. For 



100 



example : a child having his sixth birthday on any day, in- 
cluding or between January 1, 1965 and December 31, 
1965, may enroll and attend school beginning September 
1965. 

It is the policy of the Hatfield School Department to 
hold regular sessions when it is practicable to operate the 
school buses. Parents are asked to use their own discre- 
tion as to the wisdom of sending their children to school 
on stormy mornings. In the event that it becomes neces- 
sary to cancel school sessions, the "No School Signal" will 
be broadcast over radio station WHMP starting at 6 a.m. 
and continuing through 8:30 a.m. The authorities of 
WHMP request that parents not call the radio station for 
this information, but listen for the announcements. 

National Education Week was observed from Novem- 
ber 8-14, 1964. Special times were set aside through the 
week for private parent-teacher conferences. The schools 
held open house on Thursday evening of that week. The 
large number of parents who scheduled conferences and 
visited the schools was heart-warming and once again it 
showed that interest in the children and schools is high. 
Education Week was concluded with the showing of the 
senior high school play entitled, "Lock, Stock and Lip- 
stick", under the direction of Mr. John Naumowicz of the 
Smith Academy faculty. 

A senior high activities program was started this 
year and is held on Monday afternoons from 2:15 to 3 p.m. 
The program enrolls all the students and presently offers 
the Chess Club, Science Club, Rod and Gun Club, Year- 
book, School Paper, Debating, and Guidance. Also, this 
year, and I believe in the history of the school, we had our 
first National Merit finalist in Stanley Malinowski. Ed- 
ward Dickinson received honorable mention, which is also 
a first for the school. My congratulations to both stu- 



101 

dents. I also wish to express appreciation to the class of 
1964 for its school gift of money for the purchase of refer- 
ence books when a new school plant is available. 

The bus routes were revised in September and the 
routes will be adhered to for the remainder of the year. A 
copy of the present routes follows this report. 

Released time for religious instruction was offered 
again this year. The following times are set aside each 
week so that pupils may benefit from religious instruction 
in denominations of their own choosing. Released time 
started on September 23, 1964, and will end on May 19, 
1965. 

Wednesday 10:45-11:30 Smith Academy students 

Wednesday 12:45 - 1 :30 Grades 6, 7, 8, and 9 

Wednesday 1:50 - 2:40 Grades 2, 3, 4, and 5 

An open-door policy is a vital part of our community- 
centered schools. Our teachers are an integral part of the 
open-door policy and are willing to help any parent. Par- 
ents are invited to visit us and see what and how their 
children learn in the classroom, but are requested to check 
through the principal's office first. 

For a more detailed report about our elementary and 
junior high schools, your attention is directed to Mrs. 
Breor's principal's report. 

In conclusion, may I again express my sincere appre- 
ciation to the members of the Hatfield School Committee, 
Hatfield School Building Committee, all school personnel, 
town officials, town departments, parents, and citizens of 



102 

the town of Hatfield for their loyalty and support during 
the past year. It is your dedication to the principles of 
free public education which has provided excellent educa- 
tional opportunities for the pupils in Hatfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. SKAEZYNSKI 

Superintendent of Schools 



103 



Bus Route 



Junior and Senior High School 

Run #1 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station to Bradstreet, 
left at Bradstreet Cafe to main highway, left down 
Prospect Street, down Chestnut Street, down School 
Street to High School. 

Run #2 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, down Bridge 
Street, up Prospect Street, up Chestnut Street, right 
on main highway to Wolfram's Garage, left to Dickin- 
son's, left, down Pantry Road, down main highway, 
left at State Police Barracks, down Elm Street, with 
no pickups after Ursia residence, down Elm Street, 
down Maple Street, down Main Street to High School. 

Run #3 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, down D wight 
Street, down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down 
Main Street to High School. 

Elementary 

Run #1 

Bus leaves the high school, up School Street, down 
Prospect Street, up Bridge Street, left on Dwight 
Street, right on Elm Street, turn around at town line, 
back down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down Main 
Street to Elementary School. 



104 



Run #2 



Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, up Dwight 
Street, up Elm Street, down main highway to make 
first pickup, left on Linseed Road to Stoddard resi- 
dence, turn around, back down Linseed Road to main 
highway, left, down main highway to Harubin's Serv- 
ice Station. Bus turns around here, takes right at 
Wolfram's Garage to Dickinson's, left down Pantry 
Road, down to main highway, left at and down Chest- 
nut Street, down School Street, down Main Street to 
Elementary School. 



Run #3 



Bus leaves the high school, to Bradstreet to Whately 
town line, turns around, back down River Road, right 
at Bradstreet Cafe, to main highway, left down Pros- 
pect Street, down Chestnut Street, down School 
Street, to Elementary School. 



105 



Principal of the Elementary and 
Junior High Schools 



To the School Committee and the 
Superintendent of Schools : 

I wish to submit this ninth annual report as principal 
of the Center Junior High School and the Hatfield Elemen- 
tary School. 

One of the most valuable and most important addi- 
tions to our educational prog-ram this year was the instal- 
lation of educational television in the elementary school 
last September. The elementary school at that time be- 
came a member of 21 Inch Classroom; therefore, it is 
eligible to receive televised enrichment lessons prepared 
for classroom use. By becoming a member of The 21 Inch 
Classroom, Hatfield has joined with over 190 school sys- 
tems to participate in one of the finest school television 
projects in the country. 

The installation was not a costly one, because the 
building committee had the foresight to have each class- 
room wired and ready for educational television when the 
school was built. The cost of providing these televised 
programs is twenty-five cents per pupil, which provides 
each teacher with the scheduled programs and lesson plans 
and guides for her particular grade. The portable tele- 
vision sets were purchased by the School Committee with 
the federal government paying 50% of the cost through 
NDEA — Title III. 



106 



With four portable classroom sets and one auditorium 
installation, classrooms have a valuable supplement to the 
regular daily lessons. A great wealth of materials and re- 
source people are brought to the classroom to enrich the 
educational curriculum. 

Exceptional programs by master teachers are offered 
in science, social studies, reading, literature, mathematics, 
French, music, phonics, and art. In addition to these, the 
junior and senior high have access to programs in social 
studies, current events, science, and literature. 

Programs are scheduled at least twice so that very 
little adjustment of the classroom schedule is necessary. 
The programs are selected by the classroom teacher so 
that they correlate with the classroom work. 

The only difficulty we have encountered is the ar- 
rangement of program schedules for the junior high. 
Since the time schedule is different and classes move with 
the bell system, quite a few adjustments in the junior 
high schedule are necessary. 

The State Department of Education, Department of 
Foreign Languages, conducted a foreign workshop at the 
Center Junior High School this past summer from August 
17 to August 21 with Mr. Ernest Frechette, Supervisor in 
Education, Modern Foreign Languages, conducting the 
workshop, assisted by Mrs. Freeman, Supervisor of the 
Language Laboratory and Instructor at M.I.T. 

The morning sessions were devoted to instructions, 
using the following topics : Orientation, Organization of 
Language, Pattern Practice or Structural Drill, Adapta- 
tion of Conventional Materials and Additional Course Sup- 
plementary Materials. 



107 

The afternoon sessions were completely involved with 
equipment, its uses, and its operations. The students 
from many cities and towns throughout Massachusetts 
learned the processes of recording, playback, and erasing. 
They became familiar with the student operations in the 
laboratory and the teacher's responsibility at the console. 
Individualized practice was given in testing, copying, edit- 
ing, and making a tape. The instructors also acquainted 
the students with the latest modern language materials 
that are available and new methods and techniques that 
can be used successfully in the classroom. The workshop 
was very successful and very informative. 

A new modern mathematics program has been intro- 
duced in the eighth grade. Exploring Modern Mathema- 
tics, according to the author, is based on the work of the 
University of Maryland Mathematics Project and the 
School Mathematics Study Group. Arithmetic, algebra, 
and geometry have been integrated wherever practical to 
eliminate the artificial distinction among them. The stu- 
dents have the opportunity to study mathematical struc- 
ture which is so important for understanding. The stu- 
dents work with many kinds of applied problems and 
proofs, which should help them in their studies in more in- 
volved mathematics at the high school. Much new termi- 
nology is used for the purpose of clarifying ideas and pro- 
viding better communication. Students in this program 
are left to discover and explore new concepts by them- 
selves. 

This year we are using the first of the series with the 
eighth grade, but next year we anticipate using the series 
in grades seven and eight with the better mathematical 
students. 

During the past year the elementary teachers worked 
on committees for the express purpose of selecting new 



108 

textbooks in English and in science. After reviewing 
many different texts in these areas from various publish- 
ers, selections were made. The School Committee pur- 
chased English books for grades two, four, and six. New 
science texts were introduced in the other grades. Next 
year we expect to purchase in the reverse order, so that by 
September of 1965 all grades will have new science and 
English textbooks. 

The Ginn Reading Series was introduced in grades 
two through six as a co-basal series. These materials are 
primarily used for the highest achievers in reading in each 
grade, although they have been used for pupils who need 
to reinforce their learnings at a certain level. 

The first grades have received new arithmetic text- 
books, which offer a more comprehensive study at this 
level. It is the feeling of educators throughout the nation 
that children are capable of comprehending and using 
arithmetical concepts in greater depth at the elementary 
level. 

The junior and senior high school students have a 
time schedule change on Monday to provide time for extra- 
curricular activities from 2:15 to 3. In previous years, 
when the activity period was held during the seventh peri- 
od on each Friday, many major areas of study lost forty- 
five minutes a week or 180 minutes a month. Although 
the activities are a vital and necessary part of each stu- 
dent's curriculum, they should not interfere with any 
scholastic program of the student. This change has been 
very successful at the junior high with students and 
teachers accepting the change willingly. 

The music supervisor now comes to the Hatfield 
schools two and a half days a week. This increase of a 
half day each week means that all divisions of the classes, 



109 

including the ninth grades, can meet with the supervisor 
at least once a week. At the elementary level, there is no 
longer interference with the physical education program. 
All music classes are now held in the morning, thus free- 
ing the all-purpose room for physical education in the af- 
ternoon. 

From November eighth through the fourteenth, the 
nation observed American Education Week. "Education 
Pays Dividends" was the theme. The Hatfield Elementary 
and Junior High Schools scheduled conferences with par- 
ents every afternoon on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Friday from 2 to 4. Each conference was fifteen minutes 
in length. The elementary conferences were arranged for 
all parents, and more than ninety per cent of these parents 
came and were interested in their children's progress at 
school. For the first time, we had the parents of junior 
high students, who were interested in a conference, fill in 
the time schedule themselves. Although parents were in- 
vited and urged to visit the school and to participate in the 
conferences, few junior high parents availed themselves of 
this opportunity. Those parents whose children are doing 
most satisfactory work outnumbered the parents of stu- 
dents that are having difficulties. These private meetings 
with the teachers acquainted the parents with the 
strengths and weaknesses of the child, his progress, his 
habits, and his attitudes. The conference period fostered 
a better understanding of the school and its goals. By 
working together, the home and school can help the child 
to progress in his educational program. 

Thursday evening the schools were open for visits to 
the classrooms so that parents and friends in education 
could acquaint themselves with the material used in the 
schools. 

It is necessary to acquaint parents with our promo- 
tion policy. As we all know, children do not develop or pro- 



110 

gress at the same rate, either emotionally, socially, men- 
tally, or physically. Therefore, children will not achieve at 
the same rate. At the end of a school year, all pupils have 
not mastered the basic skills necessary for success in the 
next grade. Therefore, it is our policy to give an under- 
achiever in the primary grades an opportunity to acquire 
the basic skills necessary for progress at the next level by 
repeating the grade or by repeating a certain subject. It 
is difficult for parents to understand or to accept this fact, 
but as educators it is our responsibility to do everything 
possible to help each child succeed. We have never made a 
decision without carefully weighing all aspects of the situ- 
ation. Decisions are made after consultation with the 
teacher, administration, and parent. 

If a child in the intermediate grades has not worked 
to capacity, has a poor attitude, or conduct that interferes 
with his classroom work, then the school has the responsi- 
bility to study the problem and to make a decision that is 
best. This could be a decision to have the child repeat the 
grade or to have him placed in the next grade. The men- 
tal, physical, social, and emotional development of each 
student is considered. 

In the junior high the students must repeat a grade if 
their marks in two or more subjects are below 65. In the 
ninth grade a student must have passed three or more sub- 
jects in order to qualify as a sophomore. The student 
must have three credits entering his sophomore year. If 
a student fails in an area, he cannot continue in other ad- 
vanced courses in that field until the subject has been re- 
peated. 

Under NDEA, Title III, new equipment and audio- 
visual aids have been purchased in science, foreign lan- 
guages, and mathematics for both the elementary and jun- 
ior high schools. Reference books, such as the World Book 



Ill 

Encyclopedias, have been added to the classrooms at the 
elementary school and to the junior high library. Again, 
we wish to thank Mr. Harry Blauvelt and the Misses Ma- 
rion and Louisa Billings for their contributions to the jun- 
ior high library. Both additions are excellent reference 
materials for the students. 

At this time, I would like to thank the staff at the 
Hatfield Public Library for the assistance they have given 
to the students and teachers at both schools. 

Throughout the junior high the hallways have been 
painted and the woodwork varnished. All the woodwork 
in the classrooms on the first floor has been refinished. 
The French room has been completely repainted. All nec- 
essary adjustments have been made to the furnace at the 
junior high to make operation more efficient. 

In the elementary school the window sash have been 
painted inside and outside. Teachers' wardrobe doors 
have been refinished, and the inside of the children's ward- 
robes has been painted. 

In closing, may I express my sincere thanks to the 
school committee, the superintendent of schools, the teach- 
ing staff, the custodians, parents, cafeteria staff, pupils, 
and interested citizens for their assistance throughout the 
school year. The spirit of co-operation has done much to 
make the school year a rewarding and successful one. 



Respectfully submitted, 

DOROTHY M. BREOR 

Principal 



112 



School Savings 



For the past 16 years the Florence Savings Bank, 
Nonotuck Saving's Bank and Northampton Institution for 
Savings have sponsored a School Savings program in the 
schools. 

In the Elementary and Center schools, regular School 
Savings is conducted on Tuesdays of each week and in 
Smith Academy a Club program is offered on Mondays. 

The Club program consists of 50 $ or $1 weekly de- 
posits. The 50^ club amounts to $25 and the $1 club, $50 
— upon expiration. When all 50 payments have been 
made the money may be received by presenting the paid- 
up book at the bank. If the student prefers, the amount 
will be credited to his savings account. 

These clubs are especially beneficial for the many 
graduation expenses ; the initial college requirements and/ 
or as a regular savings plan. 

In the Elementary and Center schools any amount 
from 5^ up may be deposited weekly on Tuesdays. Several 
times during the year money is transferred to regular in- 
terest-bearing savings accounts. 



113 

Last year $11,284 was banked in Hatfield schools. 

Proper student encouragement for weekly saving is 
necessary and it is hoped that the parents and the teach- 
ers will offer this stimulation. 



Respectfully submitted, 

(MRS.) V. S. CONNORS 
School Savings Director 



114 



School Health 



To the Superintendent and 
School Committee of Hatfield : 

I herewith submit my annual report, the 13th, as 
the school nurse of Hatfield. 

Health is a universal phenomenon that touches in 
some way every activity of our lives. The energy we ex- 
press in learning, working, and every phase of living, is a 
reflection of our vitality levels. Children must be healthy 
in order to profit most from schooling. The major purpose 
of school health services is to improve the educability of 
the children. Screening tests for Visual and Hearing 
handicaps, physical examinations to detect any other kind 
of health problem, and preventative measures for the con- 
trol of communicable disease, are among the major serv- 
ices offered each child. 

Physical examinations have been completed. Dis- 
abilities and defects which were found were brought to the 
attention of the parents. 

The Vision test was given to 590 pupils with 39 fail- 
ing the retest. Of this number 32 were seen by an eye 
specialist and received correction, while 7 did not report. 

The Pure Tone hearing test was given to 589 pupils 
with 20 failing the retest. Of this number 15 were seen 
by an ear specialist while 5 failed to report. 



115 

The Tine Tuberculosis test was administered in May 
to children of grades 1, 4, 8 and 12. There were 183 
eligible to participate. The report is as follows : 



Total number tested 


176 


Negative reaction 


172 


Positive reaction 


4 


Refused test 


7 



All four positive reactors were X-rayed and the reports 
were returned as negative. 

As a prophylactic measure, flu vaccine was again of- 
fered to the faculty. Twenty-nine members received the 
vaccine in October. 

Adult Boosters for the prevention of Tetanus and 
Diphtheria were given to 34 members of the Senior Class 
in May. 

Registration for incoming first grade children was 
held in May with 49 children reporting. 

The annual census of all children under 16 years of 
age, living in Hatfield, was completed in October. The an- 
nual census of physically handicapped children was com- 
pleted in November and the report was sent to the State 
Department of Education. 

Communicable diseases reported during the year are 
as follows : 

Chicken Pox 9 Mumps 19 

German Measles 297 



116 

My sincerest appreciation is extended to the physi- 
cians, school officials, teachers, and parents for their as- 
sistance and co-operation in the school health program. 



Respectfully submitted, 

LUCILLE H. GODEK, R.N. 



117 



School Lunch 



Our nation produces food in abundance greater than 
any nation in history — an abundance more than sufficient 
to provide every American today with a tasty, nutritious, 
and healthful diet. An adequate nutrition is essential if 
our Nation's youth is to achieve optimum health and 
physical fitness and enhance its ability to derive maxi- 
mum benefit from the educational process. Under the Na- 
tional School Lunch Program, national, state, and commu- 
nity efforts are being made to insure that an adequate and 
nutritious school lunch is available each school day, to 
school children, regardless of family or neighborhood in- 
come. Some 17 million youngsters now eat well-balanced 
lunches in more than 68,000 school lunchrooms operated 
for them by local people. The operation of this school 
lunch program is made possible by the employment of the 
unexcelled skills and techniques of a highly developed 
marketing system, and results in the consumption of tre- 
mendous quantities of food produced by our farmers. 
Therefore, we should all give deserved recognition to the 
role of the school lunch program in building a stronger 
America through serving its youth. 

Our program is one that the town can be proud of. 
We have an extremely high lunch participation. The 
meals are well planned, tasty, and well received by the stu- 
dents. The manager and staff give that home touch and 
do their best to make the lunch and lunchroom a pleasant 
experience for our students. The school cafeterias are 
presently staffed by the following women : Mrs. Winifred 



118 

Betsold, manager, and Mrs. Hazel Roberts, assistant man- 
ager. Their assistants are Mrs. Susan Zima, Mrs. Wanda 
Shea, Mrs. Helen Kugler, Mrs. Bertha Kosakowski, Mrs. 
Rita Osley and Mrs. Mary Vachula. 

The cafeterias serve a "Type A" lunch that meets the 
requirements of the National School Lunch Program. The 
child gets one-third of his daily nutritional requirements. 
A "Type A" lunch contains as a minimum: two ounces 
cooked, lean meat, poultry or fish or two ounces of cheese ; 
one egg or one-half cup cooked dry beans or dry peas, or 
four tablespoons of peanut butter or an equivalent quan- 
tity of a combination of two of these items, served in a 
main dish or in a main dish and one other menu item ; 
three-fourths cup serving of two or more vegetables or 
fruits, or both ; one slice enriched bread or the equivalent ; 
two teaspoons butter; one-half pint whole, unflavored 
milk. No dessert is required, but we include one with 
every hot lunch served. Special attention is given to in- 
clude adequate servings of Vitamin C rich food daily and 
Vitamin A food twice a week. 

The cafeteria personnel once again attended the state 
sponsored School Lunch Conferences this year. 

Equipment and utensils have been purchased for both 
cafeterias. 

The menus of the school lunch program are published 
in the daily newspapers and are also posted in the class- 
rooms. The hot lunch is served for 25$ and the amount of 
food value received for this price is the best bargain one 
can get. The elementary and junior high pupils are super- 
vised by the homeroom teachers, with over-all supervision 
by the principal, Mrs. Dorothy Breor. The high school 
students are supervised by the high school teachers with 
over-all supervision by the high school principal, Mr. John 
A. Skarzynski. 



119 



The financial account of the lunch program can be 
found in the town accountant's report which appears in 
another section of this town report. 

The following is an accounting of the number of 
lunches served during the past year : 





Days 
Lunch Served 


No. of 
Lunches Served 


January- 


21 


10,182 


February 


14 


6,545 


March 


21 


10,296 


April 


17 


8,337 


May 


21 


10,272 


June 


11 


5,288 


September 


16 


8,771 


October 


20 


10,970 


November 


17 


9,321 


December 


16 


8,752 



174 



88,734 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI 
Director, Hatfield School Lunch 



120 







Total 
11 Grade* 

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122 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 1964 

Regular Day School 

Regular Day School : 

Appropriation for support $223,760.00 

Unexpended balance, returned 

to Surplus Cash 1,163.38 



Total Expenditures 

for support $222,596.62 

Expenditures from P. L. 874 931.32 

Expenditures from P. L. 864 8,967.38 



Total Expenditures $232,495.32 

Credits : Reimbursements to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 
General School Fund (Chap. 70) $ 31,385.00 
Transportation (Chap. 71) 6,094.65 



Total reimbursement for regular day school 

to Town of Hatfield from Commonwealth $ 37,479.65 
Credits : Reimbursement to School Committee 
from Federal Government : 
Federal Law — P. L. 874 $ 8,414.00 

Federal Law — P. L. 864 8,970.73 



Total reimbursement to School Committee 

received from Federal Government $ 17,384.73 

Vocational Tuition and Transportation 

Vocational Tuition and Transportation : 

Appropriation for support $ 10,598.94 

Unexpended balance, returned 

to Surplus Cash 2,730.45 



Total support $ 7,868.49 



123 



Credits : Reimbursements to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
Vocational Tuition and Transportation : 
Vocational Tuition $ 3,226.12 

Vocational Transportation 640.50 



Total reimbursement for Vocational Tuition 
and Transportation to Town of Hatfield from 
Commonwealth $ 3,866.62 



124 



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125 



HATFIELD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 


SCHOOL BUDGET ESTIMATE 


1965 




General Control — 1000 


$ 6,595.00 


Instruction — 2000 


181,677.00 


Operation — 4000 


26,905.00 


Maintenance and Repair — 4000 


4,965.00 


Capital Outlay — 7000 


1,200.00 


Other Agencies — 3000 


16,925.00 


Total 1965 Budget Estimate 


$238,267.00 


1965 BUDGET ESTIMATE 


General Control 


1000 




Superintendent's Salary 


$ 3,800.00 


Superintendent's Expenses 


300.00 


Superintendent's Expenses — 




National Convention 


175.00 


Office Expenses 


225.00 


Census 


80.00 


Work Certificates 


300.00 


Clerk 


1,650.00 


Co-operative School Service 




Center 


65.00 


Total 


$ 6,595.00 


Instruction 


2000 




Salaries : 




Elementary Salaries 


$ 73,668.00 


Junior High Salaries 


45,834.00 


Secondary Salaries 


48,640.00 



126 

Instruction — Handicapped 



Children 


500.00 


Penmanship, Art, Music 


3,200.00 


Elementary Instructional Supplies, 




Texts, etc. : 




Elementary Instr. Supplies $ 


3,710.00 


ETV Membership 


90.00 


Elementary Principal's Expenses 


50.00 


Elementary A. V. Aids 


100.00 


Elementary Office Expenses 


50.00 


Junior High Instructional Supplies, 




Texts, etc. : 




Junior High Instr. Supplies 


2,220.00 


Junior High Principal's Expenses 


50.00 


Junior High A. V. Aids 


100.00 


Junior High Office Expenses 


50.00 


Secondary Instructional Supplies, 




Texts, etc. : 




Secondary Instr. Supplies 


2,870.00 


Secondary Principal's Expenses 


125.00 


Driver Education Supplies 


250.00 


Secondary A. V. Aids 


100.00 


Secondary Office Expenses 


90.00 


Total 


$181,677.00 


Operation 




4000 




Elementary Janitor's Salary $ 


4,800.00 


Junior High Janitor's Salary 


4,200.00 


Secondary Janitor's Salary 


3,800.00 


Elementary Fuel 


2,900.00 


Junior High Fuel 


2,100.00 



127 



Secondary Fuel 

Misc. Operational, Elementary 
Misc. Operational, Junior High 
Misc. Operational, Secondary 
Town Hall, Janitor's Supplies 
Telephone Service, Elementary 
Telephone Service, Junior High 
Telephone Service, Secondary 




1,100.00 

5,000.00 

1,150.00 

1,050.00 

160.00 

185.00 

190.00 

270.00 




Total $ 26,905.00 

Maintenance and Repairs 
4000 

Elementary School $ 1,695.00 
ETV Maint. and Repairs 110.00 
Junior High School 2,660.00 
High School 170.00 
Maint. Classroom Typewriters 230.00 
School Street School 100.00 


Total 

Capital Outlay 
7000 

New Equipment $ 
Alterations 


$ 

1,100.00 
100.00 


4,965.00 


Total $ 

Other Agencies 
3000 

Transportation $11,100.00 
Transportation — Athletic 1,000.00 
Salary of Nurse 2,500.00 
Nurse's Expenses 100.00 


1,200.00 



128 



Health Supplies 


90.00 


School Library — Elementary- 


125.00 


School Library — Junior High 


125.00 


School Library — Secondary 


125.00 


Physical Education 


700.00 


Athletic Insurance 


455.00 


School Vehicles 


200.00 


Graduation 


230.00 


Insurance — Liability 


50.00 


Miscellaneous 


125.00 


Total 


$ 16,925.00 


TOTAL BUDGET ESTIMATE 


$238,267.00 



1964 



Sept. 


8 


Sept. 


9 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


26 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


25 


Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


23 



129 

HATFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

1964 - 1965 



Staff meeting — 9 :30 a.m. 

Schools open — full sessions 

Columbus Day — no school 

Teachers' Convention — no school 

Veterans' Day — no school 

Thanksgiving recess 

Schools close at noon — no lunch 

Schools open — full sessions 

Christmas recess 

Schools close at noon — no lunch 



1965 

Schools reopen — full sessions 

Schools close for winter vacation 

Schools reopen — full sessions 

Good Friday — no school 

Patriots Day — no school 

Schools reopen — full sessions 

Memorial Day — no school 
June 17 Elementary pupils dismissed with report cards. 

Teachers will report until closing details com- 
pleted. 
June 18 Junior and Senior High School students dis- 
missed with report cards. 

Teachers will report until closing details com- 
pleted. 

High School Graduation 

Elementary School — 182 days 

Junior and Senior High School — 183 days 



Jan. 


4 


Feb. 


19 


Mar. 


1 


Apr. 


16 


Apr. 


19 


Apr. 


20 


May 


31 



130 



Director of Accounts Report 



To the Board of Selectmen : 
Mr. Stanley J. Filipek, Chairman 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the period from 
March 1, 1963 to February 29, 1964, made in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is 
in the form of a report made to me by Mr. William 
Schwartz, Assistant Chief of Bureau. 



Very truly yours, 

ARTHUR H. MacKINNON 
Director of Accounts 



131 



Mr. Arthur H. MacKinnon 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an 
audit of the books and accounts of the town of Hatfield for 
the period from March 1, 1963, the date of the previous 
audit, to February 29, 1964, and submit the following" re- 
port thereon : 

The records of financial transactions of the several 
departments receiving or disbursing town funds or com- 
mitting bills for collection were examined and checked in 
detail. 

The surety bonds of the several town officials required 
by law to furnish them for the faithful performance of 
their duties were examined and found to be in proper 
form. 

The books and accounts in the accountant's office were 
examined and checked. The recorded receipts were com- 
pared with the treasurer's books and with the records in 
the several departments collecting money for the town, 
while the payments, as entered, were checked with the 
treasurers' books and with the treasury warrants. The 
appropriations were checked with the town clerk's records 
of town meetings, and the transfers from the reserve fund 
were compared with the authorizations of the finance com- 
mittee. 

The ledger accounts were analyzed, the necessary ad- 
justments resulting from the audit were made, and a 
balance sheet showing the financial condition of the town 
on February 29, 1964 was prepared and is appended to this 
report. 



132 



The books and accounts of the town treasurer were 
examined and checked. The recorded receipts were 
checked with the records of the departments making pay- 
ments to the treasurer and with other sources from which 
money was paid into the town treasury, while the pay- 
ments were compared with the warrants authorizing the 
disbursement of town funds. The cash book additions 
were verified and the cash balance on February 29, 1964 
was proved by reconciliation of the bank balances with 
statements furnished by the banks of deposit and by 
actual count of the cash in the office. 

The payments on account of maturing debt and in- 
terest were compared with the amounts falling due dur- 
ing the period of the audit and were checked with the can- 
celled securities and coupons on file. The coupons out- 
standing on February 29, 1964 were listed and checked 
with the amount on deposit in the bond and coupon 
account. 

The records of payroll deductions for Federal and 
State taxes, the county retirement system, and group in- 
surance were examined. The deductions were listed, the 
payments to the proper agencies were verified, and the 
balances in the general treasury were proved with the re- 
spective controls in the accountant's ledger. 

The savings bank books representing the investment 
of the trust and investment funds in the custody of the 
town treasurer were examined and listed, the bequests and 
income were proved, and the withdrawals were compared 
with the treasurer's record of receipts. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked. The tax and excise accounts out- 
standing at the time of the previous examination, as well 
as all subsequent commitment lists, were audited and 



133 

proved with the assessors' warrants issued for their col- 
lection. The recorded collections were checked, the pay- 
ments to the treasurer were verified, the abatements were 
compared with the records of the assessors, and the out- 
standing- accounts were listed and proved with the 
accountant's ledger. The cash balance on February 29, 
1964 was proved by actual count of the cash in the office. 

It is again recommended that action be taken to ob- 
tain a prompt settlement of the delinquent tax and excise 
accounts which date back to 1959. 

The records of departmental and water accounts re- 
ceivable were examined and checked. The commitments 
were verified, the recorded collections were proved with 
the payments to the treasurer, the abatements were com- 
pared with the departmental records, and the outstanding- 
accounts were listed, checked with the available records in 
the several departments, and reconciled with the town 
accountant's ledger controls. The cash on hand in the wa- 
ter department on February 29, 1964 was proved by actual 
count. 

Attention is again called to the delinquent accounts in 
the water and cemetery departments, and it is again 
recommended that the departments concerned take 
prompt action to effect a complete settlement of these 
accounts. 

To further verify the outstanding tax, excise, depart- 
mental, and water accounts, notices were sent to a num- 
ber of persons whose names appeared on the books as 
owing money to the town and from the replies received it 
appears that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The receipts of the town clerk for dog and sporting 
licenses, as well as for gasoline renewals, were checked 



134 

with the records of licenses and permits granted. The 
payments to the town treasurer and to the Division of 
Fisheries and Game were verified, and the cash on hand 
February 29, 1964 was proved by actual count. 

The appropriations, as voted by the town meetings, 
were listed from the records of the town clerk and com- 
pared with the aggregate amounts raised by the assessors 
in the computation of the tax rate for 1963. 

The records of receipts of the selectmen and the seal- 
er of weights and measures, as well as of the police, high- 
way, school, and library departments, and of all other de- 
partments collecting money for the town, were examined 
and checked. The payments to the treasurer were 
checked with the treasurer's cash receipts and with the 
records of the town accountant, while the cash on hand in 
the several departments was verified by actual count. 

Appended to this report, in addition to the balance 
sheet, are tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's 
cash, summaries of the tax, excise, departmental, and wa- 
ter accounts, as well as schedules showing the transactions 
and condition of the trust and investment funds. 

During the progress of the audit cooperation was ex- 
tended by all town officials, for which, on behalf of my 
assistants and for myself, I wish to express appreciation. 



Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM SCHWARTZ 
Assistant Chief of Bureau 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 3 J, 1965 



Printed by 

Gazette Printing Co., Inc. 

Northampton, Mass. 



Town Officers for 1965 



SELECTMEN 



Stanley J. Filipek, Chairman 
Michael A. Yanginski George W. Rogalewski 

MODERATOR 

Gordon A. Woodward 

TOWN CLERK-TREASURER 

Peter S. Rogaleski 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Mitchell W. Kempisty, Chairman 
Richard D. Belden Joseph S. Wilkes 

TAX COLLECTOR 

Thomas L. Mullany 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Stanley Sliwoski, Chairman 
Henry F. Kulesza Ethel I. Byrne 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Ralph F. Vollinger, Chairman 
Rupert Harubin John R. Rudy 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Arthur Cory Bardwell, Chairman 
Clifford L. Belden, Jr. Henry F. Szych 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Margaret ML Wentzel, Chairman 
Dorothy Breor Michael M. Majeskey 



ELECTOR UNDER THE WILL OF OLIVER SMITH 

Frank T. Woodward 

TREE WARDEN 

Francis E. Godin 

PLANNING BOARD 

Francis H. Hebert, Chairman 
William H. Burke, Jr. Henry F. Szych 

Henry M. Kugler, Jr. Stanley Sliwoski 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Thaddeus Kabat, Chairman 
Chester S. Prucnal William E. Boyle 

Alternates 

Harold Lyman Edward S. Kowalski 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Atty. Elizabeth A. Porada 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

William S. Olszewski, Chairman 
Joseph V. Porada, Jr. Edward J. Wickles 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Howard B. Abbott, Chairman 

Joseph J. Pelc Peter S. Rogaleski 

Edward T. Kostek 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Gertrude B. Rogaleski 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

Joseph J. Deres 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS & SLAUGHTER 

Frank Sikorski, Jr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Edward S. Wroblewski 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS 

Charles J. Eberlein, Sr. 

COLLECTOR OF WATER RENTS 

Harold B. Lizek 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

John A. Skarzynski 



6 

DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Thomas P. Mullins 

WOOD SURVEYORS 

Bernard Donnis Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Joseph V. Porada Peter Kubosiak 

John Osley, Jr. Elizabeth Porada 

Clifford L. Belden, Jr. 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Paul Stef ancik 

FENCE VIEWERS AND FIELD DRIVERS 

Michael M. Majeskey Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Henry J. Sliwoski 

CONSTABLES 

Heniy Sliwoski Mitchell Kempisty 

James E. McGrath Peter Kubosiak 

Joseph S. Wilkes Stanley J. Filipek 

Henry Kosakowski John Brennan 

George W. Rogalewski William Podmayer 

Anthony Malinowski Peter Backiel 

Stanley Malinowski George Omasta 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Anthony Sikorski Adolf Ciszewski 

William Symanski Stanley Jagodzinski 



Harry Lizek 
William Slowikowski 
Stanley Symanski 
David Omasta 



John Szych 



SPECIAL POLICE 

Joseph Deres 

FIRE CHIEF 

Myron J. Sikorski 



Robert Thayer 

Ralph Vollinger 

Frank Godek 

Thaddeus Rabat 



FIREFIGHTERS 

Main Street Station 

Kempisty, Edward, Deputy Chief 

Proulx, Alfred, Deputy Chief 

Boyle, William, Captain 

Pickunka, Walter, Jr., Lt. 

Kotch, Peter, Lt. 

Shaw, Bernard 

Pelis, Bernard 

Boyle, Marcus 

Gizinski, John 

Rogaleski, John 

Korza, William 

Pease, Marshall 



Szych, Joseph 

Szych, Henry 

Lizek, David 

Shea, Robert 

Balise, Kenneth 

Vollinger, Richard 

Petrowicz, Richard 

Petrowicz, Charles 

Vollinger, Donald 

Zgrodnik, George 

Osepowicz, Robert 



North Hatfield Station 

Smiarowski, Teddy 
Belden, Clifford, Asst. Chief 
Belden, Richard, Captain 
Symanski, Anthony 
Sysun, Connie 



Bielunis, Adam 

Maiewski, Philip 

Kubilis, Louis 

Besko, John, Jr. 
Omasta, Michael 



8 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Incorporated 1670 

AREA 

8900 Acres 

ELEVATION 

132 Feet at Main Street 

POPULATION 

1965 Census — 2708 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Second Hampshire District 

JOHN D. BARRUS 

Goshen, Mass. 

STATE SENATOR 

Franklin & Hampshire District 

CHARLES A. BISBEE, JR. 
Chesterfield, Mass. 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

First Congressional District 

SILVIO 0. CONTE 
Pittsfield, Mass. 

SENATORS IN CONGRESS 

LEVERETT J. SALTONSTALL 
Dover, Mass. 

EDWARD M. KENNEDY 

Boston, Mass. 



Selectmen's Warrant 



Hampshire, ss. 

To either of the constables of the Town of Hatfield in 
said County, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to meet in 
Memorial Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 21st 
day of February next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then 
and there to take action under Article 1, and to meet at 
seven o'clock in the evening to take action on all other 
articles : 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for 
the ensuing year : Moderator for three years ; one Select- 
man for three years ; Town Treasurer for three years ; Tax 
Collector for three years; one member of the Board of 
Assessors for three years; one member of the School 
Committee for three years; one member of the Board of 
Water Commissioners for three years; Tree Warden for 
three years; one member of the Library Trustees for 
three years; Elector under the Will of Oliver Smith for 
one year; one member of the Cemetery Commissioners 
for three years; one member of the Planning Board for 
five years; one member of the Sewer Commission for 
three years; one member of the Sewer Commission for 
two years ; one member of the Sewer Commission for one 
year and four members of the Hatfield Housing Authority. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon 
and kept open until eight o'clock in the evening. 



10 

Article 2. To hear and discuss all reports or sub- 
jects which have to do with the welfare of the town, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 3. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year, beginning January 1, 1966, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year, in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws and 
amendments thereto. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $256.54 received from the Dog Fund to the 
Library Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $587.50 from the State Aid for Libraries Ac- 
count to the Library Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer such sums of money as shall 
be deemed necessary to defray the current expenses of the 
financial year and set the salaries of all elected officials in 
accordance with the provisions of Section 108, Chapter 41, 
General Laws, or act anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer the sum of $5,124.73 as allocated 
by the actuary and certified by the County Commissioners 
to the Town of Hatfield under the provisions of Chapter 
32, General Laws, as amended, and pay said amount to the 
Treasurer-Custodian of the Hampshire County Retire- 
ment System. 



11 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to co-operate with the County and State 
under the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, the town's 
share, for improvement of Chapter 90 highways, and to 
appropriate the sum of $2,000.00, the State and County 
share, in anticipation of reimbursement from the State 
and County ; the town's share to be raised by taxation and 
the State and County share to be taken from Surplus 
Revenue and returned to same when reimbursement is 
received, or act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to co-operate with the State under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 81, General Laws, and to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $8,500.00, the town's share, and to 
appropriate the sum of $14,025.00, the State's share, in 
anticipation of reimbursement from the State, the town's 
share to be raised by taxation and the State's share to be 
taken from Surplus Revenue and returned to same when 
reimbursement is received, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to author- 
ize the Selectmen to co-operate with the State and County 
under the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $4,500.00, the town's 
share, for new construction on School, Chestnut and King 
Streets, and to appropriate the sum of $13,500.00, the 
State and County share, in anticipation of reimbursement 
from the State and County, also to transfer the sum of 
$6,397.92 (Balance of Chapter 822, Acts of 1963 monies) 
from the King Street Construction Account, to new con- 
struction on School, Chestnut and King Streets, the town's 
share to be raised by taxation and the State and County 
share to be taken from Surplus Revenue and returned to 
same when reimbursement is received, or act anything 
thereon. 



12 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to appro- 
priate from monies allotted under Chapter 679, Acts of 
1965 the sum of $8,361.16 for new construction on King, 
School and Chestnut Streets, or act anything thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to appro- 
priate from the Machinery Earnings Account the sum of 
$400.00 for the purchase of a new Water Pump for the 
Highway Department, or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to appro- 
priate from the Machinery Earnings Account the sum of 
$650.00 for the purchase of a new Road Line Marker for 
the Highway Department, or act anything thereon. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer the sum of $215.00 for the 
purchase of a Check Protector for the Town Treasurer's 
department, or act anything thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to place 
street lights in the following locations : 

At the residence of John Besko, Jr., Depot Road, 
Bradstreet, 

At the residence of Louis Kubilis, Mountain 
Road, North Hatfield, 

At the foot of Route 91 overpass at Elm Street, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to purchase 
or take by eminent domain approximately 632 sq. feet of 
land at the corner of Chestnut and Prospect Streets in the 
Town of Hatfield from William E. and Marcus J. Boyle, 
and to raise and appropriate and/or transfer the sum of 
$100.00 for this purpose or act anything thereon. 



13 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to extend 
the water main on Straits Road approximately 380 feet 
in a northerly direction to the Hatfield- Whately town line 
and to appropriate the sum of $770.00 from Water Avail- 
able Surplus for this purpose, or act anything thereon. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to author- 
ize the Moderator to appoint a committee of ten to formu- 
late preliminary plans for the observance of Hatfield's 
300th anniversary in 1970, or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer the sum of $600.00 for the 
Youth League, or act anything thereon. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer a sum of money for the pur- 
chase of a combination cruiser and ambulance for the 
Police Department, or act anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer the sum of $16,000.00 for the 
purchase of a new fire truck for the Fire Department, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer the sum of $5,000.00 for the 
purchase of a two-way Radio Communication System to 
be used jointly by the Police, Fire and Highway Depart- 
ments, or act anything thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to accept 
the provisions of Chapter 478, Acts of 1963, "An Act In- 
creasing the Amounts of Pensions and Retirement Allow- 
ances Payable to Certain Former Public Employees," or 
act anything thereon. 



14 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to empower 
the School Building Committee, whose members are Thad- 
deus L. Kabat, John A. Skarzynski, Richard D. Belden, 
Mrs. Ethel Byrne, William H. Burke, Jr., Stanley J. Fili- 
pek, William S. Olszewski, Joseph V. Porada, Jr., Eugene 
F. Proulx, Raymond Russell and Stanley Sliwoski, to 
draw preliminary plans and prepare a complete cost esti- 
mate for the construction of a high school on property 
designated as the Blauvelt property and such adjacent 
property as needed for the construction of a high school 
off the northerly side of School Street, such plans to be 
consistent with requirements of the Mass. School Build- 
ing Assistance Commission and to raise and/or appro- 
priate the sum of $6,000.00 for the drafting of preliminary 
plans and the preparation of a complete cost estimate for 
said high school or take any action relative thereto. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by post- 
ing attested copies thereof in five public places in the 
Town of Hatfield, seven days before time of said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time 
and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 25th day of January in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
sixty-six. 



STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
MICHAEL A. YANGINSKI 
GEORGE W. ROGALEWSKI 

Selectmen of Hatfield 



15 





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Highway Chap. 81 
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20 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Hatfield : 

We respectfully submit our annual report for the 
year 1966. 

Main Street was again resurfaced this year under 
Chapter 90 Maintenance for more than a quarter of a 
mile, making a big improvement in the center around the 
town buildings, and the Hatfield Business Center Building. 

Chapter 90 New Construction work on School and 
Chestnut Streets changed locations of existing roads and 
made Chestnut Street a thruway to ease traffic flow from 
the town's center to Route 5. King Street reconstruction 
should be completed during 1966, and Chestnut Street re- 
construction will be continued. Elm, Maple and Main 
Streets were marked by the highway department. 

A new front-end loader was purchased for the high- 
way department along with a used pickup truck. 

Building permits for 1965 increased 20% over 1964, 
being issued for purposes as follows : Residential 20, Com- 
mercial and Garages 3, Apartment House 1, Renovations 
and Additions 6. 



21 

Two special town meetings were held during the past 
year with appropriations from Surplus Revenue more than 
usual, thereby depleting this account beyond a comfort- 
able balance. We feel it was unfortunate that the article 
dealing with the purchase of a new fire truck was de- 
feated. 

As expected for some time, an ultimatum to abate 
river pollution has been received from the State Depart- 
ment of Public Health. Having voted at the 1965 annual 
town meeting to establish a Sewer Commission, elect- 
ing this body at the 1966 annual town meeting will tend 
to expedite this matter. 

The relocation of Route 9 thru Hatfield is looked to 
with eagerness. It could surpass the anticipated impact 
of Route 91 especially in the expansion of residential con- 
struction. 

We wish to express our thanks to all officers and de- 
partments for their co-operation in the conduct of the 
affairs of the town for the year 1965. 



STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
MICHAEL A. YANGINSKI 
GEORGE W. ROGALEWSKI 

Selectmen of Hatfield 



22 



List of Jurors 

1966 



Blyda, Joseph A., Jr. 
Bye, John W. 
Deane, Michael T. 
Duga, Anna A. 
Fortsch, John J. 
Gore, Eva 
Gore, Raymond 
Hart, Jo vita D. 
Kabat, Helen R. 
Rabat, Joseph 
Kabat, Loretta L. 
Kuzontkoski, Phyllis A. 
Lizek, Ida M. 
Maciorowski, Jessie A. 
Malinowski, Anthony E. 
Osley, Mildred Z. 
Pickunka, Walter A. 
Podmayer, William 
Proulx, Arthur B. 
Riley, Daniel F. 
Rogaleski, Gertrude B. 
Stef ancik, Paul A. 
Strong, Irene A. 
Szych, Irene A. 
Tobacco, Stella H. 
Yagodzinski, Rosalie M. 
Ziezulewicz, Stanley E. 



Farmer 

Factory 

Attendant 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Farmer 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Tobacco Maint Foreman 

Housewife 

Manufacturer 

Truck Driver 

Public Relations 

Retired 

Housewife 

Restauranteur 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Food Handler 



23 



Treasurers Report 

1965 



Peter S. Rogaleski, Treasurer 

In Account with the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts 
Cash on Hand January 1, 1965 $243,200.95 



Receipts for 1965: 




January- 


$ 25,486.76 


February 


23,233.39 


March 


23,690.36 


April 


49,728.80 


May 


18,505.95 


June 


41,603.24 


July 


37,379.44 


August 


55,289.95 


September 


53,297.69 


October 


122,781.38 


November 


103,539.81 


December 


75,013.50 




fi°9 ^0 °7 




XJiuiJ fKJtJXJ %L4 I 




$872,751.22 



24 



Payments per Warrant: 



January $ 20,112.91 

February 45,142.49 

March 87,392.51 

April 39,230.99 

May 41,689.64 

June 54,584.57 

July 55,238.83 

August 39,566.85 

September 62,396.45 

October 54,519.84 

November 53,610.74 

December 137,631.51 



$691,117.33 



Cash on Hand December 31, 1965 181,633.89 



$872,751.22 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Treasurer 



25 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE AND OTHER FUNDS 





Ceme- 


In- 


With 


Bal- 




tery 


come 


drawn 


ance 


Hannah W. Smith 


C $ 


21.29 $ 


12.53 $ 


315.15 


J. D. Brown 


c 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Lewis S. Dyer 


c 


4.08 


4.08 


101.00 


Charles H. Waite 


NH 


5.54 


5.54 


137.49 


Charles M. Billings 


C 


10.10 


10.10 


250.00 


James Porter 


C 


4.40 


4.40 


109.51 


Fannie M. Burke 


C 


4.46 


4.46 


110.82 


Chas. S. Shattuck 


C 


4.44 


4.44 


110.63 


Seth W. Kingsley 


C 


4.40 


4.40 


109.45 


Reuben Belden 


B 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Theo Porter 


C 


4.28 


4.28 


106.18 


Charles L. Graves 


C 


4.28 


4.28 


106.22 


Augusta Beals 


C 


8.36 


8.36 


207.29 


B. M. Warner 


C 


8.36 


8.36 


207.42 


Henry Batcheller 


C 


4.08 


4.08 


101.26 


Reuben H. Belden 


B 


4.08 


4.08 


101.00 


Edwin H. Eldridge 


B 


8.08 


8.08 


200.67 


David Wells 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Otis Wells 


C 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Carrie L. Graves 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Harriet S. Marsh 


C 


8.24 


8.24 


204.35 


Clarence E. Belden 


B 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Alfred J. Bonneville 


C 


6.54 


6.54 


350.00 


Roswell Billings 


C 


10.10 


10.10 


250.00 


Houghton-Douglas 


WH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Susan Zima 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Samuel Osley 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Leon Harris 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Joseph Allen Vining 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Mabel M. Strong 


WH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Paul Vachula 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Edward S. Dickinson 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Luman Crafts 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Oliver Smith 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Robert L. Belden (New) B 


2.50 


2.50 


150.00 


E. S. Warner 


C 


6.07 


6.07 


204.53 


William Dougherty 


C 


1.24 


1.24 


251.56 


Scott & Herman Harris 


B 


1.00 


1.00 


200.00 


Mary E. Hubbard 




4.04 


4.04 


100.00 



26 



Anthony Douglas 




2.22 


2.22 


55.24 


Caleb & Edgar Dickinson 




8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


E. C. Billings C & H 


25.04 


25.04 


620.27 


Hugh McLeod 


C 


4.12 


4.12 


102.92 


Lucius & Stearns Curtis 


C 


10.26 


10.26 


254.28 


H. W. Carl 


C 


4.12 


4.12 


102.73 


J. Franklin Knight 


C 


17.28 


17.28 


428.20 


Silas Hubbard & J. Hastings 


C 


11.28 


11.28 


279.57 


Levi Graves 


C 


6.42 


6.42 


159.00 


Jonathan Graves 


C 


8.24 


8.24 


204.12 


J. E. Porter 


C 


4.12 


4.12 


102.43 


Chester Hastings 


C 


4.16 


4.16 


103.14 


Frary-Gardner 


NH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.57 


Thaddeus & Solomon Graves 


C 


8.12 


8.12 


201.91 


Samuel Field 


B 


6.06 


6.06 


150.53 


Samuel Field 


B 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Alpheus Cowles 


C 


4.32 


4.32 


107.18 


Daniel Allis 


C 


6.14 


6.14 


152.22 


P. M. Wells 


NH 


5.22 


5.22 


129.86 


Benj. Waite 


C 


3.64 


3.64 


90.91 


Joseph D. Billings 


C 


8.16 


8.16 


202.92 


Cooley Dickinson 


NH 


5.22 


5.22 


129.63 


Lemuel B. Field 


C 


4.40 


4.40 


109.18 


Roswell Hubbard 


C 


4.16 


4.16 


103.54 


Abby Dickinson 


C 


412 


4.12 


102.57 


Rufus H. Cowls 


C 


4.48 


4.48 


111.44 


Charles E. Hubbard 


C 


4.60 


4.60 


114.30 


Luman M. Moore 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.64 


Israel & Lucy Morton 


C 


12.96 


12.96 


321.39 


Elijah Bardwell 


C 


16.20 


16.20 


401.90 


Luther Wells 


NH 


13.74 


13.74 


340.48 


Oliver Warner 


C 


2.10 


2.10 


52.37 


John H. Sanderson 


C 


4.24 


4.24 


105.44 


Charles Smith 


C 


4.40 


4.40 


109.05 


J. H. Howard 


C 


4.32 


4.32 


107.48 


Conrad W. Wolfram 


NH 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Henry R. Holden 


NH 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Fannie Allis 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Charles A. Byrne 


C 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


N. T. Abels 


WH 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Arthur C. Bardwell 


C 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Fred Schepp 


C 


3.02 


3.02 


75.00 


Joseph Schepp 


C 


3.02 


3.02 


75.00 



27 



General Care Fund 


Hill 


30.90 


30.90 


765.29 


John H. Sauergapf 


C 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Lorenzo Cutter 


WH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Roswell G. Billings 


C 


10.10 


10.10 


250.00 


Charles Wight 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


General Care Fund 


C 


.40 


.40 


10.00 


Stephen Omasta 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


G. Raymond Billings 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Frederick A. Pease 


C 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Arthur Smith 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Curtis Waite 


WH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Herman Harris 


B 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Harold J. Morse 


C 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


John W. Dan- 


NH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Adam Englehardt 


NH 


10.10 


10.10 


250.00 


Connie Liebl 


WH 


7.06 


7.06 


175.00 


George Marsh 


B 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


R. M. Woods 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Arthur Hodder 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


John Ondras & Geo. Pusek 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


John Osley, Sr. 


WH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Susie Yurik 


WH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


John Bucala 


WH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


George Strong 


WH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Lilla Carl Ryan 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


H. W. Dickinson 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Martin Zapka 


WH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Yura Fusek 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


C. Mabel Barton 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


John Podmayer 


WH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


John Zapka 


WH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


John A. Billings 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Reuben F. Wells 


C 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Paul Holich 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Geo. C. & Geo. N. Pfeiffer 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Arthur B. Harris 


B 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Martin Bucala 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Malcolm Crawford 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Harry E. Kingsley 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Moses & Lewis H. Kingsley 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Edith Wight Kuzmeski 


B 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Paul Duga 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Raymond Donelson 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 



28 



Joseph A. Darr 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


George S. Belden 


B 


5.04 


5.04 


150.00 


Luther A. Belden 


B 


5.04 


5.04 


150.00 


Leland H. Wight 


B 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Stephen Vachula 


NH 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Lester Clark 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 




$ 836.44 $ 


827.68 $ 21,292.23 


Hannah W. Smith 










(Custody State Treasurer] 


I 






300.00 


Firemen's Relief Fund 




4.24 




109.34 


Stabilization Fund 




2,064.90 




63,275.31 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Treasurer 



29 



Assessors' Report 



Value of Assessed Real Estate $ 14,186,730.00 

Value of Assessed Personal Property 1,017,450.00 



Total Value Personal & Real $ 15,204.180.00 

Number of Dwellings 749 

Number of Acres 9,060 

Town Appropriations $540,157.74 

State Audit 1,323.10 

State Parks & Reservations 1,886.96 

County Tax 30,032.20 

County Hospital Assessment 7,752.76 

Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 282.60 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Income Tax $ 38,407.04 

Corporation Tax 23,135.58 

Excise Tax 52,000.00 

Licenses 6,000.00 

Schools 9,900.00 

Old Age Tax 992.00 

Old Age Assistance 6,000.00 

Veterans' Service 2,000.00 

Interest on Taxes 2,800.00 

State Assistance School Construction 6,650.00 

All Other Estimated Receipts 1,450.00 

Total of Estimated Receipts $149,264.85 

Total County & State Assessments $ 41,277.62 



30 

PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Church Property $304,850.00 

Town Property 955,050.00 

Smith Academy 63,000.00 

Cemeteries 103,000.00 

American Legion 17,000.00 

D.P.W. Office 475,000.00 

Water Supply System 90,000.00 

Schools 798,000.00 

Highway Department 150,000.00 



MITCHELL W. KEMPISTY, Chm. 
RICHARD BELDEN 
JOSEPH WILKES 

Board of Assessors 



31 



Town Clerk's Report 





VITAL STATISTICS 








1965 








Births Marriages 


Deaths 


Male 


24 32 




18 


Female 


19 




13 


Total 


43 32 
Preceding Five Years 




31 


1964 


43 29 




29 


1963 


43 20 




31 


1962 


35 17 




27 


1961 


57 16 




26 


1960 


42 25 
LICENSES 




21 




Dog 


Fish & Game 


1965 


208 




416 


1964 


192 




414 


1963 


190 




379 


1962 


157 




334 


1961 


153 
ELECTIONS 




356 


Registered Voters December 31, 1965 




1,423 


Voted at Annual Town Meeting, Feb. 15, 


1965 


756 


Special Town M 


[eetings in 1965 




2 



32 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

October 8, 1965 

ARTICLES AND VOTES UNDER SAME 



Article 1. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from Surplus Revenue the sum of $2,000.00 to the Public 
Welfare Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 1. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $2,000.00 to the Public Welfare Account. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from Surplus Revenue the sum of $5,000.00 to the Dis- 
ability Assistance Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 2. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $5,000.00 to the Disability Assistance Ac- 
count. 

Article 3. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from Surplus Revenue the sum of $1,600.00 to the Vet- 
erans' Benefits Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 3. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $1,600.00 to the Veterans' Benefits Ac- 
count. 



33 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from Surplus Revenue the sum of $250.00 to the Library- 
Basement Room Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 4. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $250.00 to the Library Basement Room 
Account. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from Surplus Revenue the sum of $275.00 in addition to 
the State's share appropriated under Article 9 at the An- 
nual Town Meeting held on February 15, 1965 under the 
provisions of Chapter 81, General Laws and return said 
amount to Surplus Revenue when reimbursement is re- 
ceived, or act anything thereon. 

Article 5. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $275.00 in addition to the State's share ap- 
propriated under Article 9 at the Annual Town meeting 
held in February 15, 1965 under the provisions of Chap- 
ter 81, General Laws and return said amount to Surplus 
Revenue when reimbursement is received. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Moderator to appoint a committee of five members, 
said committee, with the Board of Selectmen, to investi- 
gate the purchase of a new fire truck, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 6. Voted to authorize the Moderator to ap- 
point a committee of five members, said committee, with 
the Board of Selectmen, to investigate the purchase of a 
new fire truck. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from Surplus Revenue the sum of $14,000.00 for the pur- 
chase of a new fire truck, or act anything thereon. 



34 

Article 7. Voted to lay on table. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from Surplus Revenue the sum of $500.00 to the Police 
Department, or act anything thereon. 

Article 8. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $500.00 to the Police Department. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to hear and 
discuss the report of the School Building Committee on 
the question of the feasability of the contruction of an 
addition to Smith Academy, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Article 9. School Building Committee reported that 
it would be unwise to add to Smith Academy. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to empower 
the School Building Committee to select an architect to 
draft preliminary plans for the construction of additional 
school rooms to Smith Academy or an addition to or near 
Smith Academy to be used as additional classrooms and 
to present these plans for approval of the townspeople at 
a town meeting at the first practical moment and further 
to see if the town will vote to appropriate the sum of 
$8,000.00 from Surplus Revenue for use by said School 
Building Committee for said purpose, or take any action 
in relation thereto. 

Article 10. Voted not to proceed with plans for an 
addition to Smith Academy or the construction of an addi- 
tional classroom facility near Smith Academy and voted 
not to appropriate any monies under this article. 

Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



35 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
December 28, 1965 

ARTICLES AND VOTES UNDER SAME 



Article 1. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $178.09 from the Aid to Dependent Children 
Account to the Disability Assistance Account, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Article 1. Voted to transfer the sum of $178.09 
from the Aid to Dependent Children Account to the Dis- 
ability Assistance Account. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $607.18 from the Medical Assistance to the 
Aged Account to the Disability Assistance Account, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Article 2. Voted to transfer the sum of $67.18 from 
the Medical Assistance to the Aged Account to the Dis- 
ability Account. 

Article 3. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $1,116.64 from the Old Age Assistance Ac- 
count to the Disability Assistance Account, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Article 3. Voted to transfer the sum of $1,116.64 
from the Old Age Assistance Account to the Disability 
Assistance Account. 



36 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $6,724.38 from the Surplus Revenue Account 
to the Disability Assistance Account, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Article 4. Voted to appropriate the sum of $6,724.38 
from the Surplus Revenue Account to the Disability As- 
sistance Account. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $15,000.00 from the Surplus Revenue Account 
to the Stabilization Fund, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Article 5. Voted to appropriate the sum of $15,000.00 
from the Surplus Revenue Account to the Stabilization 
Fund. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to empower 
the Fire Truck Committee, appointed by the Moderator in 
accordance with the vote under Article 6 of the Town 
Warrant of the Special Town Meeting held on October 8, 
1965, together with the Board of Selectmen to purchase 
a new fire truck for the town and to appropriate the sum 
of $16,000.00 from Surplus Revenue for said purchase of 
a new fire truck or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 6. Voted not to authorize the purchase of 
a new fire truck and voted not to appropriate any money. 



Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



37 



Visiting Nurse Association 



Total number of visits made 406 

Fees collected $288.00 

Visits to welfare recipients — 

no reimbursement received 102 

Miles travelled 1,433 

Classification of visits : 

Medical 323 

Child Welfare 48 

Communicable Disease 20 

Tuberculosis Contacts 15 

Well Child Clinic, May 11 & 13 78 children 

Upon recommendation of the State Department of 
Public Health, three clinics were held in the spring to ad- 
minister injections for Diphtheria and Tetanus to adults 
and children and to complete all pre-school children in 
need of the Sabin Oral Vaccine. The results are as fol- 
lows: 

Adults receiving booster dose 40 

Adults completing series 29 

Adults receiving 2 injections 14 

Adults receiving 1 injection 96 

Pre-school children receiving booster dose 2 

Pre-school children receiving 2 injections 2 

Pre-school children receiving Sabin series 13 
Clinics under supervision of Dr. Byrne and Dr. Kaiser 



38 

At the request of and in co-operation with the Dis- 
trict Department of Public Health, several visits were 
made to the homes of newborn infants, to obtain informa- 
tion in regard to the mother's plans for baby's health su- 
pervision and immunizations. 

In July, your nurse accompanied Public Health offi- 
cials of the District Health Office on a tour of the three 
camps in town housing migrant workers to investigate 
the sanitation facilities at the quarters. 

LUCILLE GODEK, R.N. 



Local nurses who assisted at clinics : 

Mrs. Dorothy Boyle 
Mrs. Dorothy Sheehan 
Mrs. Edna Beattie 
Mrs. Rita Prew 
Mrs. Jovita Hart 
Mrs. Lillian Morin 
Mrs. Mildred Osley 
Mrs. Ethel Byrne 
Mrs. Ethel Podmayer 

We wish to express our appreciation to Dr. Byrne, 
Dr. Kaiser, and the above townspeople, who assisted at 
the various clinics. 

ETHEL PODMAYER 



39 

HATFIELD VISITING NURSE 
EXPENSES AND RECEIPTS FOR 1965 

Balance as of January 1, 1965 $ 78.93 

Receipts : 



From Visiting Nurse 
From Town of Hatfield 


288.00 
2,400.00 




Total Receipts for 1965 

Expenses : 

Nurse's Salary 
Mileage 
Social Security 
Clerk 


$2,200.00 

128.97 

75.00 

25.00 


2,766.93 


Total Expenses for 1965 


$ 


2,428.97 



Balance as of January 1, 1966 $ 337.96 



40 



Report of the Fire Department 



To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

I wish to submit my second annual report of the Fire 
Department. I wish to thank all members of the Fire 
Department and those who helped in fighting the fires in 
the past year. I also want to thank the citizens of Hat- 
field for their wonderful co-operation in keeping the num- 
ber of fires down during the dry spells. 

The Fire Department has purchased a smoke ejector 
and a hose rolling table. 

On July 24, the American La France fire truck had 
thrown a connecting rod bearing and has been out of 
service ever since. 

During the past year the fire trucks were called out 
47 times which are as follows: 



Child locked in room 


1 


Dump 


9 


Grass fires 


17 


Woods 


2 


Caskets on Rte. 91 


1 


Resuscitator call 


1 


Fires along R.R. tracks 


9 


House (with case of 1 death) 


1 



41 



Mutual Aid assistance 


1 


Cheese cloth 


1 


Car fire 


1 


Truck fire 


1 



There were 108 outdoor burning permits issued and 
15 Oil Burner permits issued. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MYRON J. SIKORSKI 

Fire Chief 



42 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Citizens of Hatfield 

During the past year power line trimming was done 
throughout town by the Utility Companies. Other trim- 
ming and pruning was done by the Town Tree Dept., in 
the most hazardous areas of Main St., School St., Maple 
St., North St., Chestnut St., North Hatfield Rd., Prospect 
St., Dwight St., Elm St., and Bradstreet Depot Rd. 

Thirty-two young maple trees were planted and fer- 
tilized, as replacements and in new sites. 

All roadside trees were sprayed with D.D.T. and 
Methoxychlor. 

Five stumps, considered dangerous, were removed, 
four on School St. at Kiley Corner, and one on Prospect 
St. at Skorupski residence. 

Seven trees infected with Dutch Elm disease were 
taken down and burned. 

Fifty-four other trees were taken down; hazardous, 
wood decay or new road construction, and wind damage. 

Some assistance was given on some of these trees by 
the Utility Companies, where power lines were involved. 

Tree Removals were as follows: 

Main St., 9 Elms, 2 Maples, 1 Birch 
Bridge St., 5 Elms, 2 Maples 



43 



Prospect St., 2 Elms, 1 Maple 

North Hatfield Rd., 1 Maple 

Elm St., 3 Maples 

Bradstreet, Depot Rd., 1 Elm, 2 Maples 

Cronin Hill Rd., 1 Maple 

Old Farms Rd., 1 Maple 

Maple St., 1 Maple 

Gore Ave., 1 Elm, 1 Walnut 

Plain Rd., 3 Elms, 1 Poplar 

School St., 4 Elms 

Mountain Rd., 1 Elm 

Chestnut St., 2 Elms, 1 Maple 

Removed by Highway Dept., for new road construc- 
tion: 

Chestnut St., 5 Pine trees and 2 Apple Trees on 

Wilkes Corner 
King St., 1 Elm, 5 Maples 

Removed by School Dept.: 

2 Poplar trees, rear of Center School 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCIS E, GODIN 

Tree Warden 



44 



Library Report 



To the Trustees of the Public Library 
and to the Citizens of Hatfield : 

I herewith submit my sixth annual report as Libra- 
rian of Hatfield. 

During the year 624 books were added to the library. 
Of these 255 were for children and 369 were for adults. 
A number of these were gifts from townspeople for which 
we are very grateful. The Library can always use a good 
book. 

A total of 36,802 books and periodicals were circu- 
lated during the year. 

The circulation was as follows: 

Juvenile fiction 16,609 

Juvenile non-fiction 6,280 

Adult fiction 8,603 

Adult non-fiction 5,310 

We borrowed 2,315 books from the bookmobile and 
also 205 books from Interlibrary Loan. Again we remind 
the townspeople that we can borrow any book we do not 
have whether it is fiction or non-fiction. 



45 

This year we had a scuba diving reading club for the 
children which was sponsored by the Hatfield Book Club. 
We are very grateful to them for helping to make it pos- 
sible to keep up the children's interest in reading during 
the summer months. 

Our story hours which we have every two weeks dur- 
ing the summer months are most successful. Each year 
we have a larger number of children attending these story 
hours. I wish to thank our most proficient story-tellers, 
Mrs. Marianna Rowe of the Regional Library Staff, Mrs. 
Rita Prew, and Mrs. Anne Tierney of the Hatfield teach- 
ing staff, for the time they spent in making the library a 
place of enjoyment and educational interest for the chil- 
dren. 

During National Library Week, with the co-opera- 
tion of the teachers, we had a poster and essay contest. 
Prizes were given to the student who had the best poster 
and the best essay in each grade. 

This year we had the Women's Endeavor and the 
Hatfield Book Club at our library for an evening meeting. 
Miss Baker, bookmobile librarian, showed slides and told 
of her experiences as bookmobile librarian. 

The Connecticut Valley Library Club held their 
spring meeting at the library with Robert McClung, au- 
thor and illustrator of nature stories for children, as 
speaker. 

We now have a reading and study room in the base- 
ment for older students. This was made possible by the 
hard work and time given by our trustees, Mrs. Dorothy 
Breor, Miss Margaret Wentzel, and Mr. Michael Majesky. 
It required a lot of planning on the part of the trustees to 



46 

complete this room with the money allotted for it. Before 
the room could be started the building inspector had 
them enclose the boiler room by building a fire wall and 
installing fire doors. A vent had to be installed in the 
room for air for the boiler. 

The walls of the room were plastered, bookcases were 
installed, tile was laid on the floor, a heating unit, and 
lights were installed. The bookcases were then varnished 
and the cellar stairs and wall near the stairs were painted. 

Use of this room is to be a privilege, open only to the 
young people who can be trusted to study quietly and 
make proper use of the library books and furniture. If 
this room is used enough to warrant another night of 
opening, we will do so. 

Our library is open Monday and Friday from 11:30 
A.M. to 2 :00 P.M. and from 6 :45 P.M. to 9 :00 P.M. and on 
Wednesday from 11:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 

To Mrs. Helen Osley, Mrs. Doris M. Vollinger, the 
Trustees, and the teachers, I wish to express my sincere 
appreciation for their co-operation and assistance during 
the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. CANTWELL 

Librarian 



47 



Police Report 

1965 



I respectfully submit the report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1965. Also the 
number of arrests in the Town of Hatfield. 

Operating under the influence 1 

Minor carrying liquor in car 2 

Altering driving license 2 

False I.D. to procure liquor 6 

Drunkenness 4 

Parking on sidewalk 2 

No registration in possession 1 

No license in possession 1 

Motor Vehicle equipment tags 4 

Operation without license 2 

Operating without registration 2 

Operating without insurance 2 

Attaching plates 2 

Leaving scene of accident 2 

Speeding 16 

Allowing improper person to operate 1 

Delinquent child 1 

Operating after license suspension 1 

Registry action 16 



48 

Institutions 3 

Accidents investigated 19 

Warrants served 1 

Summons served 58 
All committed dog taxes collected 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY SLIWOSKI 

Chief of Police 



49 



Report of Water Commissioners 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

The year of 1965 was the driest of any remembered 
by the Water Board. If it were not for the new under- 
ground supply installed this spring we would have been 
in serious trouble. 

In the early part of the year, all properties necessary 
for our underground water supply were deeded to the 
Department and bids were let for the construction of a 
pump house and all necessary equipment for the pumping 
of water at our location in West Hatfield. The pump was 
turned on June 9, 1965 and was in constant operation till 
September 10, 1965. It was pumping around the clock 
with an average output of 300,000 gallons daily. In July 
the pump was shut down for two days to allow for paint- 
ing of pipes, floors and all other items which required a 
coat of paint. 

It has been heard around town that the Water De- 
partment had to shut down for lack of water at the well 
site. This is not true. The pump is designed to pump at 
a rated capacity of 200 gals, per minute and never has 
dropped below this rate at any time, as the chart at the 
station will show. By adjusting the fins on the pump it 
will pump as much as 225 to 230 gals, per minute. 



50 

There are many people in this town that think this 
pumping station was put in for irrigation purposes. It was 
not. It was put in for domestic use. We all like our lawns 
and shrubs to look nice and green, but when a water 
shortage exists and a water ban is in effect, the Dept. ex- 
pects the citizens to abide with the rules on a 24-hour 
basis. If each and every one of us used our water in a 
sensible manner, we believe we would have enough water, 
even for sprinkling purposes. There are those people in 
town who put their sprinklers on and leave them on day 
and night, sometimes for hours in one location. Some use 
two or three units. This is ridiculous. How much water do 
we need for people who are doing this ? If this continues, 
the only solution to the water problem will be to have 
metered water, which would be expensive. 

Statistics show that towns and cities which have in- 
stalled meters are using up to 40% less water. This is the 
only way to stabilize the water rent situation, and also 
conserve water. 

The Board attended a Water Research Development 
Meeting in West Springfield last summer to get informa- 
tion on the water situation here in the Northeast, and on 
how to obtain monies if available for future water proj- 
ects from the government. Monies are available at no in- 
terest charge, we were told, but would have to be repaid. 
The staff of Army, Federal and State Engineers who were 
present at the gathering to discuss the various problems 
of the towns and cities, who were represented by their 
boards, told us that they had made a five-year survey of 
the water problems in the Northeast. They told us that 
within 10 years we would be pumping water out of the 
Connecticut River if the water table continues to drop at 
the alarming pace of the last five years. They also urged 
the towns and cities to pool their water supplies wherever 



51 



possible, so as to cut the cost of obtaining water to a mini- 
mum. Water is expensive to procure, so let's all try to 
conserve it. 

In closing, the Board wishes to thank Miss E. Porada, 
the town attorney, for her endless hours she has spent 
with the Board in the past year. She has been of great 
help to us on the legal end of our business. 



Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH VOLLINGER, Chm. 
RUPERT HARUBIN 
JOHN RUDY 

Water Commissioners 



52 

Report of Gas Inspector 



To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

The law requires that a written permit in a form and 
manner prescribed by the local gas inspector shall be ob- 
tained by persons performing gas fitting work as defined 
in Chapter 623 of the Acts of 1962 before commencing 
each installation. The violation of this act may result in 
some inconvenience to the consumer. 

Permits were issued for the following appliances and 
gas piping: 

17 Domestic Ranges 
10 Water Heaters 
5 Hot Air Furnaces 

4 Heating Boilers 
2 Unit Heaters 

2 Clothes Dryers 

2 Commercial Cookers 

1 Window Heater 

1 Grill 

1 Commercial Dishwasher 

5 Permits were issued for Liquified Petroleum 

installations. 
232 Permits were issued applying to agriculture 
tobacco curers. 

All unsatisfactory installations were corrected. I 
would like to thank the local tobacco industry for their 
co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HAROLD B. LIZEK 

Gas Inspector 



53 

School Building Committee Report 



Under Article 14, at the last annual Town meeting 
the town voted to empower the School Building Commit- 
tee to have such expert assistance as is necessary to en- 
able such committee to determine the feasability of con- 
structing an addition to Smith Academy to meet the need 
for additional classroom space. 

The Building Committee held ten meetings and a con- 
ference with the Massachusetts School Building Assist- 
ance Commission in Boston during the past year. 

The Building Committee held several joint meetings 
with the Smith Academy Board of Trustees and the 
Board of Selectmen regarding modernization of the pres- 
ent Smith Academy and a proposed addition. 

With the cooperation of the Smith Academy Trus- 
tess, the Board of Selectmen and professional advice it 
was found that a two-story, (12) twelve-room addition 
was possible; cost estimate and sketch were prepared. 

The estimated cost would be about $400,000.00 with- 
out equipment. The total cost would have to be borne by 
the town, as the Massachusetts Building Assistance Com- 
mission did not approve of this type of solution. 

At the Oct. 8, 1965 Special Town Meeting under Ar- 
ticle 10, regarding the proposed addition, the vote was 
negative. The consensus of opinion at this meeting was 
that the Building Committee investigate a complete new 
structure qualifying for State Aid. 



54 

The School Building Committee has submitted and 
requested the inclusion of an article pertaining to school 
building, but due to circumstances beyond its control, the 
article was omitted from the Warrant of the Special Town 
Meeting of Dec. 28, 1965. 

It is the Building Committee's desire that the Board 
of Selectmen will see fit to place the submitted article to 
resolve the school building problem in the Warrant of the 
Annual Town Meeting. 

It is to the best educational and physical welfare 
of the youth and townspeople that your committee is 
dedicated. 

The committee wishes to express its appreciation 
to the Smith Academy Board of Trustees, various town 
and State officials and townspeople for their participation 
and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THADDEUS RABAT, Chm. 
JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI, Sec. 
RICHARD D. BELDEN 
MRS. ETHEL BYRNE 
WILLIAM H. BURKE 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
WILLIAM S. OLSZEWSKI 
JOSEPH V. PORADA, JR. 
EUGENE F. PROULX 
RAYMOND RUSSELL 
STANLEY SLIWOSKI 

Hatfield School Building Committee 



55 



Hatfield Youth League 



The two activities of the Hatfield Youth League, 
namely basketball and baseball, run for a period of nine 
months each year. 

When the call in April was held for registration and 
practice in baseball, approximately 75 reported and signed 
up to play. The varsity team was first selected after a 
number of screening practices and was the team that 
represented Hatfield in the Frontier Youth League. Fol- 
lowing this selection four other teams were organized and 
played intramural games for two rounds or six weeks. 

The Hatfield varsity team participates with five other 
towns in the Frontier Youth League, namely Conway, Old 
Deerfield, South Deerfield, Sunderland and Whately. The 
team again brought honor to Hatfield when it won the sec- 
ond half of the league and in the playoff games with first 
half winner South Deerfield, took the championship of the 
league for Hatfield in two straight wins. Ever since the 
Hatfield team was entered in the league in 1960, it has 
been under the capable coaching of James Mullins, Sr. and 
for the past three seasons has been assisted by Kenneth 
Balise. The six-year record of the team stands at three 
championships, twice as runner-up, and once in fourth 
place. All players from the five local teams were again 
treated by a trip to a Springfield Giants game and the 
champions to a Boston Red Sox game. 



56 



Immediately following the 1965 baseball season, it 
was foreseen that a need for new uniforms for the varsity 
team was at hand. A successful fund-raising project was 
held and the uniforms are now on order for the coming 
season. 

When basketball registration was called, approxi- 
mately 65 youths turned out. These players were divided 
into two groups, namely Grades 3 through 5 and Grades 6 
through 8. There are eight teams altogether with each 
team scheduled for one game a week. 

We wish to again repeat that in order for these activi- 
ties to be continued successfully, coaches and helpers in 
both sports are always needed. 

We again wish to express our deep gratitude to all 
groups and individuals for their help and support in the 
past and look forward to their continued help and support 
in the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY P. BETSOLD, Pres. 
FRANK J. GODEK, Vice Pres. 
THOMAS P. MULLINS, Sec. 
WILLIAM S. OLSZEWSKI, Treas. 



57 



Report of 
Community Action Committee 



By authority of the Economic Opportunity Act of 
1964, the Hatfield Board of Selectmen appointed the fol- 
lowing residents to represent the town as a "Community 
Action Committee": Arthur B. Proulx, Dorothy Breor, 
John Skarzinski and Francis Hebert. By vote of the com- 
mittee Arthur B. Proulx was elected chairman. 

The Hatfield Community Action Committee is part 
of "The Hampshire Community Action Committee, Inc." 
with headquarters in the city of Northampton, Mass. 

The purpose of your local Action Committee is to co- 
ordinate programs and make recommendations concern- 
ing the activities of agencies responsible for education, 
social services, youth employment, and related programs 
so that Hatfield can more effectively and efficiently satis- 
fy the educational, economic and social needs of its people. 

In the words of President Johnson: "The central 
problem is to protect and restore man's satisfaction in 
belonging to a community where he can find security and 
significance," and it is to these principles that we dedicate 
our service. 



Signed : 



ARTHUR B. PROULX 
DOROTHY BREOR 
JOHN SKARZYNSKI 
FRANCIS HEBERT 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, J 965 



61 



Report of Town Accountant 





RECEIPTS 






GENERAL REVENUE 




Taxes : 
Personal 1965 
Real 1965 
Trailer 1965 
Poll Previous Years 
Personal Previous Years 
Real Previous Years 




$ 16,132.20 

242,329.30 

444.00 

8.00 

1,152.01 

44,891.37 

<tOI\A ARC OO 




$. 


JUt,i"JU.UO 


Motor Vehicle Excise: 
Levy of 1965 
Previous Years 




$ 49,099.09 
8,920.28 


58,019.37 
387.50 


Farm Animal Excise 




Commonwealth of Massach 
Income Tax 
Corporation Tax 
Chapter 70, G. L. 
Meal Tax 
State & County Taxes 


usetts: 


$ 6,095.00 

20,524.12 

33,943.00 

922.23 

980.50 


62,464.85 






Licenses and Permits: 
Liquor 
Milk 
All Other 




$ 5,800.00 

4.00 

334.50 


6,138.50 
594.50 


Court Fines 





62 

RECEIPTS 

Grants from Federal Government: 

Old Age Assistance $ 5,551.88 

Aid to Dependent Children 3,429.93 

Disability Assistance 302.12 

Medical Assistance for Aged 6,333.81 

School Lunch — Fed. 8,751.71 

Schools — Public Law #864 3,143.98 

Schools — Public Law #874 6,726.00 



34,239.43 



Grants from Commonwealth: 

Vocational Education $ 4,322.09 

Transportation of Pupils 7,581.60 

Free Public Library 587.50 

Highway Chap. 81 16,906.33 



29,397.52 



Grants from Hampshire County: 

Dog Licenses 68.82 



Total General Government 


$496,267.37 


COMMERCIAL GOVERNMENT 




Board of Appeals 


$ 


100.00 


Outlays 




73.20 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 




55.10 


Slaughter Inspection Fees 




21.50 


Police 




58.00 


Fire 




116.75 


Sewer Connections 




300.00 


Dog Disposal 




51.00 


Highways : 






Chapter 90 Maint. — State 


$ 1,000.00 




Chapter 90 Maint. — County 


1,000.00 




Machinery Fund 


5,684.41 




Chapter 90 Construction — State 


9,500.00 




Chapter 90 Construction — County 


4.750.00 




Individual — Damages 


191.52 

< 


>9 1 9K Q« 



63 



RECEIPTS 



Public Welfare: 
Welfare — State 

Aid to Dependent Children — State 
Old Age Assistance — State 
Old Age Assistance — Individual — 

Recovery 
Medical Assistance for Aged — State 

Veterans' Benefits 



50.19 

142.89 

1,093.46 

3,763.61 
3,471.99 



8,522.14 
274.50 



Schools : 

Athletic Receipts 
School Lunch Collections 
Tuition 

Library Fines 



$ 1,731.69 

23,163.75 

1,130.60 



26,026.04 
84.82 



Water Department: 
Water Rates 
Water Com. and Misc. 

School Construction — Chap. 645 Acts '48 
Compensation — State Withholding Tax 
Insurance Dividends Chap. 32 B 
Right of Way Use — Elm Street Lot 
Care of Cemetery Lots 



$ 22,115.90 
1,229.10 



23,345.00 

6,654.55 

33.46 

327.41 

332.40 

348.25 



General Interest : 
Interest on Taxes 
Interest on Motor Vehicle Excise 
Charges and Fees 

Interest on Trust Funds 



$ 2,915.50 

304.59 

7.50 



3,227.59 
836.44 



Total Commercial Revenue $ 92,914.08 

AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

Dog Licenses Due County $ 423.50 

Cemetery Perpetual Care — New Funds 400.00 

Withholding Tax — Federal 27,093.70 



64 
RECEIPTS 



Retirement 


3,870.24 


State Withholding 


3,146.17 


Blue Cross 


4,933.44 


Teachers' Health and Accident 


498.36 




dO 365 41 






Refunds 


3.41 


Cash on Hand January 1, 1965 


243,200.95 



TOTAL $872,751.22 



65 
PAYMENTS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Moderator $ 25.00 

Selectmen: 

Salaries 1,500.00 

Clerk 300.00 

Expenses: 

Printing, Postage, Stationery $ 77.65 

Dues 59.00 

All Other 12.50 

149.15 



2,675.00 



Accountant: 
Salary 




Expenses: 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


169.77 


Dues 


5.00 


Treasurer : 




Salary 




Expenses : 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


139.57 


Bond 


162.00 


Clerical 


240.00 


Travel 


125.60 


Dues 


4.00 



174.77 



2,975.00 



671.17 
Purchase Adding Machine — 

Treasurer's Office 212.00 

Collector of Taxes: 

Salary 2,000.00 
Expenses: 

Clerical $ 380.00 

Printing, Postage, Stationery 328.75 

Surety Bond 326.00 

Travel 120.00 

Dues 4.00 

1,158.75 



66 



PAYMENTS 






Assessors : 






Salary 




2,600.00 


Expenses : 






Clerical 


$ 40.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


299.76 




Travel 


112.40 




Dues 


12.00 




All Other 


78.00 


542.16 
10.00 


Elector under Oliver Smith Will 




Attorney's Fees 




1,000.00 


Town Clerk: 






Salary 




2,875.00 


Expenses : 






Recording Fees 


$ 115.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


109.85 




Surety Bond 


10.00 




Dues 


10.00 




Travel 


115.20 




Clerical 


180.00 


540.05 


Election and Registrations: 




Registrars 


$ 99.00 




Election Officers 


146.00 




Clerical 


230.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


373.55 




Street Lists 


614.50 


1,463.05 


, 




Appeals Board Expense 




145.89 


Finance Committee Expense 




38.30 


Town Hall : 






Janitor 


$ 3,250.00 




Fuel 


1,517.17 




Lights 


1,102.43 




Janitor's Supplies 


335.79 




Repairs 


609.78 




Special Hall License 


25.00 


6,840.17 







Total General Government $ 27,895.46 



67 
PAYMENTS 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Police Department: 






Chief — Salary 


$ 3,000.00 




Chief — Gas & Tire Allow. 


350.00 




Men 


897.35 




Misc. Equipment 


255.56 




Insurance 


313.60 




All Other 


73.40 






t 


4^89.91 




V 


Fire Department: 






Chief 


$ 400.00 




Men 


432.00 




Clerk 


100.00 




Misc. Equipment & Supplies 


848.27 




Oil, Grease, Gas 


67.32 




Truck Repairs 


287.02 




Fuel and Lights 


338.14 




Rent 


360.00 




Dues 


10.00 




Stationery, Printing, Postage 


30.48 




Telephone 


311.08 




All Other 


20.00 


3,204.31 






Sealer of Weights and Measures: 






Salary 


$ 200.00 




Expense 


98.00 


298.00 


Gas Inspector: 




Salary 


200.00 




Expense 


19.00 


219.00 
2,200.00 


Moth Work 




Tree Work 




2,600.00 


Civil Defense 


$ 


290.99 


Total Protection of Persons and Property 


13,702.21 



68 



PAYMENTS 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Public Health 


$ 


22.88 


Visiting Nurse 




2,400.00 


Well-Child Clinic 




160.00 


Inspection Children — Tuberculosis 




66.00 


Inspection of Animals & Slaughter 




275.00 


Total Health and Sanitation 


$ 


2,923.88 


HIGHWAYS 






Highway General: 






Wages 


$ 1,122.30 




Telephone 


180.30 




Fuel 


156.94 




Lights 


61.61 




Rent Dump 


350.00 




Misc. Equipment & Supplies 


358.06 




Sewer Work — Salaries 


1,802.40 




Sewer Work — Supplies 


623.96 






$ 


4,655.57 


Snow and Ice Removal: 






Labor 


$ 3,502.20 




Sidewalks 


342.00 


3,844.20 






Total Highway General 


$ 


8,499.77 


North Street Sidewalk 




998.65 


Dike Repairs 




189.20 


Fence Repairs 




123.60 


Street Lights 




5,546.19 


Bridge Repairs 




1,664.91 


Purchase Front End Loader 




10,777.00 


Highway Chap. 81: 






Labor 


$ 12,251.20 




Town Machinery 


3,914.16 




Gravel & Patch 


1,680.48 




Asphalt 


3,033.54 




Salt & Sand 


945.62 


9.1 R9.?;nn 



69 





PAYMENTS 








Highway Chap. 90 Maintenance: 










Labor 






$ 


692.40 




Machinery 








21.74 




Bituminous Concrete 








2,000.00 




Paint 








285.86 


3,000.00 








Highway Chap. 90 New Const. — 


King St: 








Labor 






$ 


2,887.20 




Town Machinery 








413.80 




Other Machinery 








80.00 




Bituminous Concrete 








1,338.43 




Tree Removal 








240.00 




All Other 








140.00 


5,099.48 








Highway Chap. 90 New Const. — 










School & Chestnut Sts.: 












Labor 






$ 


5,824.80 




Town Machinery 








1,202.71 




Other Machinery 








2,198.00 




Pipe 








2,131.04 




Gravel 








1,516.40 




Bituminous Concrete 








4,194.00 




Catch Basins 








526.00 




Loam 








766.50 




Misc. 








640.55 


19,000.00 








Machinery Operating: 












Parts & Repairs 






$ 


2,184.92 




Gas, Oil Grease 








1,815.08 


4,000.00 






$ 


Total Highways 


80,723.75 



CHARITIES AND VETERANS' BENEFITS 

Public Welfare: 

Salary — Welfare Agent $ 3,390.00 

General Relief: 

Printing, Postage, Stationery $ 85.95 

Travel 102.16 





70 






PAYMENTS 




Groceries 




673.36 


Fuel 




182.80 


Medicine 




423.19 


Hospital 




1,436.80 


Cash Aid 




96.00 



3,000.26 

Aid to Dependent Children: 

Cash Aid 3,018.02 

Disability Assistance: 

Cash Aid 14,358.79 

Medical Assistance for Aged: 

Cash Aid 12,741.02 

Old Age Assistance: 

Cash Aid 7,225.42 



Total Charities 


$ 43,733.51 


Veterans' Benefits: 




Salary Agent 


$ 400.00 


Aid 


3,453.00 


Medical 


35.90 


Food & Rent 


150.00 


All Other 


133.27 




1 1 7" 1 7 







Total Charities and Veterans' Benefits $ 47,905.68 

SCHOOLS 

General Administration: 

Superintendent's Salary $ 3,800.00 

Clerk 1,991.56 

Printing, Postage, Stationery 403.26 

Telephone 558.76 

Travel 563.86 

Census 80.00 

Dues 205.00 

All Other 78.84 

7,681.28 



71 

PAYMENTS 

Teachers* Salaries: 

High Principal $ 6,373.20 

High Salaries 41,991.08 

Junior High 43,192.40 

Elementary Principal 8,540.00 

Elementary 67,983.30 

Music 2,737.17 

Penmanship 500.00 

Handicapped Children 93.43 



171,410.58 



Text and Reference Books: 

High $ 1,517.73 

Elementary 1,129.56 

Junior High 643.59 



Supplies: 

High $ 1,939.53 

Elementary 2,340.38 

Junior High 889.70 

Physical Education 2,544.47 

Driver Education 279.19 

Audio-Visual 76.62 



Transportation : 

High $ 3,282.38 

Elementary 7,530.50 

Athletic 919.61 



Janitor Services: 

High $ 3,800.00 

Junior High 4,200.00 

Elementary 4,800.00 

Fuel and Light: 

High $ 1,588.41 

Junior High 1,037.05 

Elementary 4,982.12 



3,290.88 



6,069.89 



11,732.49 



12,800.00 



7,607.58 



72 
PAYMENTS 

Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds: 

High Janitor's Supplies $ 663.98 

Junior High Janitor's Supplies 1,017.23 

Elementary Janitor's Supplies 1,909.60 

Junior High Repairs 2,035.13 

High Repairs 1,965.75 



7,591.69 



New Equipment 1,077.71 

Equipment Repairs 166.69 

Graduation 225.78 

Nurse 2,503.05 

Nurse's Travel Expenses 26.12 

Health Supplies 54.75 

Insurance 492.80 

School Vehicles — Repairs 1,216.04 

School Vehicles — Gas & Oil 131.22 



Total Paid from Appropriation $236,078.55 

School Committee Expense 245.02 

P. L. #864 1,911.24 

P. L. #874 2,721.40 

Athletic Fund 1,868.12 

School Physicians 550.00 

School Building Committee Expense 1,771.77 

Vocational School Tuition 6,363.63 

Vocational School Transportation 1,267.00 



Total Schools $252,776.73 

SCHOOL LUNCH 

Clerk $ 858.00 

Wages 9,599.62 

Food 18,652.85 

Misc. Supplies 635.04 

Misc. Equipment & Repairs 626.22 

Fuel 43.00 

Janitor Service 100.00 

All Other 71.13 

$ 30,585.86 



73 



PAYMENTS 



LIBRARY 



Librarian 


$ 1,800.00 




Asst. Librarians 


1,232.45 




Janitor Service 


239.00 




Books 


1,549.64 




Binding" Books 


46.55 




Fuel 


319.90 




Lights 


88.30 




Stationery, Postage, etc. 


19.60 




Misc. Equipment & Supplies 


405.52 




Travel 


22.42 




Repairs 


536.49 


6,259.87 






New Room at Library- 




2,748.58 


Total Library 


$ 


9,008.45 


UNCLASSIFIED 






Telephone 


$ 328.30 




Memorial Day 


520.80 




Care of Town Clock 


50.00 




Print and Deliver Town Reports 


903.00 




Outlays 


71.00 




Stabilization Fund 


45,000.00 




Unclassified 


44.05 




Dog Disposal 


85.00 




Sanatorium Assessment 


7,752.76 




Planning Board Expense 


119.00 




Retirement Assessment 


4,299.50 




Youth League 


200.00 






9 KQ QTO At 




«P 


V%/,%J 1 U.TJ. 


INSURANCE 






Monies and Securities 


$ 75.00 




Town Schedule 


2,788.84 




Auto Liab., Prop. Dam., Comprehensive 


1,653.61 




Workmen's Compensation 


2,091.93 




Volunteer Firemen 


154.50 




Public Liability 


777.42 

• 


7 kai 3ft 



74 



PAYMENTS 








WATER DEPARTMENT 








Commissioners' Salaries 




$ 


900.00 


Collector's Salary 


$ 


819.35 




Clerical 




180.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 




100.08 




Labor 




2,032.50 




Pipe & Fittings, etc. 




1,683.99 




Rent of Equipment 




125.00 




Fuel, Light, Power 




537.31 




Chlorine 




266.00 




Care of Chlorinator 




600.00 




Henley-Lundgren Contract 




603.22 




All Other 




264.32 


7,211.77 








Explore & Develop Underground Supply 






2,093.50 


Develop Underground Supply 






26,567.34 


Purchase Land Underground Supply 






4,675.00 


Purchase Easements Underground Supply 




$ 


227.00 


Total Water Department 


41,674.61 


CEMETERIES 








Clerk 


$ 


50.00 




Labor 




1,028.50 




Postage 




5.00 




Repair Monuments — bases 




900.00 




All Other 




11.75 








£ 


1,995.25 






v 


INTEREST 








Water Loan 


$ 


210.00 




School Building Loan 




11,250.00 








$ "• 






y 


J.J. f 1\JV.VV 


MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 




School Loan 


$ 20,000.00 




Water Loan 




4,000.00 
S 


24.000.00 



75 
PAYMENTS 

REFUNDS 

Real Estate $ 886.05 

Motor Vehicle Excise 1,749.01 



1> 
AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 


State Audit Tax 


$ 1,323.10 


State Parks Tax 


1,740.84 


Motor Vehicle Excise Bills Assessment 


282.60 


County Tax 


28,239.90 


Dog Tax Due County 


631.75 


Teachers' Health & Accident 


498.36 


Cemetery Perpetual Care — New 


400.00 


Cemetery Perpetual Care — Interest 


8.76 


State Withholding 


3,146.17 


Federal Withholding 


27,093.70 


Retirement 


3^70.24 


Blue Cross 


8,420.30 


Insurance 


1,224.07 



2,635.06 



$ 76,879.79 

Total Payments $691,081.44 

Balance January 1, 1966 181,669.78 



TOTAL $872,751.22 



76 



























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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1965 



89 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Stanley J. Sliwoski, Chairman Term Expires 1967 

Ethel I. Byrne, Secretary Term Expires 1966 

Henry F. Kulesza Term Expires 1968 

Regular school committee meetings are held 

at Elementary School 

on the second Tuesday of each month 

or at a time convenient to the members of 

the school committee. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John A. Skarzynski 
School Office: Home Address: 

High School Building King Street 

Telephone : 247-2361 Hatfield, Mass. 

WORK CERTIFICATES AND SCHOOL CLERK 

Marie P. Sheehan 

15 Chestnut Street 

Office telephone 247-2361 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Robert C. Byrne, M.D. 

46 Main Street 

Telephone 247-2661 

Alfred J. Kaiser, M.D. 

School Street 

Telephone 247-5751 



90 

SCHOOL NURSE 

Mrs. Lucille Godek, R.N. 
19 Prospect Street 



CORPS OF TEACHERS 1965 - 1966 

Superintendent of Schools and Principal of 
Smith Academy- 
John A. Skarzynski 
Driver Education 

Smith Academy 

Florence E. Muller, Assistant Principal 
French I, II, III ; Latin II, Guidance 

Margaret E. Pruzynski 

Typing I, II; Shorthand I, II; 

Secretarial Practices 

Mary A. Spakowski 
Home Economics; Biology; Jr. Business Math 

John H. Naumowicz 

English II-A, III-A, IV- A, III-B; 

Humanities 

Leonard A. Yarrows 

Algebra II ; Plane Geometry ; Advanced Math ; 

Chemistry; Physics 

Richard S. Nadolny 

English II-B, IV-B ; Economics ; Typing I ; 

Business Training; Bookkeeping; 

High School Soccer Coach ; Jr. High Basketball Coach 

B. Janet Livingston 
U.S. History ; Civics ; Problems of Democracy 



91 



Center School — Junior High 

Grades 7, 8, 9 
Dorothy Breor, Principal 

Jean Kempisty, Assistant Principal 
Grades 7, 8 ; Social Studies, Music, Glee Club 

Maxwell Moczulewski 

Grade 9 ; Math ; Algebra ; Math Club ; 

High School Basketball Coach 

Joseph F. Savage — Grade 8 

Reading ; English ; School Paper 

High School JV Basketball and Jr. High Baseball Coach 

Caroline Kozera — Grade 9 

English; Conversational French; French I, H; 

French Club ; Girls' Basketball Coach 

Arthur Andrews — Grade 7 

Science; Art; Science Club 

High School Baseball and Jr. High Soccer Coach 

James A. Devlin — Grade 8 
English ; Reading ; Latin ; Library Club 

John D. Leary, Jr. — Grade 9 
World History ; General Science ; General Math ; Math 



Elementary School 

Dorothy Breor, Principal — Remedial Reading 

Grade 6 
Frances Celatka Bernadette Pipczynski 

Grade 5 
Cynthia Tessier Virginia Klaes 

Grade 4 
Hilda Fortsch Patricia Klaes 





92 






Grade 3 




Anne Tierney 


Grade 2 


Ann Labbee 


Eleanor Stenglein 


Grade 1 


Martha Boyle 


Helen Kostek 




Lura Bieda 



Supervisors 

Music — Esther Norris 

Penmanship — William Rinehart Co. 

Physical Education — Clyde W. Meyerhoefer 

Custodians 

Elementary — Mitchell Kempisty 

Center School — Chester Celatka 

High School — John Besko 



John W. Maroney 
Frank Skroski, Jr. - 



Transporters 

— Regular School Transportation 

- Vocational School Transportation 



School Lunch Workers 



Winifred Betsold, Manager 
Wanda Shea 
Bertha Kosakowski 
Mary Winters 



Hazel Roberts, Asst. Mgr. 

Mary Vachula 

Phyllis Kuzontkoski 

Clara Shea 



93 



Report of the School Committee 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield: 

As we all know, the struggle to maintain a modern 
school system is a never ending battle. Throughout the 
nation, increased enrollment, higher cost for both materi- 
als and services, plus greater requirements placed upon 
our students by the world we live in, all combine to in- 
crease steadily the school demands on the taxpayer. 

We feel very strongly that our schools are one area 
where we cannot lag. Students leaving our school system 
face the same competition as students from wealthier 
communities. While we may limit our curriculum, we 
cannot for one minute neglect the basic subjects neces- 
sary for our graduate going out into the world today. 

We are well aware of the problems facing our com- 
munity and greatly appreciate the interest and coopera- 
tion shown by so many of our citizens. We sincerely hope 
that we may continue to enjoy this confidence and that 
working together, we may show even greater improve- 
ment in time to come. The continuing expansion of our 
school population and the ever-increasing demands made 
on the students make it imperative for the school com- 
mittee to constantly evaluate and adopt progressive meas- 
ures in order to maintain Hatfield's tradition of a top level 
educational system. 



94 

In reviewing the events which took place during the 
past 12 months, we find that the school committee ef- 
fectively carried out its obligation and responsibilities. 
Eleven regular meetings and four special meetings were 
held during the year. 

A complete list of school personnel can be found in 
another section of this report. In reviewing the teaching 
staff situation, we found one change took place in the 
senior high school. 

Mr. David Prentiss, resigned to become guidance di- 
rector in the Gardner, Massachusetts junior high 
school. 

Miss B. Janet Livingston, elected teacher in Smith 
Academy. 

Mr. Clyde Meyerhoefer, elected physical education 
director for all grades. 

Your school committee calls your attention to the 
school statistical section of this report. The enrollment 
table emphasizes the continued growth of this community 
and the impact on the school system. A continuation of an 
increase caused by new home construction, move-ins, small 
classes graduating with large classes entering grade one, 
means that the community is faced with overtaxed facili- 
ties. The Hatfield School Building Committee has made a 
detailed study of the housing problem and the School Com- 
mittee endorses enthusiastically, the recommendations of 
the building committee. The developyment of a long-range 
projection of student population and a carefully matched 
organization of needs and proposed facilities is a desirable 
blueprint for orderly growth and reasonable planning. 

If the school committee is to continue to promote a 
good educational program, the continued support of the 



95 



citizens and elected and appointed officials of Hatfield is 
necessary in the years ahead. 

The school committee has given a long and careful 
study to the budget and considers its request a minimum 
to operate the school system efficiently and successfully 
in 1966. The Hatfield Finance Committee and School Com- 
mittee have met and discussed the school budget. It should 
be noted that the money which is received in the form of 
receipts and reimbursements from all sources on account 
of the public schools during 1965 does not find its way 
back into the school department budget. These funds go 
directly to the town treasurer's office and into the Reserve 
Fund where they may be used for other town purposes or 
eventually used for the reduction of taxes. Your atten- 
tion is directed to the financial section which includes re- 
imbursements to the town. 

Contracts this past year were awarded to the follow- 
ing concerns: the oil contract to the Maroney Oil Com- 
pany for # 4 fuel oil ; and Norwood Oil Co., Inc. for #2 fuel 
oil ; the regular school transportation contract to the Ma- 
roney Bus Company, and the vocational transportation to 
the Skroski Bus Company. 

Besides the ordinary maintenance carried out during 
the year, the following maintenance and repair program 
was carried out. At the elementary school the Venetian 
blinds were cleaned, interior sash were painted, additional 
sidewalks were constructed and the furnace was repaired. 
At the junior high school the exterior of the school was 
painted, the univents were overhauled, the sidewalks were 
hard-topped with the assistance of the highway depart- 
ment, two poplar trees were removed through the co- 
operation of the tree warden, and one classroom was 
painted. The basketball bleachers were also painted. 



96 

The trustees of Smith Academy carried out neces- 
sary maintenance and repairs to the Smith Academy 
building. Fire doors were installed on all floors according 
to the specifications of the state building inspector. Be- 
cause of the increased enrollment, a second water cooler 
was installed. These repairs were taken care of without 
cost to the town. The trustees have been very cooperative 
in maintaining the building and definitely deserve a vote 
of appreciation. 

The following pieces of new equipment were added 
to the school system: four typewriters, file cabinet, wall 
clocks, 2 water coolers, portable phonographs, reading 
chairs, photocopier, dry copier, and one athletic bus. 

The Hatfield School Committee is generally repre- 
sented at the area, as well as the annual state and nation- 
al meetings. 

The committee wishes to publicly thank the Parent- 
Teacher Council for the generous donation of movie 
screens to all three buildings. 

The committee is pleased to acknowledge the inter- 
est of the following citizens and civic clubs in the educa- 
tion of our students. The following honors are awarded 
to deserving members of the high school graduating class : 

American Legion Post Awards 

Hatfield Book Club Annual Literary Award 

Woman's Club of the Holy Trinity Catholic Church 
Award 

Woman's Endeavor Society Award 

M. Larkin Proulx Award 



97 

The Parent-Teacher Council Awards 
Hatfield Teachers Club Award 
Suzanne M. Novak Memorial Award 
Hatfield Junior Drum Corps Awards 

Both the superintendent's and elementary- junior 
high principal's reports carry a more detailed account of 
the activities of the Hatfield Public Schools. These re- 
ports were read and approved by the school committee 
and your attention is called to them. 

Mrs. Susan Zima, cafeteria worker, retired after 
many years of faithful service. The school committee ex- 
tends to her best wishes for a long, happy and blessed re- 
tirement. 

In conclusion , the school committee wishes to ac- 
knowledge with great appreciation, the cooperation and 
support of the administrators, school staff and personnel, 
Parent-Teacher Council, town officers, town departments 
and townspeople for their help and assistance in making 
the school year a successful one. The public schools are 
the responsibility of every citizen and their continued 
support will be critically needed in the years ahead. 



Respectfully submitted, 

STANLEY J. SLIWOSKI 
ETHEL I. BYRNE 
HENRY F. KULESZA 



98 



Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and Citizens of the 
Town of Hatfield: 

I hereby submit my eighth annual report as Superin- 
tendent of Schools of Hatfield. 

To combine the desirable with the possible in the 
proper proportion to insure the continued educational 
growth of the children of Hatfield has been our aim dur- 
ing the past year and will continue to be the goal for the 
coming year. How much of the desirable has been made 
possible is realized especially at this time of the year 
when annual reports are studied. An atmosphere of un- 
derstanding and cooperation on the part of the school 
committee, intelligent, inspired teaching, prudent plan- 
ning, long hours of unselfish work on the part of the staff 
are all committed to one purpose, namely to help the child 
grow. That so many are truly committed to this one pur- 
pose constitutes the chief asset of this school system and 
a major asset in the town of Hatfield. 

1965 was another year wherein your staff continued 
to make efforts to provide an education in keeping with 
the tremendous changes in technology and the demands 
in manufacturing, business and in the professions. They 
continued working to establish ways and means in order 
that the children in the town of Hatfield, with interest 
and aptitude toward any occupation or profession, would 
be adequately prepared and equipped to further their edu- 
cation and meet their objectives. 



99 

Schools are erected to accommodate the processes of 
instructing youth and the form and control of education 
is influenced somewhat by the building which contains 
them. Let us remember that while schools are shaped by 
the community, the community is shaped by the schools 
and buildings. Every school affects the spirit, the morale 
of the pupils, the looks, the desirability, and the assessed 
wealth of the town and the future of the community 
which builds it. Everywhere there is a search for econo- 
my and there are always opponents to new buildings. 
However, economy is a slippery word. To some it means 
cheap ; to others it means a minimum of maintenance and 
to others it will always mean a good building that will 
continue to serve and function effectively for years after 
it is built. 

There has been a steady growth in the school popula- 
tion over the past years, and with this growth, added 
school facilities are needed, especially on the secondary 
level. As one examines the increase he can conclude that 
school housing ranks as our number one problem. The 
Hatfield School Building Committee has been at work try- 
in gto reach a solution. It would be proper to give your 
support to the reports and recommendations of this com- 
mittee. 

The New England Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Schools, the commission on accreditation of high 
schools, evaluated Smith Academy in May 1963. At that 
time, Smith Academy was accredited as a "Class A" high 
school for a two-year period. In May 1965 a two-year 
progress report was submitted and contained a record of 
what had been done with regard to the recommendations 
made in the original report of 1963. It must be remem- 
bered that much of the NEASC's report concerned itself 
with the lack of, and the inadequacy of space at the high 



100 

school. Our enrollment continually increases, making the 
needs even more critical. Our average class size continues 
to increase and the lack of rooms and proper size rooms 
has made proper instruction difficult. On July 9, 1965, we 
received a letter stating "The Commission voted to extend 
the membership of Smith Academy for one year hoping 
that by the end of that time some positive steps could be 
taken toward the solution of these problems" (particu- 
larly the area of the school plant and the school library) . 
A report must be made to the commission by June 1, 1966 
as to what has been done or planned. If no action is taken, 
Smith Academy runs the risk of losing its accreditation 
and this could be harmful to the graduates of our high 
school. 

This year the elementary school is accommodating 
336 pupils, 56 more than it did when it opened in 1960. 
This increase is taxing this building to its maximum. On 
June 4, 1959, the Trustees of Smith Academy sent a letter 
to the school committee stating that the capacity of the 
Smith Academy building is 120 students from a stand- 
point of classroom capacity and safety measures. With 
this in mind the school committee transferred the 9th 
grade to the Center School building in September 1961. 
Presently there are 137 pupils housed in the high school 
building, and all indications point only to increased en- 
rollment. 

Examining our pattern of pupil growth over the last 
ten years, we find our school population has increased from 
386 students to 620 students for 1965, an increase of 234 
students. If we project this same conservative rate of 
growth for the next ten years until our present second 
graders become 12th graders, we can expect a total school 
enrollment of better than 800 students by 1975. Our pres- 
ent facilities are overcrowded and classrooms are needed 



101 



just to house the excess, to say nothing about providing 
laboratories, special classrooms, kitchen and cafeteria, 
auditorium, gymnasium, and administrative space. 

A school building committee has been appointed. 
They have concluded that the present space problem is 
most acute at the secondary level. They have lost two 
possible solutions and soon will present a third. Time is a 
factor and the situation only increases. Your support of 
their findings and recommendations is requested for the 
good of the students of the Hatfield Schools. Your atten- 
tion is directed to their report. 

Each possible solution affects the local picture — 
both financially and educationally, and therefore answers 
are not easy to come by. In fact, there will be no one per- 
fect solution. Sometimes this slow deliberation annoys 
concerned parents who have the best intentions — but 
would circumvent the state's role and jurisdiction in con- 
struction of schools — a suggestion not so easily accom- 
plished. 

Our deliberations cannot go on much longer without 
action — lest we resort to double sessions and loss of 
accreditation. 

When a decision is finally reached by the town, it will 
require the courage of informed leadership and the force 
of constructive community action. It will require, above 
all, that people work together. 

It is my duty to inform the school committee and 
townspeople of the needs of the public schools and to en- 
courage them to support the growth and development of 
our school program so vital to the future success of the 
children of Hatfield. 



102 

It is well to keep in mind the reimbursements which 
are received by the town on account of education. Please 
note the expenses and reimbursements in the financial 
section. 

In 1965 we took greater advantage of the NDEA acts 
and purchased more Title III and Title V materials on a 
federal matching basis. Applications under Title I, ESEA 
and the Vocational Education Act were also filed. 

Major textbook revisions took place in several areas 
and supplies and equipment were purchased as needed. A 
large number of students continue to participate in a num- 
ber of activities under the direction of faculty sponsors 
during the activity period held on Monday afternoons. 
Periodic special assemblies were also held. Miss Martha 
Belden, a senior, received a letter of commendation from 
the National Merit Scholarship Program. She is the third 
student to be honored by this corporation in the past two 
years. 

Though not a new, but a great improvement, took 
place this past year — namely the addition of a full-time 
physical education director. Physical education is now an 
integral part of the total educational program. Its aim is 
to provide for the intellectual, physical, social, and emo- 
tional development of all students. The physical develop- 
ment of the student is provided through a series of activi- 
ties which develop the fitness, strength, speed and co-ordi- 
nation of every student. Activities are included in the 
program which place the student in situations calling for 
competition and cooperation, and as a result help in devel- 
oping the social and emotional aims of education. This 
program is a definite asset to the schools and should we 
acquire improved facilities in the future, the town will 
see its full value. 



103 



To a great extent, modern education places emphasis 
upon the individual child. Their needs are governed by 
the student level of ability and also by the knowledge he 
has gained from previous schooling. It is impossible to 
accurately determine these factors. However, we can ap- 
proximate these factors through the use of standardized 
tests. Test results enable us to understand the student 
and to adopt the educational process to his individual 
needs. The main tests taken are the CEEB, National 
Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test, PSAT, IQ's and the 
GATB which is administered by the Massachusetts Divi- 
sion of Employment Security for those planning to enter 
the labor market. Other tests are given as needed and are 
supervised by the Guidance Department. 

The custodians in the school buildings did all the nec- 
essary maintenance work during the summer and all three 
buildings were in excellent shape when school opened in 
September. They deserve special commendation for the 
maintenance of our school buildings. 

The town should be commended for raising the sta- 
bilization fund over the minimum amount. With a possible 
school building program, this will result in tremendous 
savings to the town. It would be wise to bring this fund 
over the maximum so that greater savings can be real- 
ized. 

This past June 45 students were graduated and of 
this number, 33 have gone on to further their education. 

The rule regarding the entrance age of pupils is as 
follows: Any child who attains the age of six during the 
year in which entrance to the first grade is sought may 
attend school beginning in September of that year. For 
example: a child having his sixth birthday on any day, 



104 

including or between January 1, 1966 and December 31, 
1966, may enroll and attend school beginning September 
1966. 

It is the policy of the Hatfield School Department to 
hold regular sessions when it is practicable to operate the 
school buses. Parents are asked to use their own discre- 
tion as to the wisdom of sending their children to school 
on stormy mornings. In the event that it becomes neces- 
sary to cancel school sessions, the "No School Signal" will 
be broadcast over radio station WHMP starting at 6 a.m. 
and continuing through 8:30 a.m. The authorities of 
WHMP request that parents not call the radio station for 
this information, but listen for the announcements. 

National Education Week was observed from Novem- 
ber 8-12, 1965. Special times were set aside through the 
week for private parent-teacher conferences. The schools 
held open house on Tuesday evening of that week. The 
large number of parents who scheduled conferences and 
visited the schools was heart-warming and once again it 
showed that interest in the children and schools is high. 
Education Week opened with the showing of the senior 
high school play entitled, "Hillbilly Wedding" under the 
direction of Mr. John Naumowicz of the Smith Academy 
faculty. 

The bus routes were revised in September and the 
routes will be adhered to for the remainder of the year. 
A copy of the present routes follows this report. 

Released time for religious instruction was offered 
again this year. The following times are set aside each 
week so that pupils may benefit from religious instruction 
in denominations of their own choosing. Released time 
started on September 22, 1965 and will end on May 18, 
1966. 



105 

Wednesday 10:45-11:30 Smith Academy students 
Wednesday 12:45- 1:30 Grades 6, 7, 8, and 9 
Wednesday 1:50- 2:40 Grades 2, 3, 4, and 5 

An open-door policy is a vital part of our community- 
centered schools. Our teachers are an integral part of the 
open-door policy and are willing to help any parent. Par- 
ents are invited to visit us and see what and how their 
children learn in the classroom, but are requested to check 
through the principal's office first. 

For a more detailed report about our elementary and 
junior high schools, your attention is directed to Mrs. 
Breor's principal's report. 

To the faculty and staff, I acknowledge the support 
and efficient teaching you have given in achieving a school 
system of which we can all be proud. 

May I, at this time, extend my sincere appreciation 
for the cooperation and assistance rendered by the mem- 
bers of the school committee, principal, school personnel, 
Hatfield School Building Committee, town officials and de- 
partments, and townspeople, to make this school year a 
succesful one. 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI 
Superintendent of Schools 



106 



Bus Route 



Elementary 
Run#l 

Bus leaves the high school, up School Street, down 
Prospect Street, up Bridge Street, left on Dwight 
Street, right on Elm Street, turn around at town line, 
back down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down Main 
Street to Elementary School. 

Run #2 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, up Dwight 
Street, down Main Highway to make first pickup, 
left on Linseed Road to Stoddard residence, turn 
around, back down Linseed Road to Main Highway, 
left, down Main Highway to Harubin's Service Sta- 
tion. Bus turns around here, takes right at Wolfram's 
Garage, left down Pantry Road, down to Main High- 
way, left at and down Chestnut Street, down School 
Street, down Main Street to Elementary School. 

Run #3 

Bus leaves the high school, to Bradstreet, to Whately 
town line, turns around, back down River Road, right 
at Bradstreet Cafe, to Main Highway, left down 
Prospect Street, down Chestnut Street, down School 
Street, to Elementary School. 



107 

Junior and Senior High School 

Run#l 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street Station to Bradstreet, 
left at Bradstreet Cafe to Main Highway, left down 
Prospect Street, down Chestnut Street, down School 
Street, to High School. 

Run #2 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street Station, down Bridge 
Street, up Prospect Street, up Chestnut Street, right 
on Main Highway to Wolfram's Garage, left here and 
left again down Pantry Road, down Main Highway, 
left, down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down Main 
Street to High School. 

Run #3 

Bus leaves Bridge Street Station, down Dwight 
Street, down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down 
Main Street to High School. 



108 



Principal of the Elementary and 
Junior High Schools 



To the School Committee and the 
Superintendent of Schools : 

I wish to submit this tenth annual report as principal 
of the Center Junior High School and the Hatfield Elemen- 
tary School. 

To keep pace with the demands on our educational 
program by society today and by the ever changing needs, 
abilities, and interests of the students, it is our responsi- 
bility to continually study and evaluate the curriculum 
offered each individual and to make adjustments that are 
deemed necessary. Therefore, each year there must be 
changes in our curriculum offerings. 

It is evident that the parents of our school children 
are aware that their children need more than an elemen- 
tary and secondary education to assure them of a secure 
and successful future. 

At the junior high this past year, a high per cent of 
the students elected to take the college course. This neces- 
sitated changes. The college-bound group had to be divid- 
ed into two sections — those that showed the greatest 
potential, interest, and ability were placed in one track 
and the others in a second track. Therefore, we have two 
sections in Latin I, Algebra I, and world history. It was 
also necessary to drop the reading course at the ninth 
grade level as very few elected to take it. 



109 

A full time physical education instructor was hired 
for the first time in the history of our schools. The sched- 
ule rotates so that the students at the junior high will not 
miss the same classes each time they have physical educa- 
tion. 

Mr. Meyerhoef er, the new instructor, meets with the 
junior high students twice a week and with the elemen- 
tary children once a week. 

It is our policy to have every pupil participate in this 
program unless he has a doctor's report which states 
otherwise. 

With the purchase of necessary equipment to imple- 
ment such a physical fitness program, a variety of inter- 
esting activities are offered. 

Mr. Leary, who formerly was a part time physical 
education instructor, has become a classroom teacher at 
the junior high. He now teaches world history, general 
science, general math, and one class in eighth grade 
mathematics. 

At both schools new textbooks, equipment, and ma- 
terials were introduced to adequately provide the neces- 
sary tools for the development of knowledge and concepts 
in all areas of instruction. Basic textbooks in science, 
math, and Latin were purchased for grades seven through 
nine. In grades four and six, science books were intro- 
duced and our English series were completed in grades 
two, three, and five. 

The new skill texts have a phonetic approach to spell- 
ing that should improve word-attack skills, spelling, and 
vocabulary. They should indirectly improve and reinforce 
many of the reading skills. 



110 

Much new audio-visual equipment has been added to 
supplement and enrich the classroom instruction. We 
point with pride to the projection tables and wall screens 
that the Hatfield Parent-Teacher Council so generously 
purchased for both schools. 

Since the elementary school does not have a central 
library and the junior high has only a limited number of 
volumes, we depend upon the Hatfield Public Library to 
provide materials for our school children. 

Throughout the years we have tried various ways to 
improve our reading program. At the present time we are 
using a co-basal reading program and co-operating teach- 
ers. This means that children are grouped according to 
their reading needs, disregarding the grade level of the 
individuals. With this organization the teachers have 
more time to spend with the reading groups assigned to 
them and the students have a better opportunity to suc- 
ceed. 

Many field trips were offered our pupils this past year 
to enrich their classroom experiences. Trips were taken 
to historic Boston, the cultural center of New York City, 
the World's Fair, and many places in our immediate 
vicinity that had educational value. 

The schools observed National Education Week No- 
vember eighth through the thirteenth. Private parent- 
teacher conferences were held with the parents of our 
school children, and Open-House was observed Tuesday 
evening in all the schools of the community to acquaint 
the townspeople with the school environment and its 
activities. Numerous interesting displays were viewed 
through the week. The entire program was a great suc- 
cess. 



Ill 

Periodical reliable measurement of the child's achieve- 
ment and development of certain skills is essential for ef- 
fective supervision of instruction and individualization of 
teaching. To enable teachers and administrators to evalu- 
ate the educational accomplishments and abilities of each 
pupil, a wide range of tests are used throughout the year. 
This year the following tests were used : 

Stanford Achievement Tests — Grades 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 

Otis Alpha M.A. Tests — Grades 1, 3 

Otis Beta M.A. Tests — Grades 5, 8 

Scott, Foresman Basic Reading Tests — Grades 1-6 

Ginn Basic Reading Tests — Grades 2-6 

The results of these tests are used by administrators 
to evaluate and identify those areas of the instructional 
program that need greater emphasis or curriculum re- 
organization. 

The test results indicate that the majority of our stu- 
dents rated on a par or better than the national averages. 

In closing, may I express my sincere appreciation to 
the School Committee, the Superintendent of Schools, the 
staff, the custodians, the pupils, and the townspeople for 
their assistance throughout the school year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

(MRS.) DOROTHY BREOR 

Principal 



112 



School Savings 



The three mutual savings banks — Florence Savings 
Bank, Nonotuck Savings Bank, and Northampton Institu- 
tion for Savings — are the sponsors of the School Savings 
program that takes place every week in Hatfield. 

TUESDAYS are bank days in Elementary and Cen- 
ter Schools — MONDAYS in Smith Academy. 

Any amount from 5^ up may be deposited in school 
on Tuesdays. These deposits, if made consistently, build 
to a substantial sum. Several times during the year, bal- 
ances are transferred to regular interest-bearing accounts 
in order that students will not lose their interest. 

In Smith Academy many students make club pay- 
ments on Mondays. There are two clubs from which to 
choose — 50 <f or $1 weekly. The 50^ club expires at $25 
and the $1 club at $50. 

Clubs are a systematic method for accumulating 
funds for specific purposes. These are really all-purpose 
clubs; inasmuch as there are no expiration dates. Clubs 
may be paid for one or more weeks at a time. When the 
club is fully paid, money may be had by simply taking 
the book to the bank. 

Last year $13,158.90 was deposited in Hatfield 
schools. This is an increase of $1,874.90 over the pre- 
vious year. 



113 

It is hoped that the parents and the teachers will 
offer encouragement for school banking. The thrift habit 
is worthwhile and one that can be cultivated at an early 
age. It is good to have a goal, something to save for, and 
a big satisfaction to achieve the goal. 



Respectfully submitted, 

(MRS.) V. S. CONNORS 

School Savings Director 



114 

School Health 



To the Superintendent and 
School Committee of Hatfield : 

I wish to submit this 14th annual report as the school 
nurse of Hatfield. 

The basic purpose of the school health program is 
two-fold: to assure that each child achieves the most of 
which he is capable from his educational opportunity, and 
to provide a healthy adult population for the future. To 
achieve this, the school must inculcate sound health 
habits, give factual health instruction, provide an environ- 
ment that is safe, pleasant and emotionally understanding 
and recognize and refer for treatment children with physi- 
cal, emotional and social handicaps. 

Thorough physical examinations were given to all 
pupils in grades 1, 4, 7, 9, 12, and athletes of grades 8, 10, 
and 11. Four students were referred for X-ray because 
of poor posture. The number of students in need of den- 
tal care has decreased appreciably. There are several who 
are still considerably overweight who have been advised 
in regard to diet and exercise. 

The Vision test was given to 622 pupils with 46 fail- 
ing the retest. Of this number, 37 were seen by an eye 
specialist and received correction, while 9 failed to report. 

The Pure Tone hearing test was given to 620 pupils, 
with 18 failing the retest. Of this number, 11 were seen 
by an ear specialist while 9 did not report. 



115 

The Tine Tuberculosis test was administered in May 
to children in grades 1, 4, 8, and 12. Of the 208 who took 
the test, there were 200 who had negative readings, with 
8 positive. All 8 were X-rayed and were reported as nega- 
tive. 

Booster clinics for Diphtheria-Tetanus-Whooping 
Cough and Sabin Oral Vaccine were held in the spring. 
There were 47 pupils who received the triple antigen, 26 
received the double antigen, 21 the Sabin Oral Booster and 
11 who completed the Sabin series. 

Flu vaccine was again offered to the faculty with 28 
members receiving the Booster dose. 

Communicable diseases reported during the year are 
as follows: 

Chicken Pox 10 Measles 6 

Registration for incoming first grade children was 
held in May with 49 youngsters reporting. 

The annual census of all children residing in Hatfield 
under age 16 was completed in October, as well as the an- 
nual census of physically handicapped children. 

My sincerest appreciation is extended to the physi- 
cians, school officials, teachers and parents for their as- 
sistance and cooperation in the school health program. 



Respectfully submitted, 

LUCILLE H. GODEK, R.N. 



116 



School Lunch 



Good health is essential if our Nation's youth is to 
achieve optimum health and physical fitness and receive 
maximum benefit from the educational process. One-third 
of the day's nutritional requirement should be supplied at 
lunch time. The school lunch program makes available 
each day a "Type A" lunch that meets the requirements 
of the National School Lunch Program. The child gets 
one-third of his daily nutritional requirements. A "Type 
A" lunch contains as a minimum : two ounces cooked, lean 
meat, poultry or fish or two ounces of cheese ; one egg or 
one-half cup cooked dry beans or dry peas, or four table- 
spoons of peanut butter or an equivalent quantity of a 
combination of two of these items, served in a main dish 
or in a main dish and one other menu item; three-fourths 
cup serving of two or more vegetables or fruits, or both; 
one slice enriched bread or the equivalent ; two teaspoons 
butter; one-half pint whole, unflavored milk. No dessert 
is required, but we include one with every hot lunch 
served. Special attention is given to include adequate 
servings of Vitamin C rich food daily and Vitamin A food 
twice a week. 

The two school cafeterias serve an average of 536 
meals a day. They are ably staffed by the following quali- 
fied personnel : Mrs. Winifred Betsold, manager, and Mrs. 
Hazel Roberts, assistant manager. Their assistants are 
Mrs. Wanda Shea, Mrs. Bertha Kosakowski, Mrs. Mary 
Vachula, Mrs. Phyllis Kuzontkoski, Mrs. Mary Winters, 
and Mrs. Clara Shea. 



117 

The cafeteria personnel once again attended the state 
sponsored School Lunch Conferences this year. 

Equipment and utensils, as needed, have been pur- 
chased for both cafeterias. 

The menus of the school lunch program are published 
in the daily newspapers and are also posted in the class- 
rooms. State and Federal Aid in the form of cash re- 
imbursements and food donations make it possible to offer 
the hot lunch to students for 25 cents, and the amount of 
food value received for this price is the best bargain one 
can get. The elementary and junior high pupils are super- 
vised by the homeroom teachers, with over-all supervision 
by the principal, Mrs. Dorothy Breor. The high school stu- 
dents are supervised by the high school teachers with 
over-all supervision by the high school principal, Mr. John 
A. Skarzynski. 

The financial account of the lunch program can be 
found in the town accountant's report which appears in 
another section of this town report. 

The following is an accounting of the number of 
lunches served during the past year : 





Days 
Lunch Served 


No. of 
Lunches Served 


January 


15 


10,803 


February 


15 


8,262 


March 


23 


12,289 


April 


19 


9,977 


May 


20 


10,305 



118 



June 


11 


5,555 


September 


17 


9,540 


October 


19 


10,491 


November 


18 


9,755 


December 


16 
18 


8,497 




95,474 




Respectfully submitted, 






JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI 


- 


Director, Hatfield School Lunch 



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121 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 1965 



Regular Day School 



Regular day school : 

Appropriation for support $236,267.00 

Unexpended balance, returned 
to Surplus Cash 188.45 



Total expenditures for support $236,078.55 
Expenditures from PL 874 2,721.40 

Expenditures from PL 864 1,911.24 



Total expenditures $240,711.19 

Credits : Reimbursements to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

General School Fund (Chap. 70) $ 33,943.00 
Transportation (Chap. 71) 7,581.60 



Total reimbursement for regular day school 

to Town of Hatfield from Commonwealth $ 41,524.60 

Credits : Reimbursement to School Committee 
from Federal Government : 

Federal Law — PL 874 $ 6,726.00 

Federal Law — PL 864 3,143.98 



Total reimbursement to School Committee 

received from Federal Government $ 9,869.98 



122 
Vocational Tuition and Transportation 

Vocational Tuition and Transportation : 

Appropriation for support $ 8,522.12 

Unexpended balance, returned 

to Surplus Cash 891.49 



Total support $ 7,630.63 

Credits: Reimbursements to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
Vocational Tuition and Transportation : 

Vocational Tuition $ 3,688.59 

Vocational Transportation 633.50 



Total reimbursement for Vocational Tuition 
and Transportation to Town of Hatfield from 
Commonwealth $ 4,322.09 



123 



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124 

HATFIELD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL BUDGET ESTIMATE 

1966 



Function : 




1000 


Administration 


$ 7,130.00 


2000 


Instruction 


202,776.00 


3000 


Other School Services 


16,500.00 


4000 


Operation & Maint. of Plant 


32,625.00 


5000 


Fixed Charges 


505.00 


7000 


Acquisition of Equipment 


1,200.00 



Total 1966 Budget Estimate $260,736.00 



1966 BUDGET ESTIMATE 

Administration — 1000 

Superintendent's Salary $ 4,100.00 

Clerk 1,800.00 

Work Certificates 300.00 

Census 85.00 

Office Expenses 230.00 

Superintendent's Expenses 350.00 

Superintendent's Out of State Travel 200.00 

Co-operative School Service Center 65.00 



Total $ 7,130.00 

Instruction — 2000 

Elementary Principal's Salary $ 6,043.00 
Elementary Office Expenses 50.00 

Elementary Principal's Expenses 50.00 



125 



Jr. High Principal's Salary 


3,021.00 


Jr. High Office Expenses 


50.00 


Jr. High Principal's Expenses 


50.00 


Secondary Principal's Salary 


6,667.00 


Secondary Office Expenses 


100.00 


Secondary Principal's Expenses 


125.00 


Graduation 


230.00 


Elementary Salaries 


74,880.00 


Music Salary 


2,960.00 


Penmanship 


540.00 


Salaries — Handicapped Children 


500.00 


ETV Membership 


90.00 


Miscellaneous 


125.00 


Junior High Salaries 


48,393.00 


Physical Education 


800.00 


Junior High Instructional Supplies 


1,400.00 


Secondary Salaries 


47,527.00 


Secondary Instructional Supplies 


1,825.00 


Driver Education 


250.00 


Elementary Textbooks 


1,700.00 


Junior High Textbooks 


800.00 


Secondary Textbooks 


1,150.00 


Elementary Library 


125.00 


Junior High Library 


150.00 


Secondary Library 


125.00 


Elementary A.V. Aids 


100.00 


Junior High A.V. Aids 


100.00 


Secondary A.V. Aids 


100.00 


Elementary Instructional Supplies 


2,750.00 


Total 


202,776.00 


Other School Services 


— 3000 


Nurse's Salary $ 


2,700.00 


Health Supplies 


100.00 


Nurse's Expenses 


100.00 



126 



Transportation 12,600.00 

Athletic Transportation 1,000.00 



Total 16,500.00 

Operation & Maintenance of Plant — 4000 



Elementary Custodial Salary $ 


5,000.00 


Elementary Custodial Supplies 


2,000.00 


Junior High Custodial Salary 


4,400.00 


Junior High Custodial Supplies 


900.00 


Secondary Custodial Salary 


4,000.00 


Secondary Custodial Supplies 


650.00 


Town Hall Custodial Supplies 


160.00 


Elementary Fuel 


2,900.00 


Junior High Fuel 


2,100.00 


Secondary Fuel 


1,200.00 


Elementary Electricity 


3,100.00 


Elementary Telephone 


185.00 


Junior High Electricity 


300.00 


Junior High Telephone 


190.00 


Secondary Electricity 


420.00 


Secondary Telephone 


270.00 


Alterations — Unclassified 


100.00 


School Street Maintenance & Repair 


100.00 


Elementary Maintenance & Repair 


1,095.00 


ETV Maintenance 


110.00 


Junior High Maintenance & Repair 


2,795.00 


Secondary Maintenance & Repair 


170.00 


Maintenance, Classroom, typewriters 


230.00 


School Vehicles 

" 


250.00 



Total 32,625.00 



127 

Fixed Charges "— 5000 

Athletic Insurance $ 455.00 

Liability Insurance 50.00 



Total 505.00 

Acquisition of Equipment — 7000 

New Equipment $ 1,200.00 



Total 1,200,00 



TOTAL BUDGET ESTIMATE $260,736.00 



Sept. 


7 


Sept. 


8 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


25 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


24 


Nov. 


29 


Dec. 


23 



1966 



128 

HATFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1965 - 1966 



Staff meeting — 9 :30 a.m. 

Schools open — full sessions 

Columbus Day — no school 

Teachers' Convention — no school 

Veterans' Day — no school 

Thanksgiving recess 

Schools close at noon — no lunch 

Schools open — full sessions 

Christmas recess 

Schools close at noon — no lunch 



Schools reopen — full sessions 

Schools close for winter vacation 

Schools reopen — full sessions 

Good Friday — No school 

One day spring vacation and Patriots' Day 

— no school 

Schools reopen — full sessions 

Memorial Day — no school 

Elementary School pupils dismissed with 
(182 days) report cards. 

Teachers will report until closing details 

completed. 
June 17 Junior and Senior High School students 

(183 days) dismissed with report cards. 

Teachers will report until closing details 

completed. 

High School Graduation 



Jan. 


3 


Feb. 


18 


Feb. 


28 


Apr. 


8 


Apr. 


18,19 


Apr. 


20 


May 


30 


June 


16 





LUTHER A. BELDEN 
1908 — 1966 



Civic Leader 

Public Servant 

Gentleman 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1966 



Printed by 

Gazette Printing Co., Inc. 

Northampton, Mass. 



Town Officers for 1 965 



SELECTMEN 



George W. Rogalewski, Chairman 
Frank J. Godek Stanley J. Filipek 

MODERATOR 

Gordon A. Woodward 

TOWN CLERK - TREASURER 

Peter S. Rogaleski 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Mitchell W. Kempisty, Chairman 
Richard D. Belden Joseph S. Wilkes 

TAX COLLECTOR 

Thomas L. Mullany 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Stanley Sliwoski, Chairman 
Henry F. Kulesza Ethel I. Byrne 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Ralph F. Vollinger, Chairman 
Rupert Harubin John R. Rudy 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Arthur Cory Bardwell, Chairman 
William Podmayer Henry F. Szych 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Dorothy Breor, Chairman 
Margaret M. Wentzel Michael M. Majeskey 

ELECTOR UNDER THE WILL OF OLIVER SMITH 

Henry P. Betsold 

TREE WARDEN 

Francis E. Godin 

PLANNING BOARD 

Francis H. Hebert, Chairman 
William H. Burke, Jr. Henry F. Szych 

John S. Besko Stanley Sliwoski 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Thaddeus Kabat, Chairman 
Edward S, Kowalski Leon C. Maksimoski 

Alternates 
Harold Lyman William E. Boyle 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Atty. Elizabeth A. Porada 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Joseph V. Porada, Jr., Chairman 
Frederick J. Zehelski Edward J. Wickles 

6 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Howard B. Abbott, Chairman 

Joseph J. Pelc Peter S. Rogaleski 

Edward T. Kostek 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Gertrude B. Rogaleski 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

Joseph J. Deres 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS & SLAUGHTER 

Frank Sikorski, Jr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Albert E. Jenest — 210 Elm St., Greenfield 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS 

Charles J. Eberlein, Sr. 

COLLECTOR OF WATER RENTS 

Harold B. Lizek . 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

John A. Skarzynski 

DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Thomas P. Mullins 

WOOD SURVEYORS 

Bernard Donnis Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



Joseph V. Porada 
John Osley, Jr. 



Peter Kubosiak 
Elizabeth Porada 



Clifford L. Belden, Jr. 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Paul Stef ancik 

FENCE VIEWERS AND FIELD DRIVERS 

Michael M. Majeskey Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Henry J. Sliwoski 



CONSTABLES 



Henry J. Sliwoski 
James E. McGrath 
Joseph S. Wilkes 
Henry Kosakowski 
George W. Rogalewski 
Anthony Malinowski 
Stanley Malinowski 



Mitchell W. Kempisty 

Peter Kubosiak 

Stanley J. Filipek 

John Brennan 

William Podmayer 

Peter P. Backiel 

George Omasta 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Anthony J. Sikorski 
William A. Symanski 
Harold B. Lizer 
William Slowikowski 
Stanley S. Symanski 
David E. Omasta 



John Szych 



Adolf Ciszewski 

Stanley Jagodzinski 

Robert Thayer 

Ralph F. Vollinger 

Frank Godek 

Thaddeus Kabat 



SPECIAL POLICE 

Joseph Deres 

FIRE CHIEF 

Myron J. Sikorski 



FIREFIGHTERS 

Main Street Station 

Kempisty, Edward, Deputy Chief 

Proulx, Alfred, Deputy Chief 

Boyle, William, Captain 

Sikorski, Frank, Captain 

Kotch, Peter, Lieut. 

Lizek, David, Lieut. 

Balise, Kenneth 

Boyle, Marcus 

Gizinski, John 

Korza, Wiliam 

Osepowicz, Robert 

Pease, Marshall 



Pelis, Bernard 

Petrowicz, Charles 

Petrowicz, Richard 

Rogaleski, John 

Shaw, Bernard 

Shea, Robert 

Szych, Joseph 

Vollinger, Donald 

Vollinger, Richard 

Zgrodnik, George 

Dugal, Eugene 



North Hatfield Station 



Belden, Richard, Asst. Chief 
Baceski, Andrew 
Besko, John, Jr. 
Bielunis, Adam 
Kubilis, Louis 
Maiewski, Philip 



Mieleszko, Joseph 

Omasta, Michael 

Smiarowski, Teddy 

Stevens, Richard 

Symanski, Anthony 

Sysun, Connie 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Incorporated 1670 

AREA 

8900 Acres 

ELEVATION 

132 Feet at Main Street 

POPULATION 

1965 Census — 2708 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Second Hampshire District 

JOHN D. BARRUS 
Goshen, Mass. 

STATE SENATOR 

Franklin & Hampshire District 

CHARLES A. BISBEE, JR. 

Chesterfield, Mass. 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

First Congressional District 

SILVIO O. CONTE 
Pittsfield, Mass. 

SENATORS IN CONGRESS 

LEVERETT J. SALTONSTALL 
Dover, Mass. 

EDWARD M. KENNEDY 
Boston, Mass. 



10 



Selectmen's Warrant 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To either of the constables of the Town of Hatfield in 
said County, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to meet in 
Memorial Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 20th 
day of February next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then 
and there to take action under Article 1, and to meet at 
seven o'clock in the evening to take action on all other 
articles : 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for 
the ensuing year: One Selectman for three years; one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years; one 
member of the School Committee for three years; one 
member of the Board of Water Commissioners for three 
years; one member of the Library Trustees for three 
years; Elector under the Will of Oliver Smith for one 
year; one member of the Planning Board for five years; 
one member of the Planning Board for four years; one 
member of the Sewer Commission for three years; and 
four members of the Hatfield Housing Authority. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'cock in the forenoon 
and kept open until eight o*clock in the evening. 



11 



Article 2. To hear and discuss all reports or sub- 
jects which have to do with the welfare of the town, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 3. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial years, beginning January 1, 1967 
and January 1, 1968 in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with the provisions of Section 17, 
Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $132.07 received from the Dog Fund to the 
Library Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to appropri- 
ate the sum of $587.50 from the State Aid for Libraries 
Account to the Library Account, or anything thereon. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer such sums of money as shall 
be deemed necessary to defray the current expenses and 
charges of the financial year, including debt and interest ; 
set the salaries for all elected officials in accordance with 
the provisions of Section 108, Chapter 41 of the General 
Laws; and provide for a reserve fund; or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer the sum of $6,332.99 as allocated 
by the actuary and certified by the County Commissioners 
to the Town of Hatfield under the provisions of Chapter 
32, General Laws, as amended, and pay said amount to 
the Treasurer-Custodian of the Hampshire County Re- 
tirement System. 

12 



Article 8. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to cooperate with the County and State 
under the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, the town's 
share, for improvement of Chapter 90 highways, and to 
appropriate the sum of $2,000.00, the State and County 
share, in anticipation of reimbursement from the State 
and County ; the town's share to be raised by taxation and 
the State and County share to be taken from Surplus 
Revenue and returned to same when reimbursement is re- 
ceived, or act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to cooperate with the State under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 81, General Laws, and to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $8,500.00, the town's share, and to 
appropriate the sum of $14,025.00, the State's share, in 
anticipation of reimbursement from the State, the town's 
share to be raised by taxation and the State's share to be 
taken from Surplus Revenue and returned to same when 
reimbursement is received, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to cooperate with the State and County 
under the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $4,550.00, the town's 
share for new construction on School and King Streets, 
and to appropriate the sum of $13,650.00, the State and 
County share, in anticipation of reimbursement from the 
State and County, the town's share to be raised by taxa- 
tion and the State and County share to be taken from sur- 
plus revenue and returned to same when reimbursement 
is received, and to transfer the sum of $5,415.78 from the 
1966 Chapter 90 monies for new construction on School, 
Chestnut, and King Streets to new construction on School 
and King Streets, or act anything thereon. 



ia 



Article 11. To see if the town will vote to appropri- 
ate from monies allotted under Chapter 679, Acts of 1965, 
the sum of $4,180.58 for new construction on School and 
King Streets, or act anything thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to appropri- 
ate from the Machinery Earnings Account the sum of 
$800.00 for the purchase of a snow plow for the Highway 
Department, or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 to continue construction 
of the sidewalk on the old sidewalk bed which runs on the 
easterly side of North Street approximately 1,000 feet 
in a northwesterly direction, or act anything thereon. 
(By petition) 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer the sum of $1,000.00 to elec- 
trify the town clock, or act anything thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to place 
street lights in the following locations : 

At the residence of Charles Zononi on Pantry 

Road, North Hatfield, pole #17, 
At the residence of Joseph Zalinski, Raymond 

Avenue, pole #1, 
At the residence of Peter Kotch, Elm Street, 

pole #26, 
On West Street, West Hatfield, between the 

homes of Anna Mullins and Dorothy Engle- 

hardt, pole #82, 
On Primrose Path between the homes of Eggles- 

ton and Levine, pole #9, 
On Pleasant View Drive, poles #4 and #8, 
On Bridge Street, poles #26, #32, #35, and #38, 
On Depot Road, North Hatfield, at the residence 

of Frederick Warren, pole #2/61, 
or act anything thereon. 

14 



Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer under the provisions of Sec- 
tion 64, Chapter 44, General Laws, sum for unpaid bills 
of previous years as follows : 

School Department — $5,866.37 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer the sum of $2,300.00 for new 
lighting in the auditorium of the Town Hall, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer the sum of $250.00 to join the 
Lower Pioneer Valley Regional Planning Commission, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to appropri- 
ate the sum of $38,000.00 for the construction of a twelve- 
inch water main from a point commencing at the Donnis 
Saw Mill on Linseed Road and thence running in an east- 
erly direction along Linseed Road and across Routes 5 & 
10 to Bridge Street and thence continuing along Bridge 
Street across the U. S. 91 to the intersection of Bridge 
Street and Dwight Street and thence turning and running 
in a southerly direction along Dwight Street to the north- 
erly side of Elm Street, the terminal point being the inter- 
section of Dwight Street with Elm Street, and to deter- 
mine whether to meet this appropriation the sum of 
$38,000.00 be appropriated by transfer of funds from the 
Water Available Surplus Account or other available funds 
in the Town Treasury, by taxation, by borrowing under 
the provisions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws as 
amended, or by a combination of any or all of these meth- 
ods, or take any action relative thereto. 



15 



Article 20. To see if the town will vote to hear the 
report of the Planning Board of the Town of Hatfield on 
the proposed amendment to the Zoning By-Laws of the 
Town of Hatfield and the Zoning Map of the Town of Hat- 
field which proposed amendment is set forth in Article 21 
in this warrant. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to amend 
Section II-B of the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Hat- 
field and the Zoning Map of the Town of Hatfield incor- 
porated thereby entitled "Hatfield, Mass. Zoning Map May 
1961 Revised May 2, 1962" by changing to an industrial 
zone those two tracts of land now zoned partly agricultur- 
al-residential and partly residential A more particularly 
bounded and described as follows : 

Tract 1 : A tract of land lying on the easterly side 
of Route 5-Route 10 in the Town of Hatfield, Massa- 
chusetts, belonging to William H. Burke, Jr. and 
Peter S. Rogaleski bounded and described as follows : 
On the North by land now or formerly of Frank 
Betsold and Raymond Betsold and land now or for- 
merly of George Zapka et ux ; on the east by land now 
or formerly of the Boston and Maine Railroad Com- 
pany ; on the south by land now or formerly of Leon- 
ard Vollinger and land now or formerly of Yarrows; 
and on the west by U. S. Routes 5 and 10 and land 
now or formerly of Quigg & Quigg, Inc. Being those 
premises described in deed of Frank J. Betsold and 
Raymond J. Betsold to Peter S. Rogaleski and Wil- 
liam H. Burke, Jr. recorded in the Hampshire Coun- 
ty Registry of Deeds in Book 1406, Page 263 and 
shown as Parcel 1 and Parcel 2 on a plan of land en- 
titled "Land in West Hatfield, Mass. Belonging to 
Frank J, & Raymond J. Betsold, April 23, 1963 — 
Scale 1" = 100' Aimer Huntley, Jr. & Associates, 30 
Crafts Ave., Northampton," recorded in the Hamp- 
shire County Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 63, Page 
77. Interstate Route 91 runs through this tract. 

16 



Tract 2: That tractof land, belonging to Leonard 
H. and Irene N. Vollinger, lying south of Tract 1 de- 
scribed above and contiguous to it, more particularly 
bounded and described as follows : 

Northerly by land now or formerly of Peter S. 
Rogaleski and William H. Burke, Jr., easterly by land 
now or formerly of William H. Burke, Jr. and Peter 
S. Rogaleski and the Connecticut River Railroad Com- 
pany ; southerly by land now or formerly of the heirs 
of Peter Saffer; and westerly by West Street (Route 
5 and 10) in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts. 

Being the very same premises described as the 
second tract in deed of the First National Bank of 
Northampton to Leonard H. and Irene N. Vollinger 
dated November 15, 1932, and recorded in the Hamp- 
shire County Registry of Deeds in Book 884, Page 72. 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote subject to 
the approval of the County Commissioners for the discon- 
tinuance of that extension of Prospect Street in the Town 
running in the rear of the American Legion Home Prop- 
erty from Elm Street east to the northerly boundary line 
of the American Legion Property, or take an action there- 
on. (By petition) 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,000 for leasing of a part or of an 
entire building for not more than four years for the pur- 
pose of providing suitable headquarters for veterans' or- 
ganizations specified in Chapter 40, Section 9, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to raise or 
appropriate the sum of $1,000 to be used towards the sup- 
port and maintenance of organized Veterans Quarters or 
housing, or act anything thereon. (By petition) 

17 



Article 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for improving the lighting 
conditions in the center of town, or take any action rela- 
tive thereto. 



Article 26. To see if the town will vote to install 
larger wattage on five street lights located in the center 
of town to improve lighting and therefore to increase the 
safety, or take any action thereon. (By petition) 



Article 27. To see if the town will vote to name or 
rename the following streets, or take any action relative 
thereto : 

1. Circle Drive from Plain Road to Chestnut Street. 

2. Elm Court from Elm Street to the Northampton 
line. 

3. Linseed Hill from Linseed Road to the North- 
ampton line. 

4. Church Avenue from West Street to Route 91. 

5. Mountain Drive from West Street to Pantry 
Road. 

6. Kugler Terrace from Main Street to the Dead 
End. 



Article 28. To see if the town will vote to repeal 
Section 2 of Article II of the Town By-Laws which reads 
as follows: 

No person shall place or cause to be placed 
any waste, refuse, boxes or other matter in 
any street or commit any nuisance thereon. 



18 



Article 29. To see if the town will vote to adopt the 
following by-law, or take any action relative thereto : 
Town By-Law Regulating the Dumping of 
Refuse, Rubbish, etc. 

1. No person shall place or cause to be placed any 
waste, refuse, or rubbish of any kind or descrip- 
tion in any street or public place in the town ex- 
cept in receptacles provided by the town for said 
purpose; except within the fenced area of the 
town Dump ; or except at such times as the Board 
of Selectmen may request that any or all of the 
aforementioned articles be so deposited for re- 
moval by it or others as part of a rubbish remov- 
al program. 

2. Any person violating this by-law shall be liable 
to a penalty of not less than twenty nor more 
than fifty Dollars for each and every offense. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to amend 
Article 1, Section 6 of the By-Laws by the Town of Hat- 
field which reads as follows : 

There shall be a finance committee consisting of three 
members to be appointed by the moderator. The members 
shall hold office for three years and their terms of office 
shall be so arranged that the term of one member shall 
expire at the end of each year, the terms of each member 
to expire at the final adjournment of the third annual 
town meeting following their appointment. After the final 
adjournment of each annual town meeting the moderator 
shall appoint as many members to said committee as are 
necessary to replace members whose terms expired at 
such final adjournment. The moderator shall fill by ap- 
pointment any vacancy in the membership of the com- 
mittee. 

to read : 

19 



There shall be a finance committee consisting of five 
members to be appointed by the moderator. The members 
shall hold office for three years and their terms of office 
shall expire at the final adjournment of the third annual 
town meeting following their appointment except that the 
terms of the two members appointed initially to increase 
the committee from three to five shall be so arranged that 
the term of one member shall expire in one year at the 
final adjournment of the first annual town meeting fol- 
lowing his appointment and the term of the other member 
shall expire in two years at the final adjournment of the 
second annual town meeting following his appointment 
and thereafter the terms of these members shall expire 
at the final adjournment of the third annual town meet- 
ing following their appointment. After the final adjourn- 
ment of each annual town meeting the moderator shall 
appoint as many members to said committee as are neces- 
sary to replace members whose terms expired at such 
final adjournment. The moderator shall fill by appoint- 
ment any vacancy in the membership of the committee. 

This amendment shall not become effective until the 
adjournment of the 1968 annual meeting. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to increase 
the number of the members of the School Committee from 
three to five so that the terms of the two initial added 
members to be elected would be so arranged that at the 
next annual town meeting the town would vote to elect 
one of the members to the School Committee for a term of 
one year and the other member to the School Committee 
for a term of two years and thereafter for terms of three 
years or take any action relative thereto. Said change if 
voted not to take effect until the next annual town meet- 
ing. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by post- 
ing attested copies thereof in five public places in the 
Town of Hatfield, seven days before time of said meeting. 

20 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time 
and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 8th day of February in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
sixty-seven. 



GEORGE W. ROGALEWSKI, Chm. 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
FRANK J. GODEK 

Selectmen of Hatfield 



21 






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26 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Hatfield : 

We respectfully submit our annual report for the 
year 1966. 

Through the generosity of the annual town meeting 
of 1966, we were enabled to take a big step forward in 
providing superior services for the protection of persons 
and property during the past year. Our new police cruiser- 
ambulance, under the direction of our capable police chief 
and his assistants, has already rendered services to the 
townspeople far above any monetary consideration. The 
new fire truck proved its worth just a few days after its 
arrival, when, in the good hands of our firefighters, it con- 
tributed to the saving of a home thought beyond the point 
of salvation by first arrivals at the scene of the fire. The 
worth of these two fine pieces of equipment has been im- 
measurably enhanced by the two-way radio-communica- 
tions system. 

Road repair, maintenance and reconstruction, as in 
the past, has progressed in a satisfactory manner with 
conservative expenditure. Chestnut Street work, under 
Chapter 90 new construction, has been completed, making 
for a safer and more comely thoroughfare. Future recon- 
struction will be done on School and King Streets. 

Street lighting is being expanded every year by vote 
of the town meeting. Good lighting is becoming a must in 
all areas of the town. 

Two special town meetings were held during the past 
year. The highlight of the August 30th meeting was the 
appropriation of $2,000.00 for the continuation of the en- 
gineering work relative to the development of a surface 

27 



water supply on the southerly branch of Running Gutter 
Brook. At the November 30th meeting a long step forward 
was taken by the town in re-zoning the area on the west 
side of Dwight Street to industrial to accommodate an in- 
dustry wishing to locate here. 

The location of a retail outlet for a major co-op on 
West Street further signals interest in Hatfield as a com- 
munity acceptable for both commercial and industrial en- 
terprises providing the sites and the zoning conform. 
Growth in population and homes alone will not broaden 
the town's tax base sufficiently to ease the unavoidable 
high costs of school, sewer and water expansion. 

In addition to filling posts and committee member- 
ships caused either by resignation, removal or failure to 
elect, we have, this past year, named a Parks and Recrea- 
tion Committee and have appointed the members elected 
to the Housing Authority at the 1966 annual town meet- 
ing in order to make the organization of this group legal. 

Once again we urge all to make note of the town's 
300th Anniversary which will occur in 1970 and to that 
end make ready any object which will add to some phase 
of this occasion. An Anniversary Committee has been 
named by the moderator as per town meeting instruction 
and contact should be made with it relative to any anni- 
versary matters. 

We express our sincere thanks to all officers, boards 
and departments for their co-operation in making it 
easier, more pleasurable and fruitful in carrying out the 
wishes of the townspeople as their elected administrative 
agents for town affairs for the year 1966. 

GEORGE W. ROGALEWSKI, Chm. 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
FRANK J. GODEK 

Board of Selectmen 



28 



List of Jurors 



Blyda, Joseph A., Jr. 
Deane, Michael T. 
Duga, Anna A. 
Englehardt, Marion 
Fortsch, John J. 
Garstka, John J. 
Gore, Eva 
Gore, Raymond 
Hart, Jovita D. 
Jones, Leroy 
Rabat, Helen R. 
Kabat, Loretta L. 
Thaddeus Kabat 
Kuzontkoski, Phillis A. 
Lizek, Ida M. 
Maciorowski, Jessie A. 
Maksimoski, Leon C. 
Malinowski, Anthony E. 
Michajluk, Elizabeth J. 
Mieleszko, Sophie 
Osley, Mildred Z. 
Pickunka, Walter A. 
Polhemus, Nancy 
Riley, Daniel F. 
Rogaleski, Gertrude B. 
Shea, John T. 
Staszko, Alexander 
Stefancik, Anne 
Strong, Irene A. 
Szych, Irene A. 
Vollinger, Doris 
Yagodzinski, Rosalie M. 
Ziezulewicz, Stanley E. 



Farmer 

Attendant 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Retired 

Retired 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Agronomist 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Attendant 

Tobacco Maint. Foreman 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Manufacturer 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 

Truck Driver 

Construction 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Food Handler 



29 



Treasurer's Report 



PETER S. ROGALESKI, Treasurer 

In Account with the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts 
Cash on Hand January 1, 1966 $181,633.89 



^ceipts for 1966: 




January- 


$ 24,643.36 


February 


37,582.53 


March 


24,318.36 


April 


47,139.36 


May 


25,163.91 


June 


44,014.16 


July 


11,712.30 


August 


33,466.40 


September 


87,520.10 


October 


90,181.10 


November 


176,025.29 


December 


110,776.66 



712,543.53 
$894,177.42 



30 



Payments per Warrants : 




January- 


$ 15,449.39 


February 


43,895.25 


March 


50,537.86 


April 


43,694.96 


May 


47,741.67 


June 


53,332.92 


July 


50,220.74 


August 


51,786.07 


September 


95,444.81 


October 


49,530.25 


November 


61,886.91 


December 


97,580.67 




661 101 50 


Cash on Hand December 31, 1966 


233,075.92 



$894,177.42 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Treasurer 



31 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE AND OTHER FUNDS 





Ceme- 


In- 


With- 


Bal- 




tery 


come 


drawn 


ance 


Hannah W. Smith 


C 


$ 21.64 $ 


! 12.88 $ 


323.91 


J. D. Brown 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Lewis S. Dyer 


C 


4.08 


4.08 


101.00 


Charles H. Waite 


NH 


5.54 


5.54 


137.49 


Charles M. Billings 


C 


10.10 


10.10 


250.00 


James Porter 


C 


4.40 


4.40 


109.51 


Fannie M. Burke 


C 


4.46 


4.46 


110.82 


Chas. S. Shattuck 


C 


4.44 


4.44 


110.63 


Seth W. Kingsley 


C 


4.40 


4.40 


109.45 


Reuben Belden 


B 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Theo Porter 


C 


4.28 


4.28 


106.18 


Charles L. Graves 


C 


4.28 


4.28 


106.22 


Augusta Beals 


C 


8.36 


8.36 


207.29 


B. M. Warner 


C 


8.36 


8.36 


207.42 


Henry Batcheller 


C 


4.08 


4.08 


101.26 


Reuben H. Belden 


B 


4.08 


4.08 


101.00 


Edwin H. Eldridge 


B 


8.08 


8.08 


200.67 


David Wells 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Otis Wells 


C 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Carrie L. Graves 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Harriet S. Marsh 


C 


8.24 


8.24 


204.35 


Clarence E. Belden 


B 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Alfred J. Bonneville 


C 


14.14 


14.14 


350.00 


Roswell Billings 


C 


10.10 


10.10 


250.00 


Houghton-Douglas 


WH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Susan Zima 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Samuel Osley 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Leon Harris 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Joseph Allen Vining 


C 


4.04 


4.04 


100.00 


Mabel M. Strong 


WH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Paul Vachula 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Edward S. Dickinson 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Luman Crafts 


NH 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Oliver Smith 


C 


8.08 


8.08 


200.00 


Daniel Omasta (new) 


C 


8.35 


8.35 


105.00 


Vernet H. Keller (new) 


C 


3.35 


3.35 


100.00 


Robert L. Belden 


B 


6.06 


6.06 


150.00 


Andrew Kukucka (new) 


NH 


3.33 


3.33 


200.00 


Edith Celatka (new) 


C 


.70 


.70 


70.00 


John Petrick (new) 


C 


.70 


.70 


70.00 



32 



Knight Lot (new) 


NH 


.... 


.... 


100.00 


Clifford L. Belden (new) 


B 


.... 


.... 


200.00 


E. S. Warner 


C 


7.77 


7.77 


204.53 


William Dougherty- 


C 


1.24 


1.24 


251.56 


Scott & Herman Harris 


B 


1.00 


1.00 


200.00 


Mary E. Hubbard 


C 


4.22 


4.22 


100.00 


Anthony Douglas 


C 


2.31 


2.31 


55.24 


Caleb & Edgar Dickinson 


C 


8.45 


8.45 


200.00 


E. C. Billings 


C&H 


25.83 


25.83 


620.27 


Hugh McLeod 


C 


4.25 


4.25 


102.92 


Lucius & Sterns Curtis 


C 


10.58 


10.58 


254.28 


H. W. Carl 


C 


4.25 


4.25 


102.73 


J. Franklin Knight 


C 


17.83 


17.83 


428.20 


Silas Hubbard & J. Hastings 


C 


11.64 


11.64 


279.57 


Levi Graves 


C 


6.62 


6.62 


159.00 


Jonathan Graves 


C 


8.50 


8.50 


204.12 


J. E. Porter 


C 


4.25 


4.25 


102.43 


Chester Hastings 


C 


4.29 


4.29 


103.14 


Frary-Gardner 


NH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.57 


Thaddeus & Solomon Graves 


C 


8.38 


8.38 


201.91 


Samuel Field 


B 


6.25 


6.25 


150.53 


Samuel Field 


B 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


Alpheus Cowles 


C 


4.46 


4.46 


107.18 


Daniel Allis 


C 


6.33 


6.33 


152.22 


P. M. Wells 


NH 


5.39 


5.39 


129.86 


Benj. Waite 


C 


3.76 


3.76 


90.91 


Joseph D. Billings 


C 


8.43 


8.42 


202.92 


Cooley Dickinson 


NH 


5.39 


5.39 


129.63 


Lemuel B. Field 


C 


4.54 


4.54 


109.18 


Roswell Hubbard 


C 


4.29 


4.29 


103.54 


Abby Dickinson 


C 


4.25 


4.25 


102.57 


Rufus H. Cowles 


C 


4.62 


4.62 


111.44 


Charles E. Hubbard 


C 


4.75 


4.75 


114.30 


Luman M. Moore 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.64 


Israel & Lucy Morton 


C 


13.37 


13.37 


321.39 


Elijah Bardwell 


C 


16.71 


16.71 


401.90 


Luther Wells 


NH 


14.17 


14.17 


340.48 


Oliver Warner 


C 


2.17 


2.17 


52.37 


John H. Sanderson 


C 


4.37 


4.37 


105.44 


Charles Smith 


C 


4.54 


4.54 


109.05 


J. H. Howard 


C 


4.46 


4.46 


107.48 


Conrad W. Wolfram 


NH 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Henry R. Holden 


NH 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Fannie Allis 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 



33 



Charles A. Byrne 


C 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


N. T. Abels 


WH 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Arthur C. Bardwell 


C 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


Fred Schepp 


C 


3.12 


3.12 


75.00 


Joseph Schepp 


C 


3.12 


3.12 


75.00 


General Care Fund 


H 


31.87 


31.87 


765.29 


John R. Sauergapf 


C 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


Lorenzo Cutter 


WH 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


Roswell G. Billings 


C 


10.42 


10.42 


250.00 


Charles Wight 


C 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


General Care Fund 


C 


.41 


.41 


10.00 


Stephen Omasta 


NH 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


G. Raymond Billings 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Frederick A. Pease 


C 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


Arthur Smith 


C 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


Curtis Waite 


WH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


Herman Harris 


B 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


Harold J. Morse 


C 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


John W. Darr 


NH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


Adam Englehardt 


NH 


10.42 


10.42 


250.00 


Connie Liebl 


WH 


7.28 


7.28 


175.00 


George Marsh 


B 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


R. M. Woods 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Arthur H odder 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


John Ondras & Geo. Fusek 


C 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


John Osley, Sr. 


WH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


Susie Yurik 


WH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


John Bucala 


WH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


George Strong 


WH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


Lilla Carl Ryan 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


H. W. Dickinson 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Martin Zapka 


WH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


Yura Fusek 


C 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


C. Mabel Barton 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


John Podmayer 


WH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


John Zapka 


WH 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


John A. Billings 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Reuben F. Wells 


C 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


Paul Holich 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Geo. C. & Geo. N. Pfeiffer 


NH 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


Arthur B. Harris 


B 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Martin Bucala 


C 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


Malcolm Crawford 


C 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Harry E. Kingsley 


C 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 



34 



Moses & Lewis Kingsley C 4.17 4.17 100.00 



Edith Wight Kuzmeski 


B 


8.34 


8.34 


200.00 


Paul Duga 


C 


4.17 


4.17 


100.00 


Raymond Donelson 


NH 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


Joseph A. Darr 


NH 


6.25 


6.25 


150.00 


George S. Belden 


B 


6.34 


6.34 


150.00 


Luther A. Belden 


B 


6.34 


6.34 


150.00 


Leland H. Wight 


B 


8.46 


8.46 


200.00 


Stephen Vachula 


NH 


4.23 


4.23 


100.00 


Lester Clark 


NH 


6.34 


6.34 


150.00 




$ 883.40 $ 


874.64 $ 22,145.99 


Hannah W. Smith 










(Custody State Treasurer) 






$ 


300.00 


Firemen's Relief Fund 




$ 4.40 


.... 


113.74 


Stabilization Fund 




3,060.33 


.... 


81,335.64 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Treasurer 



35 



Assessors' Report 



Value of Assessed Real Estate 


$ 14,522,350.00 


Value of Assessed Personal Property- 


979,550.00 


Total Value Personal & Real 


$ 15,501,900.00 


Number of Dwellings 


768 


Number of Acres 


9,060 


Town Appropriations 


$560,952.19 


State Audit 


332.09 


State Parks & Reservations 


1,968.40 


County Tax 


27,302.00 


County Hospital Assessment 


4,458.20 


Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 


257.40 


School Lunch & Library 


1,103.56 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Excise Tax 


$ 53,103.56 


Licenses 


6,000.00 


Interest on Taxes 


2,500.00 


All Other Estimated Receipts 


1,500.62 


Cherry Sheet Appendix 


111,822.00 


[Motor Coach & Parks 


200.00 


Total Estimated Receipts 


175,126.18 


36 





PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Church Property $304,850.00 

Town Property 955,050.00 

Smith Academy 63,000.00 

Cemeteries 103,000.00 

American Legion 17,000.00 

D.P.W. Office 475,000.00 

Water Supply System 90,000.00 

Schools 798,000.00 

Highway Department 150,000.00 



MITCHELL W. KEMPISTY, Chm. 
RICHARD BELDEN 
JOSEPH WILKES 

Board of Assessors 



37 



Town Clerk's Report 





VITAL STATISTICS 






1966 








Births 


Marriages 


Deaths 


Male 


17 


25 


18 


Females 


17 




8 


Total 


34 


25 


26 




Preceding Five Years 




1965 


43 


32 


31 


1965 


43 


29 


29 


1963 


43 


20 


31 


1962 


35 


17 


27 


1961 


57 


16 


26 



LICENSES 

Dog Fish & Game 

1966 227 386 

1965 208 416 

1964 192 414 

1963 190 379 

1962 157 334 

ELECTIONS 

Registered Voters, December 31, 1966 1,423 
Voted at Annual Town Meeting February 21, 1966 949 
Coted at State Primary September 13, 1966 

Democratic 261 

Republican 36 

Voted at State Election November 8, 1966 1,087 

Special Town Meetings in 1966 2 

PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



38 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
August 30, 1966 

ARTICLES AND VOTES UNDER SAME 



Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
priate and transfer from Surplus Revenue the sum of 
$1,000.00 to the Public Welfare Account, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 1. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $1,000.00 to the Public Welfare Account. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate and transfer from Surplus Revenue the sum of 
$3,000.00 to the Medical Assistance to the Aged Account, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 2. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $3,000.00 to the Medical Assistance to the 
Aged Account. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate a sum of money for the continuation of the engi- 
neering work relative to the development of a surface 
water supply in the southerly branch of Running Gutter 
Brook and determine whether the money should be ap- 
propriated from the Water Available Surplus Account or 
from other available funds, or take any action relative 
thereto. 



39 



Article 3. Voted that the Town appropriate the sum 
of $2,000.00 for the continuation of the engineering work 
relative to the development of a surface water supply on 
the southerly branch of Running Gutter Brook; and to 
meet this appropriation, the sum of $2,000.00 be trans- 
ferred from the Water Available Surplus Account, said 
fund to be added to funds previously appropriated for 
this purpose and to be expended under the supervision of 
the Board of Water Commissioners. 

Article 4. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the installation of water meters in the Town for 
use of the Water Commissioners in establishing water 
charges. 

Article 4. After adequate discussion pro and con, it 
was voted by those present and voting as opposed to the 
installation of water meters. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $300.00 for the 
Sewer Commission Expense Account, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 5. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $300.00 to the Sewer Commission Expense 
Account. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote in commemo- 
ration of those who have served in the military service of 
the Commonwealth in time of war to appropriate the sum 
of $1,000.00 from Surplus Revenue for the purpose of pro- 
viding suitable headquarters for such veterans' organiza- 
tions incorporated or chartered by the Congress of the 
United States as have been in operation for at least three 
years and for such other veterans' organizations listed 
under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 9, said sum 



40 



to be paid to American Legion Post 344 for use of a room 
or rooms in said American Legion headquarters for said 
purpose, or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 6. Voted in commemoration of those who 
have served in the military service of the Commonwealth 
in time of war to appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 from 
Surplus Revenue for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for such veterans' organizations incorporat- 
ed or chartered by the Congress of the Uniter States as 
have been in operation for at least three years and for 
such other veterans' organizations listed under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 40, Section 9, said sum to be paid to 
American Legion Post 344 for use of a room or rooms in 
said American Legion headquarters for said purpose. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $1,000.00 from Surplus Revenue for organized 
veterans' quarters for the American Legion Post 344, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 7. Voted to lay on the table. 

Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



41 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

November 30, 1966 

ARTICLES AND VOTES UNDER SAME 



Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to hear the 
report of the Planning Board of the Town of Hatfield on 
the proposed amendments to the Zoning By-Laws of the 
Town of Hatfield and the Zoning Map of the Town of Hat- 
field which proposed amendments are set forth in Article 
2 and Article 3 in this warrant. 

Article 1. Voted to hear the report of the Planning 
Board of the Town of Hatfield on the proposed amend- 
ments to the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Hatfield and 
the Zoning Map of the Town of Hatfield which proposed 
amendments are set forth in Article 2 and Article 3 in this 
warrant : 

REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

The Planning Board has held a public hearing and 
recommends the adoption of Articles 2 and 3 in this war- 
rant as follows : 

1. An amendment to Section II-B of the Zoning By- 
Laws of the Town of Hatfield and the Zoning Map of the 
Town of Hatfield incorporated thereby entitled "Hatfield, 
Mass. Zoning Map May 1961, Revised May 2, 1962" by 
changing from an agricultural-residential zone to an in- 
dustrial zone that trapezoidal tract now zoned agricultur- 
al-residential lying east of the Boston & Maine Railroad 
tracks; west of Dwight Street; north of Elm Street and 

42 



the ramp crossing U.S. 91; and south of Bridge Street 
bounded on the north approximately two hundred (200) 
feet by an industrial zone; on the east approximately 
twenty-two hundred (2,200) feet by a residence A zone 
located on the west of Dwight Street ; on the west approxi- 
mately two thousand (2,000) feet by the Boston & Maine 
Railroad tracks and an agricultural-residential zone; and 
on the south approximately twelve hundred (1,200) feet 
by a business A zone lying on the northerly side of Elm 
Street in said town. Said agricultural-residential area now 
comprises in part land known as the Thompson Lot be- 
longing now or formerly to Edmund Graves et al and in 
part land belonging now or formerly to Joseph and Ed- 
ward Osepowicz lying west of Dwight Street in the Town 
of Hatfield, Massachusetts. 

2. An addition to the Zoning By-Laws of the Town 
of Hatfield by inserting under Section V — General Regu- 
lations, a new section, Section V-D, the text of which is as 
follows : 

Section V-D. 

1. The following definitions shall apply in the inter- 
pretation and enforcement of this by-law: 

(a) "Person" shall mean any person, firm, part- 
nership, association, corporation, company or organi- 
zation of any kind. 

(b) "Vehicle" shall mean a machine propelled 
by power other than human power designed to travel 
along the ground by use of wheels, treads, runners or 
slides and transports persons or property or pulls 
machinery and shall include, without limitation, au- 
tomobile, truck, trailer, motorcycle, tractor, buggy 
and wagon. 

(c) "Property" shall mean any real property 
within the Town of Hatfield which is not a public or 
private way. 

43 



2. No persons shall abandon any vehicle on property 
within the Town of Hatfield and no person shall leave any 
vehicle on property within the Town of Hatfield for such 
time and under such circumstances as to cause such ve- 
hicle reasonably to appear to have been abandoned. 

3. No person in charge or control of any property 
within the Town whether as owner, tenant, occupant, les- 
see, or otherwise, shall allow any partially dismantled, 
wrecked, junked or discarded vehicle to remain on such 
property longer than seven-two (72) hours; and no per- 
son shall leave any such vehicle on any property within 
the Town for a longer time than seventy-two (72) hours ; 
except that this By-Law shall not apply with regard to a 
vehicle in an enclosed building; a vehicle on the premises 
of a business enterprise operated in a lawful place and 
manner when necessary to the operation of such business 
enterprise; or a vehicle in a storage place or depository 
maintained for said purposes in a lawful place and man- 
ner in the Town of Hatfield. 



PLANNING BOARD OF THE 
TOWN OF HATFIELD 

Francis H. Hebert, Chm. 
Henry F. Szych 
John S. Besko 

Voted to accept the report of the Planning Board. 
Unanimous vote. 



Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 
44 



. Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
Section II-E of the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Hat- 
field and the Zoning Map of the Town of Hatfield incor- 
porated thereby entitled "Hatfield, Mass. Zoning Map 
1961 Revised May 2, 1962" by changing from an agricul- 
tural-residential zone to an industrial zone on the Zoning 
Map of the Town of Hatfield that trapezoidal tract now 
zoned agricultural-residential lying east of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad tracks; west of Dwight Street; north of 
Elm Street and the ramp crossing U.S. 91; and south of 
Bridge Street bounded on the north approximately two 
hundred (200) feet by an industrial zone; on the east ap- 
proximately twenty-two hundred (2,200) feet by a Resi- 
dence A zone located on the west side of Dwight Street; 
on the west approximately two thousand (2,000) feet by 
the Boston & Maine Railroad tracks and an agricultural- 
residential zone; and on the south approximately twelve 
hundred (1,200) feet by a Business A zone lying on the 
northerly side of Elm Street in said town or take any 
action relative thereto. 



Article 2. AMENDMENT OF THE ZONING BY- 
LAWS AND THE ZONING MAP OF THE TOWN OF 
HATFIELD. 

Voted to amend Section II-E of the Zoning By-Laws 
of the Town of Hatfield and the Zoning Map of the Town 
of Hatfield incorporated thereby entitled ' 'Hatfield, Mass. 
Zoning Map May 1961 Revised May 2, 1962" by changing 
from an agricultural-residential zone to an industrial zone 
on the Zoning Map of the Town of Hatfield that trapezoid- 
al tract now zoned agricultural-residential lying east of 
the Boston & Maine Railroad tracks; west of Dwight 
Street; north of Elm Street and the ramp crossing U.S. 
91 ; and south of Bridge Street bounded on the north ap- 
proximately two hundred (200) feet by an industrial zone; 
on the east approximately twenty-two hundred (2,200) 

45 



feet by a Residence A zone located on the west side of 
Dwight Street; on the west approximately two thousand 
(2,000) feet by the Boston & Maine Railroad tracks and 
an agricultural-residential zone; and on the south ap- 
proximately twelve hundred (1,200) feet by a Business A 
zone lying on the northerly side of Elm Street in said 
town. Unanimous vote 74-0. 



Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Clerk 



Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Hatfield by adding to 
Section V — General Regulations, a new section, Section 
V-D, to read as follows: 

Section V-D. 

1. The following definitions shall apply in the inter- 
pretation and enforcement of Section V-D of this by-law: 

(a) "Person" shall mean any person, firm, part- 
nership, association, corporation, company or organi- 
zation of any kind. 

(b) "Vehicle" shall mean a machine propelled 
by power other than human power designed to travel 
along the ground by use of wheels, treads, runners or 
slides and transports persons or property or pulls 
machinery and shall include, without limitation, au- 
tomobile, truck, trailer, motorcycle, tractor, buggy 
and wagon. 

(c) "Property" shall mean any real property 
within the Town of Hatfield which is not a public or 
private way. 

46 



2. No persons shall abandon any vehicle on property 
within the Town of Hatfield and no person shall leave any 
vehicle on property within the Town of Hatfield for such 
time and under such circumstances as to cause such ve- 
hicle reasonably to appear to have been abandoned. 

3. No person in charge or control of any property 
within the Town, whether as owner, tenant, occupant, les- 
see, or otherwise, shall allow any partially dismantled, 
wrecked, junked or discarded vehicle to remain on such 
property longer than seventy-two (72) hours; and no per- 
son shall leave any such vehicle on any property within 
the Town for a longer time than seventy- two (72) hours; 
except that this By-Law shall not apply with regard to a 
vehicle in an enclosed building; a vehicle on the premises 
of a business enterprise operated in a lawful place and 
manner when necessary to the operation of such business 
enterprise; or a vehicle in a storage place or depository 
maintained for said purpose in a lawful place and manner 
in the Town of Hatfield. 

Article 3. AMENDMENT OF THE ZONING BY- 
LAWS OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD BY ADDING TO 
SECTION V — GENERAL REGULATIONS, A NEW 
SECTION, SECTION V-D. 

Voted to amend the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of 
Hatfield by adding to Section V — General Regulations, a 
new section, Section V-D, to read as follows : 

Section V-D. 

1. The following definitions shall apply in the inter- 
pretation and enforcement of Section V-D of this by-law : 

(a) "Person" shall mean any person, firm, part- 
nership, association, corporation, company or organi- 
zation of any kind. 

47 



(b) "Vehicle" shall mean a machine propelled 
by power other than human power designed to travel 
along the ground by use of wheels, treads, runners or 
slides and transports persons or property or pulls 
machinery and shall include, without limitation, au- 
tomobile, truck, trailer, motorcycle, tractor, buggy 
and wagon. 

(c) "Property" shall mean any real property 
within the Town of Hatfield which is not a public or 
private way. 

2. No persons shall abandon any vehicle on property 
within the Town of Hatfield and no person shall leave any 
vehicle on property within the Town of Hatfield for such 
time and under such circumstances as to cause such ve- 
hicle reasonably to appear to have been abandoned. 

3. No person in charge or control of any property 
within the Town, whether as owner, tenant, occupant, les- 
see, or otherwise, shall allow any partially dismantled, 
wrecked, junked or discarded vehicle to remain on such 
property longer than seventy- two (72) hours; and no per- 
son shall leave any such vehicle on any property within 
the Town for a longer time than seventy- two (72) hours ; 
except that this By-Law shall not apply with regard to a 
vehicle in an enclosed building; a vehicle on the premises 
of a business enterprise operated in a lawful place and 
manner when necessary to the operation of such business 
enterprise; or a vehicle in a storage place or depository 
maintained for said purpose in a lawful place and manner 
in the Town of Hatfield. Unanimous vote 69-0. 



Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Clerk 
48 



Visiting Nurse Association 



Number of visits 384 

Fees collected $276.00 

Mileage 1,319 

Visits to welfare patients 87 

Classification of visits : 

Medical 326 

Child Welfare 48 

Communicable Disease 7 

Tuberculosis Contacts 5 

Well Child Clinic — May 17 & 19 
76 children 

Dr. Fredericka Smith, Pediatrician 
Mrs. A. Cory Bardwell, Nutritionist 

3 Booster clinics in spring for Diptheria, Tetanus & 
Whooping Cough: 

2 Children received Series of 3. 
95 Children received Booster. 

Smith Academy Home Economics students assisted 
with weighing and measuring. 

MRS. LUCILLE GODEK, R.N. 



49 



Once again we wish to express our sincere apprecia- 
tion to Dr. Robert C. Byrne, Dr. Alfred J. Kaiser, many of 
our local nurses and townspeople, who have donated their 
services to various clinics throughout the year. For this 
we are most grateful. 

Our town has not been certified by the Medicare Pro- 
gram as yet. However, the committee has met with Miss 
Marion Wray, public health nursing administrator for the 
Massachusetts Public Health Department, to discuss pos- 
sibilities of meeting state requirements for this program. 
More research is planned in order that we may cope with 
this situation as the need becomes more apparent. 

Criteria which must be met in order that any nurs- 
ing agency be accredited by the Mass. State Public Health 
Dept. : 

a. The primary function of the agency must be 
skilled nursing and other therapeutic nursing. 

b. There must be written policies in regard to job 
program, patient care, and personnel. 

c. Standardized record keeping. 

d. Cost accounting according to a standardized pro- 
cedure. 

e. Nursing supervision by a fully qualified public 
nurse. 



MRS. WILLIAM PODMAYER, R.N. 

President 

MRS. WILLIAM SHEEHAN, R.N. 

Vice-Preisdent 



50 



HATFIELD VISITING NURSE 
EXPENSES AND RECEIPTS FOR 1966 

Balance as of January 1, 1966 $ 337.96 

Receipts : 



From Visiting Nurse 


276.00 




From Town of Hatfield 


2,400.00 




State Withholding 


1.38 




Total Receipts for 1966 


$ 


3,015.34 


Expenses : 






Nurse's Salary- 


$2,400.00 




Mileage 


118.71 




Social Security- 


95.00 




Clerk 


25.00 




Printing Checks 


4.88 




Total Expenses for 1966 


:$ 


2,643.59 


Balance as of January 1, 1967 


$ 


371.75 



51 



Report of the Fire Department 



To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

I wish to submit my third annual report of the Fire 
Department. 

I would like to express my and the whole fire de- 
partment's deepest sympathy to the wife and family of 
Lt. Walter Pickunka who lost his life in the line of duty. 
Also missed for his many years of service to the fire de- 
partment is Arthur Brassord, who passed away this year. 

I would like to thank all the firefighters for their 
splendid turnout at all the fires and for the cooperation. 

The Two-way Radios were installed and are in very 
good working order. 

The new 1967 Ford Fire Truck was delivered on Jan- 
uary 4, 1967. The new truck is at the Main St. station 
and the Seagrave is in Bradstreet. 

A new 1500-watt generator was bought for the de- 
partment. 

During the past year the fire trucks were called out 
45 times, which are as follows : 

Gas leak in house 1 

Chicken Coop 1 

Furnace 1 



52 



Car 


1 


House Fires 


4 


Telephone Pole 


1 


Grass Fires 


19 


Tobacco Sheds 


5 


Dump 


5 


Wash Gas off road 


1 


Cheese Cloth 


4 


Chimney Fire 


1 


Oil Burner 


1 



45 

There were 147 outdoor burning permits and 10 Oil 
Burner permits issued in 1966. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MYRON J. SIKORSKI 

Fire Chief 



53 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

During the past year, pruning and trimming was 
done in the most hazardous areas of King St., North St., 
Chestnut St., School St., Main St., Maple St., Elm St., 
Pantry Rd., Dwight St., Mountain Rd., Straits Rd., South 
St., and Prospect St. 

Forty-one young maple trees were planted and ferti- 
lized as replacements and in new sites. 

All roadside trees were sprayed with D.D.T. and 
Methoxychlor. 

Twenty-eight stumps were removed, loamed over and 
seeded. 

Three trees infected with Dutch Elm disease were 
taken down and burned. 

Thirty-six other trees were taken down: hazardous, 
wind damage, wood decay or for new road construction. 

Tree Removals were as follows: 
Main St., 1 Maple, 10 Elms 
Elm St., 2 Elms 
Maple St., 1 Elm 
Prospect St., 1 Maple, 1 Pine 



54 



Little Neponsett, 1 Elm 

Bashin Rd., 3 Elms 

Bradstreet, Depot Rd., 1 Elm 

Straits Rd., 1 Cherry, 2 Pines, 2 Oaks 

King St., 1 Pine, 1 Oak 

Mountain Rd., 1 Pine 

Removed by Highway Dept., for new road construc- 
tion: 

Chestnut St., 1 Oak, Sycamore, 2 Elms, 2 Pop- 
lars and 2 Spruce 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCIS E. GODIN 

Tree Warden 



55 



Library Report 



To the Trustees of the Public Library 
and to the Citizens of Hatfield : 

I herewith submit this seventh annual report as 
Librarian of Hatfield: 

The library report for the year ending December 31, 
1966 shows a circulation of 36,559 books and periodicals. 

The circulation was as follows : 

Juvenile fiction 16,252 

Juvenile non-fiction 7,004 

Adult fiction 8,735 

Adult non-fiction 4,568 

Studying our circulation figures we can clearly see 
that the children use our library most extensively. 

We borrowed a total of 2,050 books from the book- 
mobile and 354 books from interlibrary loan. We can bor- 
row any book not found on our shelves, even those of an- 
other language. 

During the year 691 books were added to the library. 
Some of the townspeople donated books to the library 
which were deeply appreciated. Columbia Records sent us 
a gift package of a number of long-playing Masterworks 
records. These records can be borrowed at any time. 

56 



We are very grateful to the Hatfield Book Club for 
their continued interest in the libary. Another summer 
reading program was sponsored by them this year. This 
year it was the Aerospace Reading Club with over seventy 
children participating. Pins and certificates were given 
out at the close of the club. Mrs. Marianna Rowe showed 
a film and refreshments were made and served by Mrs. 
Doris Vollinger, a staff member, and myself. 

With the co-operation of the teachers we had another 
poster and essay contest this year. Prizes were given to 
the student who had the best poster and essay. 

The Book Club, Women's Endeavor and Polish Wom- 
en's Club met at the library for a combined evening meet- 
ing. Mr. Taplan, of the Western Regional Library Sys- 
tem, explained the interlibrary loan system. 

Mrs. Marianna Rowe, of the Regional Library Sys- 
tem, showed two hour long films during the Thanksgiv- 
ing and Christmas vacations. Mrs. Helen Osley, a member 
of the library staff, told a story during the school year. 

We would like to thank one of our patrons who gave 
a gift of plastic covers for our books. These covers not 
only improve the appearance of the books but save in cover 
replacement, book replacement and book rebinding. 

Because of an increase in our story tellers we had 
stories every Tuesday morning during the summer. We 
are very grateful to our story tellers who were, Mrs. 
Marianna Rowe, Mrs. Rita Prew, Mrs. Alice Johnson, Mrs. 
Anne Tierney, and college students Gail Fitzgerald and 
Peggy Wilkes. 

During the year the trustees approved the purchase 
of two storm windows, which completed the coverage of 

57 



all windows. The cellar was painted, five new chairs were 
bought, the top of a desk was covered with formica, and 
a table was refinished. 

My sincerest appreciation is extended to Mrs. Helen 
Osley, Mrs. Doris Vollinger, the Trustees, and the teachers 
for their co-operation and assistance during the past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. CANTWELL 

Librarian 



58 



Police Report 



I respectfully submit the report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1966. Also the 
number of arrests in the Town of Hatfield : 

Assault and Battery 3 

Operating under the influence 
Operating as to endanger 
Leaving the scene of accident 
Operating without license 
Failing to stop for police officer 
Motor vehicles equipment tags 3 

Registry action 4 

Speeding 5 

Drunkenness 2 

Returned to State Institutions 1 

Accidents investigated 21 

Warrants served 3 

Summons served 64 

Ambulance service from June 15 - Dec. 31 26 
All committed dog taxes collected 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY J. SLIWOSKI 

Chief of Police 



59 



Report of Water Commissioners 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

The Water Department installed fifteen new services 
to new homes and installed seven renewals to present 
homes which were not copper in 1966. 

Also installed were six new hydrants which replaced 
old ones which were not functioning properly. 

At the present time, the firm of Tighe and Bond, Con- 
sulting Engineers, is taking test borings at a new reser- 
voir site to see if the site will be feasible. The Water De- 
partment does not have a report as yet on these tests. 
When the report is received, the town will be informed 
of its contents. 

The Water Department wishes to thank the towns- 
people for their co-operation during the past year and 
wish for their co-operation in the future. 



Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH F. VOLLINGER, Chm. 
RUPERT HARUBIN, Sec. 
JOHN RUDY 

Water Commissioners 



60 



School Building Committee Report 



At the last annual town meeting, under Article 24, it 
was voted to empower the School Building Committee to 
draw preliminary plans and cost estimates for the con- 
struction of a high school on property designated as the 
Blauvelt property and such adjacent property as needed. 

The firm of Caola and Bieniek Associates, Inc., archi- 
tects and engineers of Springfield, Massachusetts, were 
hired to draw preliminary plans; Gordon E. Ainsworth 
and Associates, land surveyors, engineers and landscape 
architects, were hired to prepare a property plan, and 
topography plans. 

On May 5, 1966, the School Building Committee ap- 
proved schematic drawings of the proposed new high 
school and together with property plans, topography 
maps, educational specifications and projected enrollment 
data, forwarded the same to the Massachusetts School 
Building Assistance Commission in Boston, Massachu- 
setts. 

On May 18, 1966, a conference with the Massachu- 
setts School Building Assistance Commission was held in 
Boston, Massachusetts. At that time the School Building 
Committee was informed that the School Building Assist- 
ance Commission no longer had the final say in approv- 
ing school construction projects. We were informed that 
our school problem would be forwarded to the newly ap- 
pointed Board of Education (under the adoption of the 
Will's Committee report by the State Legislature) for dis- 
cussion and approval. 

61 



On July 15, 1966, after several telephone calls and 
letters, we received the following information: "Because 
of staff shortages and the confusion inherent in the re- 
organization of the Department of Education, we have 
not had a chance to discuss Hatfield's problem with the 
decision makers. We hope that some of the confusion will 
clear up soon, so that we can react intelligently and con- 
structively. Meanwhile please be patient a little longer. ,, 

The months of August and September were more of 
the same confusion and inaction on the part of the Board 
of Education. 

During October, 1966, the Massachusetts School 
Building Assistance Commission informed the School 
Building Committee to contact Mr. Holland Duval, a re- 
gional coordinator of the Pittsfield branch of the Depart- 
ment of Education, for a meeting to discuss our school 
problems. On October 31, 1966, we met with Mr. Duval 
at the High School. The School Building Committee in- 
formed Mr. Duval of all that had transpired from 1963 
to date, also he was given all the necessary materials such 
as Educational Specifications, proposed drawings, proper- 
ty plans, topography maps and an extensive tour of all 
our school buildings, site and our community building 
projects, in preparation for the November meeting of the 
Board of Education in Boston, Mass. 

In December, 1966, the School Building Committee 
was required to get a formal decision on the possibility of 
joining the Frontier Regional system. 

The Frontier Regional Committee denied our request 
to join that system or send tuition students there. 

A complete resume of Hatfield's school problem and 
urgency of the matter were sent to Mr. Thomas J. Curtin, 

62 



Deputy Commissioner of Education, Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, requesting action in resolving our school 
problem at the December 20, 1966, Board of Education 
meeting. 

"Result — no decision." 

The School Building Committee has met with Sena- 
tor John D. Barrus on the school problem. Senator Bar- 
rus has great interest in school matters and has pledged 
to assist Hatfield in every way possible to resolve Hat- 
field's school needs. 

It is the Building Committee's desire that the "deci- 
sion makers" will act to resolve the school issue in the 
best interest of education and welfare of the community. 



Respectfully submitted, 

THADDEUS RABAT, Chm. 
JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI, Sec. 
RICHARD BELDEN 
MRS. ETHEL BYRNE 
WILLIAM H. BURKE, JR. 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
WILLIAM S. OLSZEWSKI 
JOSEPH V. PORADA, JR. 
EUGENE PROULX 
RAYMOND RUSSELL 
STANLEY SLIWOSKI 



School Building Committee 



63 



Hatfield Youth League 



The Hatfield Youth League has completed its seventh 
successful year of operation, namely, in two activities, 
baseball and basketball. 

In April, the annual registration for baseball was held 
and approximately seventy-five reported and signed up to 
play. The players were screened and the varsity team 
selected first and represented Hatfield in the Frontier 
Youth League. The remaining players were divided into 
four teams and played intramural games for two rounds 
or six weeks. 

The Hatfield varsity team again participated with 
five other towns in the Frontier Youth League, namely, 
Conway, Old Deerfield, South Deerfield, Sunderland and 
Whately. The team was runner-up in both halves of league 
play and was awarded that trophy at the league banquet. 
Since Hatfield organized and entered in the league in 1960, 
it has been under the tutelage of James Mullins, Sr. and 
the past four seasons has been assisted by Kenneth Balise. 
The seven-year record of the team now stands at three 
championships, three as runner-up and once in fourth 
place. 

All players from the five local teams were treated to 
a trip at a Pittsfield Red Sox game and the varsity at a 
Boston Red Sox game. All players were also treated to a 
picnic at the Center School diamond and chaperoned by 
officers and coaches. 

64 



For the first time, as far as it is known, a teen-league 
team was formed in Hatfield under the Youth League 
sponsorship and entered into the newly organized area 
Pioneer Teen League which consisted of teams from Had- 
ley, North Hadley and Southampton. This team was 
coached by Americo "Zip" Zerneri and in its first season 
of play, won the Teen League championship. This team 
was also honored at a dinner. 

With the arrival of the winter season, basketball reg- 
istration was held with approximately seventy-five youths 
registering. This is the largest number ever to sign up 
for basketball. The players were again divided into two 
groups, namely, Grades 3 through 5 and Grades 6 through 
8. Because of the larger number registering in the lower 
group, two more teams were added in that group. 

Last March, at the Small School Tournament in Am- 
herst, an exhibition game was put on between halves of 
one of the games by a Youth League All Star team and 
they were complimented for their performance. 

We wish to repeat our annual appeal that in order for 
these activities to be continued successfully, coaches and 
helpers in both sports are always needed. We would also 
like to thank all those who have assisted in the past. 

We would also like to express our deep gratitude to 
all groups and individuals for their help and support in 
the past and look forward to their continued help and sup- 
port in the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY P. BETSOLD, Pres. 
BERNARD J. KOSIOR, Vice Pres. 
THOMAS P. MULLINS, Sec.-Treas. 
JAMES M. MULLINS, SR. 
KENNETH R. BALISE 



65 



Planning Board Report 



The year 1966 was certainly a busy and productive 
period for the members of the Planning Board. 

Fifteen regular and special meetings were held dur- 
ing the year and the majority of the efforts of the Plan- 
ning Board were directed to the classification and finaliz- 
ing of three important projects, two of them considered 
historical events for the growth of the town. The high- 
lights of the year are: (1) The Highway Dept., under the 
supervision of Joseph Deres, numbered all established 
buildings and possible building lots and the Planning 
Board had the material put into book form. Distribution 
was made to all town departments and other concerns 
where a book of this nature would prove valuable. It is 
believed that this is the first time street numbers for the 
town are systematic and published accordingly. The Plan- 
ning Beard allowed the senior class to canvass the town 
and sell house numbers to residents with proceeds going 
to the class treasury; (2) A new industry will be located 
in town and this is expected to be beneficial in many ways. 
Multicolor Corporated has purchased land off Dwight 
Street and building is expected to take place in the Spring 
of 1967; (3) Several new streets have appeared because 
of changes that took place, and these are to appear before 
the voters for approval at the annual town meeting on 
February 20, 1967. 

It is anticipated that during the next year the effort 
of the Planning Board will be directed to the investigation 
and improvement toward additional town needs. 

66 



The Planning Board meets on the first Tuesday of 
every month and welcomes the townspeople to attend 
these meetings. 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCIS H. HEBERT, Chairman 
JOHN BESKO 
WILLIAM H. BURKE, JR. 
STANLEY SLIWOSKI 
HENRY SZYCH 



67 



Sewer Commissioners' Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

The Sewer Commission was organized in March, 1966, 
with Richard Drury, Chairman, John Betsold, Vice-chair- 
man and Francis Hebert, Treasurer. 

The supplement to the 1960 Sewerage Report was re- 
viewed and sent to the State Department of Public Health 
for their review and approval. This was subsequently re- 
ceived. The consulting engineers for this phase of the 
work, Tighe and Bond, were then ordered to proceed with 
the survey of the tract of land suitable for the proposed 
treatment site. 

The solution recommended by the consultants and 
approved by the State Department of Public Health is 
the Lagoon System whereby 85-90% of all the sewage 
load is consumed by bacteria in open ponds at a remote 
location off South Street outside the dike. 

This system has several advantages over the other 
systems possible in this town : 

1. Will handle 85-90% of all waste material as 
against 35-38% for mechanical systems. 

2. Requires little machinery. 

3. Requires no full-time operator or major service 
contract. 

4. Uses relatively little electricity. 

68 



5. Can serve the town even if expansion is greater 
than planned. 

6. Will meet the requirements for both "primary" 
and "secondary" treatment. While we must have primary 
treatment today as ordered by the State Department of 
Public Health, it is expected that federal pressure will 
force us to do secondary treatment within ten years. This 
system solves this problem now without additional ex- 
pense later. 

7. The cost of this system is less than the others 
when the salary of maintenance personnel and service 
contracts for the next ten years is considered. 

The Commission is preparing letters to the owners 
of the land under consideration to see if they are willing 
to sell and at what price. 

The next step is to obtain a public hearing before the 
State Department of Public Health as to the acceptance 
of the site for the purpose of sewerage treatment. 

When all this is complete, an article will be brought 
to Town Meeting for funds to purchase the land. 

According to present legislation, the town should re- 
ceive up to 74% of the cost of its sewer improvements and 
treatment plant in state and federal aid after the town 
has its site bought and paid for. 



Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD W. DRURY 

Chairman 

69 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1966 



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76 



Report of Town Accountant 



GEN 

Taxes : 

Personal 1966 

Real 1966 

Trailer 1966 

Poll Previous Years 

Person Previous Years 

Real Previous Years 


RECEIPTS 

ERAL REVEN 

husetts : 


UE 

$ 19,974.35 

269,752.10 

756.00 

14.00 

2,447.33 

41,331.34 

<pOO/l OI7K 10 


Motor Vehicle Excise: 
Levy of 1966 
Previous Years 


$ 48,497.32 
15,305.25 


63,802.57 

567.50 
1,650.00 

74,359.95 

6,244.25 
155.00 


Farm Animal Excise: 
Levy of 1966 
Previous Years 


$ 417.50 
150.00 


Sewer Tax 

Commonwealth of Massac] 
Income Tax 
Corporation 
Meal Tax 
Chap. 70 G. L. 
State Sales Tax 


$ 13,250.00 

5,975.62 

823.04 

19,264.76 

35,046.53 


Licenses and Permits: 
Liquor 
Milk 
All Other 


$ 5^00.00 

3.50 

440.75 


Court Fines 





77 



RECEIPTS 



Grants from Federal Government: 




Old Age Assistance 


$ 3,029.01 


Aid to Dependent Children 


1,417.76 


Medical Assistance for Aged 


7,500.11 


Medical Assistance 


2,568.09 


Disability Assistance 


582.76 


Public Law #874 


8,090.00 


Public Law #864 


1,113.63 


Public Law #89-10 


9,990.00 


Public Law #88-210 


774.00 


School Lunch 


8,772.77 



43,838.13 



Grants from Commonwealth: 

Free Public Library $ 587.50 

Vocational Education — Outside 



Transportation 


3,159.68 




Transportation of Pupils 


7,586.00 




Highway Chap. 649 Sec. 5 


8,361.16 




Highway Chap 81 


12,070.25 


31,764.59 






Grants from Hampshire County: 






Dog Licenses 




256.54 


Dog Disposal 


$ 


68.00 


Total General Government 


556,981.65 


COMMERCIAL GOVERNMENT 




Board of Appeals 


$ 


40.00 


Outlays 




88.20 


Sewer Connections 




100.00 


Highways : 






Highway Chap. 90 Maint. — State 


$ 1,000.00 




Highway Chap. 90 Maint. — County 


1,000.00 




Machinery Fund 


5,354.99 




Highway Chap. 90 New Const. — State 


9,500.00 




Highway Chap.90 New Const. — County 


4,750.00 




Individuals — Damages 


208.75 


91 aia i± 



78 



RECEIPTS 

Public Welfare: 

General Relief — State 
Aid to Dependent Children — State 
Old Age Assistance — State 
Disability Asisstance — State 
Medical Assistance for Aged — State 
Medical Assistance — State 


$ 


1,090.87 
1,368.74 

565.66 

11,491.76 

6,151.75 

861.29 


21,530.07 
3,083.34 

25,312.68 
113.84 

24,406.16 

6,654.55 

45.32 

259.95 

188.50 

3,381.36 
883.40 


Veterans' Benefits 

Schools : 

Athletic Receipts 
School Lunch Collections 
Sale of School Bus 
Rent — Migrant Educ. 
Tuition 


$ 


1,797.38 

23,238.00 

100.00 

77.30 

100.00 


Library Fines 

Water Department: 
Rates 
New Services and Misc. 


$ 

$ 

/ESI 
$ 


23,250.00 
1,156.16 


School Construction — Chap. 645 

Acts of '48 
Compensation — State Withholding Tax 
Recovery Veterans' Benefits 
Care of Cemetery Lots 

General Interest: 
Interest on Taxes 
Charges and Fees 
Interest on Motor Vehicle Excise 


2,565.75 

2.95 

812.66 


Interest on Trust Funds 


$ 

?MENT 

467.25 
845.00 


Total Commercial Revenue 

AGENCY, TRUST AND IOT 

Dog Licenses Due County 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 


107,901.11 



79 



RECEIPTS 



Federal Withholding Tax 


31,549.70 


State Withholding Tax 


3,727.58 


Retirement 


4,140.76 


Blue Cross 


6,343.09 


Teachers' Health & Accident 


517.64 




47 501 0° 






Refunds 


69.75 


Cash on Hand January 1, 1966 


181,633.89 


TOTAL 


$894,177.42 



80 



PAYMENTS 

Moderator $ 25.00 

Selectmen : 

Salaries 1,500.00 

Clerk 300.00 

Expenses: 

Printing, Postage, Stationery $ 93.55 

Dues 41.00 

Travel 7.50 

All Other 17.50 

159.55 



2,875.00 



Accountant : 




Salary 




Expenses : 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


$ 164.95 


Dues 


5.00 


Treasurer : 




Salary 




Expenses: 




Clerical 


$ 260.00 


Printing, Postage, Stationery 


153.36 


Bond 


165.00 


Travel 


87.20 


Dues 


4.00 



Collector : 




Salary 




Expenses : 




Clerical 


$ 507.50 


Printing, Postage, Stationery 


287.31 


Bond 


328.00 


Dues 


4.00 


Travel 


58.24 



169.95 



3,175.00 



669.56 
Purchase Check Protector 309.00 



2,000.00 



1,185.05 



81 



PAYMENTS 



Assessors: 
Salaries 




2,600.00 


Expenses: 






Clerical 


$ 200.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


66.80 




Travel 


37.00 




Dues 


15.00 




Equipment 


82.50 




All Other 


88.25 


489.55 
1,200.00 


Town Counsel 




Elector Under Oliver Smith Will 




10.00 


Planning Board Expense 




164.86 


Town Clerk: 






Salary- 




3,075.00 


Expenses: 






Recording Fees 


$ 118.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery- 


47.48 




Bond 


10.00 




Dues 


10.00 




Travel 


103.20 




Clerical 


255.00 





Election and Registration: 

Registrars $ 156.00 

Election Officers 673.00 

Clerical 205.00 

Printing, Postage, Stationery 69.98 

Street Lists 701.00 



Town Hall: 

Janitor's Salary $ 3,250.00 

Fuel 1,472.41 

Lights 1,126.48 

Janitor's Supplies 306.97 

Repairs 2,546.21 

Special Hall License 25.00 



543.68 



1,804.98 



8,727.07 



Total General Government $ 30,983.25 

82 





PAYMENTS 






PUBLIC SAFETY 






Police Department: 








Chief: 








Salary- 


$3,000.00 






Gas, Tire Allowance 


174.90 








$ 


3,174.90 




Men 




745.54 




Insurance 




345.14 




Misc. Supplies 




388.55 




Grease, Oil and Gas 




238.36 




All Other 




65.09 








$ 


4,957.58 


Purchase Combination Cru 


iser & Ambulance 




3,254.10 


Total Police 


$ 


8,211.68 


Fire Department: 








Chief 


$ 


400.00 




Clerk 




100.00 




Men 




990.00 




Hose 




346.01 




New Equipment 




651.90 




Gas 




64.65 




Truck Repairs 




147.82 




Fuel 




166.23 




Lights 




55.50 




Rents 




325.00 




Telephone 




365.52 




All Other 




30.78 








$ 


3,643.41 


Purchase New Fire Truck 


— Partial Payment 




6,500.00 



Purchase 2-way Radio — Police, Fire & 

Highway Departments 4,962.00 

Gas Inspector : 

Salary $ 200.00 

Expense 13.00 



213.00 

Moth Work 2,599.60 

Tree Work 2,698.38 

Civil Defense 273.28 



Total Public Safety $ 29,101.35 

83 



PAYMENTS 






HEALTH AND SANITATION 




Public Health 


$ 47.68 




Visiting Nurse 


2,400.00 




Well-Child Clinic 


160.00 




Insp. Children — Tuberculosis 


30.00 




Insp. Children — Immunization 


131.32 




Insp. Animals and Slaughter 


275.00 




Sewer Comm. Expense 


184.10 


3,228.10 






HIGHWAYS 






Highway General: 






Wages 


$ 1,717.80 




Telephone 


171.50 




Fuel 


119.88 




Lights 


48.12 




Rent of Dump 


350.00 




Misc. Equipment & Supplies 


522.27 




Sewer Work — Salaries 


801.00 




Sewer Supplies 


203.87 




Snow Removal — Salaries 


3,931.56 




Snow Removal — Sidewalks 


558.00 




Snow Removal — Sand 


76.00 






$ 


8,500.00 


Fence Repairs 




198.60 


Dike Repairs 




198.90 


Bridge Repairs 




190.80 


Street Lights 




5,558.08 


Purchase Road Line Marker 




642.87 


Purchase Water Pump 




395.00 


Highway Chap. 81 : 






Labor 


$ 13,898.79 




Machinery 


2,594.99 




Cold Patch 


2,165.70 




Gravel, etc. 


921.16 




Asphalt 


1,152.95 




Winter Sand & Salt 


1,092.00 


21.825.59 



84 





PAYMENTS 








Highway Chap. 90 Maintenance: 








Labor 




$ 


837.00 




Machinery 






94.50 




Bituminous Concrete 






1,745.50 




Paint 






323.00 


3,000.00 








Highway Chap. 90 New Const.: 








Labor 




$ 10,471.20 




Machinery 






2,687.00 




Other Machinery 






1,203.00 




Bituminous Concrete 






7,532.29 




Loam, etc. 






1,611.17 




Gravel 






1,762.10 




Pipe 






1,357.38 




All Other 






719.16 


27,343.30 








Machinery Operating: 










Parts and Repairs 




$ 


2,198.71 




Gas 






1,565.60 




Oil and Grease 






116.90 




Welding Outfit & Gas 






115.93 


3,997.14 




$ 


Total Highways 


71,850.28 



CHARITIES AND VETERANS' BENEFITS 

$ 3,615.00 



Public Welfare: 




Salary of Agent 


< 


General Relief: 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


$ 68.75 


Dues 


10.00 


Travel 


89.76 


Groceries 


354.86 


Medicine & Medical Attention 


2,167.86 


Cash Aid 


96.00 


All Other 


15.95 



2303 .18 



85 



PAYMENTS 



Aid to Dependent Children 






670.47 


Disability Assistance 






1,595.45 


Medical Assistance for Aged 






14,623.22 


Medical Assistance 






4,406.63 


Old Age Assistance 




$ 


5,026.68 


Total Charities 


32,740.63 


VETERANS' BENEFITS 






Salary of Agent 


$ 


400.00 




Postage 




20.00 




Dues 




5.00 




Aid 




2,410.13 




Medical 




22.50 


2,857.63 






SCHOOLS 








General Administration: 








Superintendent's Salary 


$ 


4,099.92 




Clerk 




2,194.80 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 




374.39 




Telephone 




549.00 




Travel 




609.30 




Census 




85.00 




Dues 




445.80 




All Other 




60.95 


8,419.16 






Teachers' Salaries : 








High Principal 


$ 


6,582.32 




High 




48,490.54 




Junior High 




47,277.72 




Elementary Principal 




9,002.00 




Elementary 




74,868.20 




Music 




2,998.56 




Handicapped Children 




64.53 




Penmanship 




500.00 


189,783.87 








Text and Reference Books: 








High 


$ 


1,663.51 




Junior High 




1,387.66 




Elementary 




1,372.96 










4,424.13 



86 



PAYMENTS 

Supplies: 

High $ 1,754.57 

Junior High 918.36 

Elementary 2,949.75 

Physical Education 1,158.20 

Driver Education 625.87 



Transportation : 
High 

Elementary 
Athletic 


$ 


2,710.25 
8,130.75 
1,008.07 


11,849.07 








Janitors' Services: 
High 

Junior High 
Elementary 


$ 


4,000.00 
4,400.00 
5,000.00 


13,400.00 








Fuel and Light: 
High 

Junior High 
Elementary 


$ 


1,618.95 
1,727.18 
4,884.71 


8,230.84 








Maintenance of Buildings & Grounds : 
High — Janitor's Supplies 
Junior High — Janitor's Supplies 
Elementary — Janitor's Supplies 
Junior High Repairs 
Elementary Repairs 
School Street Bldg. Repairs 


$ 


346.70 

657.84 

1,649.28 

5,327.91 

1,048.08 

31.59 


Q 061 A(\ 



New Equipment 1,177.49 

Equipment Repairs 244.05 

Gas — School Vehicles 106.17 

Repairs — School Vehicles 145.80 

Graduation 243.98 

Nurse 2,700.00 

Nurse — Travel Expense 27.25 



87 



PAYMENTS 






Health Supplies 




61.17 


Insurance 


$5 


454.87 


Total Paid from Town Appropriation 


257,736.00 


School Committee Expense 




247.37 


Public Law #864 




1,918.80 


Public Law #874 




1,903.27 


Public Law #88-210 (Smith-Hughes) 




774.00 


Public Law #89-10 (ESEA) 




6,391.46 


Athletic Fund 




2,134.67 


School Physician 




550.00 


Vocational Tuition 




11,315.10 


Vocational Transportation 




1,505.00 


School Building Comm. Expense 




19.80 


Prepare Preliminary Plans and Cost Estimate — 






New High School 


$$ 


1,098.65 


Total Schools 


J85,594.12 


SCHOOL LUNCH 






Clerk $ 


960.00 




Wages 


9,874.99 




Food 


20,456.60 




Misc. Supplies 


838.42 




Equipment 


354.88 




Equipment Repairs 


89.54 




Fuel 


57.50 




Bond 


25.00 




Janitor Service 


75.00 




Food Delivery 


205.00 




All Other 


18.90 






$ OO OCR QO 




«P 


UM,«SVU.VIS 


LIBRARY 






Librarian $ 


1,800.00 




Asst. Librarians 


1,709.50 




Janitor Services 


311.00 




Books 


2,250.29 




Periodicals 


108.95 




Binding Books 


15.00 




Fuel and Lights 


411.22 




Repairs 


713.19 




Misc. Supplies & Equipment 


275.18 




Stationery & Postage 


25.95 






$ 


7,620.28 



88 



PAYMENTS 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Memorial Day $ 504.59 



Telephone 


336.88 




Care of Town Clock 


75.00 




Print & Deliver Town Reports 


943.00 




Unclassified 


37.70 




Outlays 


84.20 




Bind Town Records 


22.25 




Youth League 


600.00 




Board of Appeals Expense 


59.52 




Dog Disposal 


136.00 




Finance Comm. Expense 


69.16 




Sanatorium Assessment 


4,458.20 




Retirement Assessment 


5,124.73 




New Bldg. — Amer. Legion Headquarters 


1,000.00 






* 10 At:- 




«P 


j-u,-xvj..mv 


INSURANCE 






Town Schedule $ 


4,183.00 




Auto — Liability, Prop. Damage, Comp. 


1,898.66 




Monies and Securities 


75.00 




Volunteer Firemen 


181.57 




Workmen's Compensation 


2,519.30 




Public Liability 


941.00 




Boiler Insurance 


626.00 


1ft AOA KQ 




v j-vrm^.vtj 


WATER DEPARTMENT 






Water Comm. Salaries 


$ 


900.00 


Collector's Salary $ 


819.35 




Clerical 


200.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


116.50 




Labor 


2,104.25 




Pipe, Fittings, Etc. 


2,362.84 




Truck Repairs and Gas 


463.68 




Fuel and Light 


687.95 




Chlorine 


314.00 




Care of Chlorinator 


600.00 




All Other 


74.85 






$ 


7,743.42 


Straits Road Extension 




762.56 



total Water Department % 9,405.98 

89 



PAYMENTS 




CEMETERIES 




Clerk 


$ 75.00 


Labor 


995.00 


Postage & Stationery 


19.80 


Repairs to Monument Foundations 


1,000.00 


Survey Hill Cemetery 


300.00 


All Other 


59.41 
$ 


INTEREST 


Water Loan 


$ 140.00 


School Building Loans 


10,500.00 

$ 

DNESS 


MUNICIPAL INDEBTE] 


School Loans 


$ 20,000.00 


Water Loan 


4,000.00 

$ 


REFUNDS 


Taxes 


$ 3,771.87 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


1,965.76 


0. A. A. — Commonwealth 


4,635.65 


All Other 


158.46 

$ 

ESTMENT 


AGENCY, TRUST AND INV 


Assessment for M. V. Excise Bills 


$ 257.40 


State Parks & Reservation Tax 


2,396.67 


State Audit 


332.09 


County Tax 


26,728.29 


Teachers' Health & Accident 


480.56 


Dog Licenses for County 


467.25 


Cemetery Perpetual Care — New 


845.00 


Cemetery Perpetual Care — Interest 


8.76 


Federal Withholding 


31,549.70 


Retirement 


4,134.51 


State Withholding 


3,727.58 


Blue Cross 


11,068.70 


Insurance 


1,270.83 

$ 



2,449.21 



10,640.00 



24,000.00 



10,531.74 



83,267.34 

Total Payments $661,101.50 

Cash on Hand January 1, 1967 233,075.92 



TOTAL $894,177.42 

90 



Director of Accounts Report 



September 6, 1966 



To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. George W. Rogalewski, Chairman 

Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the period from 
March 1, 1964 to December 27, 1965, made in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is 
in the form of a report made to me by Mr. William 
Schwartz, Assistant Chief of Bureau. 



Very truly yours, 

ARTHUR H. MacKINNON 
Director of Accounts 



91 



Mr. Arthur H. MacKinnon 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Boston, Massachusetts 



Sir: 



As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the period from 
March 1, 1964, the date of the previous examination, to 
December 27, 1965, and report thereon as follows : 

The financial transactions, as recorded on the books 
of the several departments receiving or disbursing town 
funds or committing bills for collection, were examined, 
checked, and verified by comparison with the records in 
the offices of the town treasurer and the town accountant. 

The books and accounts in the office of the town ac- 
countant were examined and checked. The general and 
appropriation ledger accounts were analyzed and proved. 

The recorded receipts were compared with the treasurer's 
books and with the records in the several departments 
collecting money for the town, while the payments were 
checked with the treasurer's books and with the treasury 
warrants. The appropriations were checked with the 
town clerk's records of financial votes passed by the town 
meetings, and the transfers from the reserve fund were 
compared with the authorizations of the finance commit- 
tee. 

The necessary adjustments resulting from the audit 
were made, and a balance sheet, which is appended to this 
report, was prepared showing the financial condition of 
the town on December 27, 1965. 

92 



The surety bonds of the several town officials re- 
quired by law to furnish them for the faithful perform- 
ance of their duties were examined and found to be in 
proper form. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were 
examined and checked. The cash book additions were 
verified, and the receipts as recorded were compared with 
the accountant's books, with the records of the several 
departments collecting money for the town, and with 
other sources from which money was paid into the town 
treasury. The recorded payments were checked with the 
treasury warrants authorizing the treasurer to disburse 
town funds and with the town accountant's records. 

The cash balance on December 27, 1965 was proved 
by reconciliation of the bank balances with statements 
furnished by the banks of deposit and by actual count of 
the cash in the office. 

Considerable detailed checking was necessary to bal- 
ance the treasurer's cash, which added materially to the 
time consumed in making the audit. 

The savings bank books representing the investment 
of the trust and investment funds in the custody of the 
town treasurer were examined and listed, the bequests 
and income were proved, and the withdrawals were com- 
pared with the treasurer's record of receipts. 

The records of payroll deductions for Federal and 
State taxes, the county retirement system, and group in- 
surance were examined. The deductions were listed, the 
payments to the proper agencies were verified, and the 
balances in the general treasury were proved with the re- 
spective controls in the accountant's ledger. 

93 



The payments on account of maturing debt and in- 
terest were compared with the amounts falling due dur- 
ing the period of the audit and were checked with the 
cancelled securities and coupons on file. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked. The accounts outstanding at the 
time of the previous examination, as well as all subse- 
quent commitments of taxes and excise, were audited and 
proved with the warrants committing them for collection. 
The recorded collections were checked, the payments to 
the treasurer were verified, the recorded abatements were 
compared with the records of the assessors, and the out- 
standing accounts were listed and proved with the ac- 
countant's ledger. The cash balance on December 27, 
1965 was proved by actual count of the cash in the office. 

It is again recommended that the tax collector take 
action to procure a complete settlement of the delinquent 
tax and excise accounts which date back to 1959. 

The records of departmental and water accounts re- 
ceivable were examined and checked. The commitments 
were verified, the recorded collections were proved with 
the payments to the treasurer, the abatements were com- 
pared with the departmental records, and the outstanding 
accounts were listed, checked with the available records 
in the several departments, and reconciled with the town 
accountant's ledger controls. The cash on hand in the 
water department on December 27, 1965 was proved by 
actual count. 

Verification of the outstanding tax excise, and water 
accounts was made by mailing notices to a number of per- 
sons whose names appeared on the books as owing money 
to the town, the replies received thereto indicating that 
the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

94 



The appropriations were listed from the town clerk's 
record of town meetings, and the amounts voted were 
compared with the aggregate appropriations raised by the 
assessors in the determination of the 1964 and 1965 tax 
rates. 

The receipts of the town clerk for dog and sporting 
licenses, as well as for gasoline renewals, were checked 
with the records of licenses and permits granted. The pay- 
ments to the town treasurer and to the Division of Fish- 
eries and Game were verified, and the cash on hand 
December 27, 1965 was proved by actual count. 

The records of receipts of the selectmen and the 
sealer of weights and measures, as well as of the police, 
highway, school, and library departments, and of all other 
departments collecting money for the town, were exam- 
ined and checked. The payments to the treasurer were 
checked with the treasurer's cash receipts and with the 
records of the town accountant, while the cash on hand in 
the several departments was verified by actual count. 

There are appended to this report, in addition to the 
balance sheet, tables showing reconciliations of the sev- 
eral cash accounts, summaries of the tax, excise, depart- 
mental, and water accounts, as well as schedules showing 
the transactions and condition of the trust and investment 
funds. 

Cooperation was received from all town officials dur- 
ing the progress of the audit, for which, on behalf of my 
assistants and for myself, I wish to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM SCHWARTZ 

Assistant Chief of Bureau 



95 





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100 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, J 966 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Stanley J. Sliwoski, Chairman Term Expires 1967 

Ethel I. Byrne, Secretary Term Expires 1969 

Henry F. Kulesza Term Expires 1968 

Regular school committee meetings are held 

at Elementary School 

on the second Tuesday of each month 

or at a time convenient to the members of 

the school committee. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John A. Skarzynski 
School Office : Home Address : 

High School Building King Street 

Telephone : 247-2361 Hatfield, Mass. 

WORK CERTIFICATES AND SCHOOL CLERK 

Marie P. Sheehan 

15 Chestnut Street 

Office telephone 247-2361 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Robert C. Byrne, M.D. 

46 Main Street 

Telephone 247-2661 

Alfred J. Kaiser, M.D. 

School Street 

Telephone 247-5751 

103 



SCHOOL NURSE 

Mrs. Lucille Godek, R.N. 

19 Prospect Street 

Telephone 247-2921 

CORPS OF TEACHERS 1966 - 1967 

Superintendent of Schools and Principal of 
Smith Academy 

John A. Skarzynski 
Driver Education 



Smith Academy 

John H. Naumowicz, Assistant Principal 
English II-A, IV-A, Humanities 

Florence E. Muller 
French II, III, IV ; Latin II ; Guidance 

Margaret E. Pruzynski 

Typing I, II; Shorthand I, II; 

Secretarial Practice 

Mary A. Spakowski 
Home Economics ; Biology ; Jr. Business Math 

Leonard A. Yarrows 
Algebra II ; Advanced Math ; Physics ; Chemistry 

Richard J. Sadoski 

Business Law ; Typing I ; Economics ; 

Business Training ; Bookkeeping 

Richard M. Cechvala 

English III- A, II-B, III-B, IV-B; Plane Geometry; 

Soccer Coach 

Maura J. Leary 
U. S. History; Civics; Problems of Democracy 



104 



Center School — Junior High 

Grades 7, 8, 9 
Dorothy Breor — Principal 

Jean Kempisty, Assistant Principal 
Grades 7, 8 : Social Studies, Music, Glee Club 

Maxwell Moczulewski — Grade 9 

Math; Algebra; Math Club; 

High School Basketball Coach 

Joseph F. Savage — Grade 8 

Reading; English; School Paper 

High School JV Basketball and Jr. High Baseball Coach 

Caroline Brazeau — Grade 9 

English; Conversational French; French I, II; 

French Club ; Girls' Basketball Coach 

Richard P. Rost — Grade 7 
Science; Art; Science Club 
Jr. High Basketball Coach 

James A. Devlin — Grade 8 

English ; Reading ; Latin ; Library Club 

Faculty Manager 

Frank E. Abarno 

World History ; General Science ; General Math ; Math 

Grades 7-9 — Jr. High Soccer Coach 

Elementary School 

Dorothy Breor — Principal 

Grade 6 
Frances Celatka Bernadette Pipczynski 

Grade 5 
Cynthia Tessier Virginia Klaes 

Grade 4 
Hilda Fortsch Patricia Klaes 



105 



Anne Tierney 


Grade 3 


Ann Labbee 


Eleanor Stenglein 


Grade 2 


Martha Boyle 


Helen Kostek 


Grade 1 

Ruth F. Myers 
Remedial Reading 


Lura Bieda 



Supervisors 

Music — Esther Norris 

Penmanship — William Rinehart Co. 

Physical Education — Clyde W. Meyerhoef er 

Custodians 

Elementary — Mitchell Kempisty 

Center School — Chester Celatka 

High School — John Besko 



Transporters 

John W. Maroney — Regular School Transportation 
Frank Skroski, Jr. — Vocational School Transportation 



School Lunch Workers 



Winifred Betsold, Manager 
Wanda Shea 
Bertha Kosakowski 
Mary Winters 



Hazel Roberts, Asst. Mgr. 

Mary Vachula 

Phyllis Kuzontkoski 

Helen Rudy 



106 



Report of the School Committee 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield : 

The year 1966 was another challenging year for the 
Hatfield school department. There were enrollment in- 
creases that caused increases in the school budget and 
therefore created even greater pressure on our physical 
plants. We have insufficient classrooms available to offer 
the programs which we must have to educate our young 
people for taking their place in today's world. Although 
we do not expect a large increase in our school population 
at any one time we do bring to your attention the fact 
that a gradual rise in numbers has taken place and will 
inevitably continue and that this can only cause a continu- 
ing erosion of our present program and tax even greater 
our present physical facilities. It has been, and still is, 
our considered opinion that the town undertake a build- 
ing program as soon as possible, especially on the senior 
high school level. It is nice to look back at an old school 
with nostalgia, but when we inspect them today with any 
honesty of vision, we know that they are a liability, both 
educationally and economically. 

We are maintaining a reasonably good salary sched- 
ule for our teachers, but we are also realistic enough to 
know that this is not the only incentive that teachers look 
for today and we must keep in mind that good teachers 
are attracted by good working conditions which consist of 
adequate and sufficient classrooms, lab space, library fa- 
cilities, other related facilities and the equipment that 
goes with them. 

107 



We, as a town, have an obligation to our young peo- 
ple to make available enough space and facilities for a 
modern education. At the present time our space and fa- 
cilities are inadequate for the program which should be 
offered and we urge you to get on with a building program 
for today's world. 

Recent Massachusetts legislation which will have pro- 
found effect on school systems is the new Collective Bar- 
gaining Act (Chap. 763 of the Acts of 1965). In essence, 
the law states that effective February 15, 1966, it is man- 
datory for school committees or their designated repre- 
sentative to bargain collectively with the designated rep- 
resentatives of school employees. These representatives 
shall meet at reasonable times, including meetings appro- 
priately related to the budget making process of employ- 
ment, or the negotiation of an agreement on any question 
arising thereunder and shall execute a written contract 
incorporating any agreement reached but neither party 
shall be compelled to agree to a proposal or to make a con- 
cession. If, after a reasonable period of negotiations over 
the terms of an agreement, a dispute exists between a 
municipal employer and an employee organization or if 
no agreement has been reached in 60 days prior to the 
final date for setting the budget, either party or the par- 
ties jointly may petition the State Board of Conciliation 
and Arbitration to initiate "fact finding". The law goes 
on to state that the cost of the fact finding proceedings 
under this section shall be divided equally between the 
employer and the employee organization. 

In reviewing the events which took place during the 
past 12 months, we find the school committee held 11 regu- 
lar meetings and 6 special meetings during the year. 

A complete list of school personnel can be found in 
another section of this report. In reviewing the teaching 
staff situation, we found several changes took place in the 
school system. 

108 



Mrs. Sara Reed Wright, resigned to teach in North- 
ampton, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Arthur Andrews, resigned to teach in West Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. 

Mr. John Leary, resigned to teach in Holyoke, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Mr. Richard Nadolny, resigned, entered business field. 

Miss B. Janet Livingston, resigned to teach in Boul- 
der, Colorado. 

Mrs. Ruth Myers, elected remedial reading teacher at 
Elementary School. 

Mr. Richard Rost, elected teacher in Center Junior 
High School. 

Mr. Frank Abarno, elected teacher in Center Junior 
High School. 

Mr. Richard Sadoski, elected teacher in Smith Acad- 
emy. 

Mr. Richard Cechvala, elected teacher in Smith Acad- 
emy. 

Miss Maura Leary, elected teacher in Smith Academy. 

The staff of the school department will naturally in- 
crease in proportion to the school enrollment. There are 
presently 28 full time teachers, 2 full time administrators, 
2 part time supervisors, and one full time specialist on the 
staff. Their sincere and dedicated service to our schools 
is greatly appreciated by the school committee. Also com- 
mended for their loyalty and service to our schools are 
the custodians, school lunch workers, school secretary, 
and health personnel. The relationship that exists be- 
tween the school committee, school administrators and 
school staff is excellent and essential if the Hatfield 
schools are to continue to provide a good education for the 
pupils of the town. 

109 



The school committee has spent many hours and has 
given careful study to the budget and believes its request 
is a minimum to operate the school system efficiently and 
successfully in 1967. The Hatfield Finance Committee and 
the School Committee have met and discussed the school 
budget. With the approval of the budget by both bodies, 
the school committee will make every effort to provide an 
adequate educational program. Your attention is directed 
to the financial section which also includes reimburse- 
ments to the town. 

During the year the school committee approved bids 
and made arrangements for public advertising for school 
bus routes, oil, and milk bids. Contracts this past year 
were awarded to the following concerns: the vocational 
school bus transportation to the Skroski Bus Company, 
the oil contract to the Norwood Oil Company for #4 and 
#2 fuel oil and the Brookside Dairy for the school lunch 
milk. The regular school transportation contract is held 
by the Maroney Bus Company and is effective through 
June, 1969. 

The school committee has endorsed and supported 
related educational programs for the youth of the town, 
including the Youth baseball and basketball programs, 
skating rink and sewing clubs. 

Besides the ordinary maintenance carried out during 
the year, the following maintenance and repair program 
was carried out. At the elementary school corrections 
were made in the heating system, shrubs were planted, 
the blacktop area was sealed, and a roof leak was repaired. 
At the junior high school new classroom and office lights 
were installed, Venetian blinds were cleaned, painting in- 
side the building was done, the roof was repaired and gut- 
ters were cleaned, water pipes were replaced, hardtop was 
sealed, the language lab was serviced, two tree stumps 

110 



were removed, and two new fire doors were installed. The 
basketball bleachers were also painted. The above has 
brought the schools up to their present excellent condi- 
tion and the school committee wishes to commend the cus- 
todial staff for its outstanding maintenance program dur- 
ing the year. 

The trustees of Smith Academy carried out necessary 
maintenance and repairs to the building. The roof was 
repaired and slate was replaced, the sewer system was 
overhauled, the gutters cleaned and repaired and metal 
protective plates were placed on the stairs. These repairs 
were taken care of without cost to the town. The Trus- 
tees have been very cooperative in maintaining the build- 
ing and certainly deserve a vote of appreciation. 

The Highway Department contributes much to mak- 
ing our roads and grounds usable. Rarely is it necessary 
to call upon them as they serve you and your school at 
the same time. It is hoped their record of service will 
continue. 

The following pieces of new equipment were added 
to the school system: four typewriters, rotary power 
mower, fan, bookcase, letter file, desks and chairs, lockers, 
and wall clocks. 

At the last annual town meeting the Hatfield School 
Building Committee was empowered to draw preliminary 
plans and prepare a complete cost estimate for the con- 
struction of a high school. The school committee urges 
every citizen to study their report and to support its ef- 
forts to solve the building problem at the earliest possible 
date and recommends positive and aggressive action to be 
taken to obtain new facilities on the secondary level. The 
enrollment projections contained in this report and a re- 
view of our physical plants emphasize the need of addi- 

111 



tional classroom space and a long range building program 
for the future. In the meantime, the school committee 
will make every effort to avoid possible double sessions. 

Through the school offices a great deal of work is 
done to have Hatfield qualify for federal funds. The school 
committee approved federally funded projects under Title 
I and II, 89-10, Vocational and Business Education Act, 
and NDEA Title III and V-A. The school department also 
participated in the Neighborhood Youth Corps program. 
Six youths did a variety of maintenance, repair work and 
general office work during the summer months. The sal- 
ary of the youths was paid by the Federal Government. 
The only cost to the school department was in supervision, 
guidance and maintenance of records. This program is 
also in effect for the school year 1966-67. 

The Hatfield School Committee is generally repre- 
sented at the area as well as the annual state and national 
meetings. 

The school committee wishes to publicly thank the 
following: the Parent-Teacher Council for their generous 
donations to the school system and Smith College, espe- 
cially Superintendent Paul D. Davis and Mr. Howard Grey 
of the Buildings and Grounds department, for their assist- 
ance and generous donations of general school equipment. 

The committee is pleased to acknowledge the interest 
of the following citizens and civic clubs in the education 
of our students. The following honors are awarded to de- 
serving members of the high school graduating class : 

American Legion Post Awards 

Hatfield Book Club Annual Literary Award 

Lions Club Award 

Woman's Endeavor Society Award 

112 



M. Larkin Proulx Award 

Woman's Club of the Holy Trinity Catholic Church 
Award 

Suzanne M. Novak Memorial Award 

The Parent-Teacher Council Awards 

Hatfield Teachers Club Awards 

Hatfield Junior Drum Corps Awards 

Patricia Zembiski Memorial Award 

Both the superintendent's and elementary- junior 
high principal's reports carry a more detailed account of 
the activities of the Hatfield Public Schools. These reports 
were read and approved by the school committee and your 
attention is called to them. 

In conclusion, the school committee wishes to express 
its thanks to members of the school department, town 
officers and departments, civic clubs and townspeople for 
their help and assistance in making the school year of 
1966 a profitable one and looks forward to their continued 
support and assistance. 



Respectfully submitted, 

STANLEY J. SLIWOSKI 
ETHEL I. BYRNE 
HENRY F. KULESZA 



113 



Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and the 
Citizens of Hatfield : 



I hereby submit my ninth annual report as Superin- 
tendent of Schools of Hatfield. 



Continuous growth has taken place in the Hatfield 
School System during the past fifteen years. This growth 
has naturally resulted in more school facilities, and larger 
staffs. This growth has also placed increased responsibili- 
ties, duties and demands upon the school system that were 
unrealized at that time. In spite of this, however, the 
school committee has continued its efforts to maintain a 
quality school system. They have established standards 
for the repair and maintenance of the school buildings as 
well as for the essentials in teaching skills and materials. 
The excellent cooperation of the school personnel has re- 
sulted in a fine education for our youth. 

The year 1966 has been a year of revolutionary 
change on the national, state and local levels of education. 
In Massachusetts, the Recommendations of the Willis 
Commission Report were changed into law. The impact 
of these new state educational laws upon our local school 
system will set the stage for even more spectacular 
changes in the near future. The Education Acts of 1965 
passed by the Federal Government also initiated programs 
in our local school system during the past year. 

114 



As evidenced by the news media, the role of the fed- 
eral government in public education has increased tremen- 
dously in the past two decades. This has probably hap- 
pened for two reasons. One is that our national interest 
requires improvement in the public educational systems 
and secondly that the local property tax is not sufficient 
to support today's demands for education. A great deal of 
the federal interest in education rests in the fact that 
what happens in education today reaches far beyond the 
local communities. Believing that all children should have 
equal educational opportunities regardless of where they 
might live or how much taxable wealth exists in the com- 
munity that provides their schooling, the federal govern- 
ment has entered the educational field. They are oper- 
ating on the belief that broad based support should sup- 
plement local funds. State funds should help equalize the 
differences among school systems in the state, and federal 
funds should do the same between states. To encourage 
communities to improve their educational offerings, the 
federal government has enacted legislation that will finan- 
cially tempt communities to spend more on education, be 
it on facilities, equipment, ideas, or curriculum. Some- 
times this temptation takes the form of matching funds 
(Federal Government pays 50% — local school system 
pays 50%) ; sometimes it is in the form of an outright 
grant (Federal Government pays 100% of the costs). The 
new federal legislation on education is the biggest, most 
irritating and yet potentially the most significant action 
most school administrators have had to administer. Much 
of the discomfort is caused by the volume of regulations, 
application forms to be completed, deadlines to be met, 
interpretations to be obtained, approvals to be awaited, 
and funds to be forwarded. The red tape, carbon copies, 
waiting, budgeting and wondering what is best for our 
school system and community, are all very frustrating. 
Despite these obstacles, we are pleased to report that the 
Hatfield Public Schools are conscientiously attempting to 



115 



do what is right for Hatfield. For example, long range 
plans for the improvement of instruction in five critical 
subjects have been approved under the revised Title III 
of the NDEA. These approved plans have enabled the 
town to purchase much needed instructional equipment 
on a matching basis. 

Funds have been made available to the Hatfield 
School System under the following programs : PL 89-10, 
Title I has brought approximately $10,000 allotted to Hat- 
field in recognition of special educational needs. Hatfield's 
approved program is in remedial reading at the elemen- 
tary level. This program is funded by an outright grant 
on an allotted basis. Title III of NDEA has broadened its 
scope to include many new subject areas. Hatfield is alot- 
ted matching funds annually of $1 per student plus special 
projects. Title V-A of NDEA covering the field of guid- 
ance and counselling has sent funds to Hatfield on a for- 
mula basis. PL 89-10, Title II has brought library and ref- 
erence books to the schools to strengthen the library fa- 
cilities at all grade levels. The purchases amounted to 
about $1,400 and were paid directly by the Division of 
Libraries in Boston, Massachusetts. The function of 
Title II is to provide materials that are easily accessible 
within the school building, which will serve to stimulate 
all phases of student reading, the curriculum, guide stu- 
dents toward developing skills in the selection and use of 
library materials and to contribute to the professional 
growth of the faculty. Books purchased with these funds 
have been in all areas. Funds also have been received un- 
der PL 874 which deals with employees on federal installa- 
tions. These funds have made it possible for the develop- 
ment of plans to provide the upgrading and broadening 
of the educational offerings of our system at little or no 
cost to the town. You can be assured that we will be cog- 
nizant of all financial assistance available from both the 
state and federal levels and that we will make every ef- 
fort to obtain the funds and use them effectively. 

116 



The maintenance of an adequate salary schedule for 
the entire personnel of the school department is essential 
if we are to attract and keep highly trained, conscientious 
and efficient teachers. Otherwise, the instructional phase 
of this department will be nothing but a proving ground 
for personnel that may find more monetary rewards in 
other systems. A turnover of teachers can only be termed 
as penny wise and pound foolish and will only affect our 
pupils. 

Since enrollment is the basis for all operations of the 
school department, it is pertinent that this report deal 
also with that subject. Enrollment charts follow this re- 
port and you are asked to refer to and study them thor- 
oughly. One cannot help but notice that the 10 year 
growth from 1956 — 414 students to 1966 — 638 students 
is approximately 54%. One can easily see why facilities 
are needed as soon as possible. A decision must be made 
concerning the educational program at the high school. 
At the present time, we are not offering or have a cur- 
tailed program in the following instructional areas in the 
high school due to lack of space: general classrooms, sci- 
ence laboratories, office practice training, practical and 
fine arts, physical education, musical program and art in- 
struction. Does the town desire a high school program 
which will include the following: a school library, suffi- 
cient space for a musical program which will include group 
instruction, elective courses and classes in theory and har- 
mony, physical education classes which would include a 
female instructor, elective art program, health room 
where students who are ill may properly receive care, ex- 
panded space for the commercial department, including a 
large size typing room, office practice room, and a com- 
bined shorthand-bookkeeping room, laboratory space for 
all sciences, teachers' area, guidance area and an adminis- 
trative area ? All these could be had with the construction 
of a new high school. The construction of a high school 
would also make available space for the possible addition 

117 



of a kindergarten. Questions have arisen from townspeo- 
ple on the possibility of double sessions. I am of the opin- 
ion that double sessions are only desirable when no other 
means are available. In making this decision, the advan- 
tages of such a plan should be considered in light of offer- 
ing a program which will give the students the best edu- 
cational training to prepare them for either the business 
world or attendance at schools of advanced learning. 

Some of the highlights that took place in our schools 
during the year are the remedial reading program, library 
program, business program, use of practice teachers, par- 
ticipation in " Schools Match Wits" television program, 
championship teams in basketball and soccer, and text- 
book revisions. Supplies and equipment were purchased 
as needed. Maintenance and repairs were made. Students 
in the high school took the following tests: CEEB, 
NMSQT, PSAT, IQ, and GATB. Other tests are given 
and supervised by the Guidance Department. Also, in 
order to keep pace with the trends in education, staff 
members have been in attendance at professional meet- 
ings, workshops and institutes. 

The school department wishes to bring to your at- 
tention the reimbursements that are received by the town 
on account of education. The 1967 budget has increased 
and the reasons for the increases, other than normal ex- 
penditures, are: rise in enrollment, new bus contracts, 
comparable salary schedules, and normal inflation. Your 
attention is requested to the expenses and reimburse- 
ments in the financial section. 

This past June, 1966, 36 students were graduated and 
of this number, 33 have gone on to further education. 

The rule regarding the entrance of pupils is as fol- 
lows: Any child who attains the age of six during the 
year in which entrance to the first grade is sought may 

118 



attend school beginning in September of that year. For 
example: A child having his sixth birthday on any day, 
including or between January 1, 1967 and December 31, 
1967, may enroll and attend school beginning September 
1967. 

It is the policy of the Hatfield School Department to 
hold regular sessions when it is practicable to operate the 
school buses. Parents are asked to use their own discre- 
tion as to the wisdom of sending their children to school 
on stormy mornings. In the event that it becomes neces- 
sary to cancel school sessions, the "No School Signal" will 
be broadcast over radio station WHMP starting at 6 a.m. 
and continuing through 8:30 a.m. The authorities of 
WHMP request that parents not call the radio station for 
this information, but listen for the announcements. 

National Education Week was observed from Novem- 
ber 7-10, 1966. Special times were set aside throughout 
the week for private parent-teacher conferences. The 
schools held open house on Wednesday evening of that 
week. Education week opened with the showing of the 
senior high school play entitled "If a Body Meet a Body" 
under the direction of Mr. John Naumowicz of the Smith 
Academy faculty. 

The bus routes were revised in September and the 
routes will be adhered to for the remainder of the year. 
A copy of the present routes follows this report. 

Released time for religious instruction was offered 
again this year. The following times are set aside each 
week so that pupils may benefit from religious instruction 
in denominations of their own choosing. Released time 
started on September 21, 1966 and will end on May 17, 
1967. 

Wednesday 10:45-11:30 Smith Academy students 

119 



Wednesday 12 :45 - 1 :30 Grades 6, 7, 8, and 9 
Wednesday 1 :50 - 2 :40 Grades 2, 3, 4, and 5 

An open-door policy is a vital part of our community- 
centered schools. Our teachers are an integral part of the 
open-door policy and are willing to help any parent. Par- 
ents are invited to visit us and see what and how their 
children learn in the classroom, but are requested to check 
through the principal's office first. 

For a more detailed report about our elementary and 
junior high schools, your attention is directed to Mrs. 
Breor's Principal's Report. 

May I, at this time, extend my appreciation for the 
cooperation and assistance rendered by the members of 
the school committee, to the town departments and towns- 
people, my appreciation for the cooperation which was re- 
ceived toward providing an education in keeping with the 
best interests of the students of Hatfield, and to the school 
department employees, my sincere thanks for their co- 
operation in meeting the educational needs of our children. 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI 
Superintendent of Schools 



120 



Bus Route 



Regular School Bus Schedule 
Elementary 

Run#l 

Bus leaves the high school, up School Street, down 
Prospect Street, up Bridge Street, left on Dwight 
Street, right on Elm Street, turn around at town line, 
back down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down 
Main Street to Elementary School. 

Run #2 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, up Dwight 
Street, up Elm Street, down Main Highway to make 
first pickup, left on Linseed Road to Stoddard resi- 
dence, turn around, back down Linseed Road to Main 
Highway, left, down Main Highway to Harubin's 
Service Station. Bus turns around here, takes right 
at Wolfram's Garage, left down Pantry Road, down 
Main Highway, left at and down Chestnut Street, 
down School Street, down Main Street, to Elementary 
School. 

Run #3 

Bus leaves the high school, to Bradstreet, to Whately 
town line, turns around, back down River Road, right 
at Bradstreet Cafe, to Main Highway, left down 
Prospect Street, down Chestnut Street, down School 
Street, to Elementary School. 

121 



Junior and Senior High Schools 

Run#l 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station to Bradstreet, 
to Whately town line, turns around, back down River 
Road, right at Bradstreet Cafe, to Main Highway, 
left down Prospect Street, down Chestnut Street, 
down School Street, to High School. 

Run #2 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, down Bridge 
Street, up Prospect Street, up Chestnut Street, right 
on Main Highway to Wolfram's Garage, left here and 
left again down Pantry Road, down Main Highway, 
left down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down Main 
Street to High School. 

Run #3 

Bus leaves Bridge Street station, down Dwight 
Street, down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down 
Main Street to High School. 

Times 

The buses will start the Junior and Senior High 
School runs at 7:30 and the Elementary runs at 7:55. 
The afternoon runs will start at 2:15 for the Junior 
and Senior High Schools and 2:50 for the Elemen- 
tary School. 

Vocational School Bus Run: 

Starting from the Whately-Hatfield town line on 
Route 5, proceeding south on West Street, left down 
Chestnut Street, down School Street, right and down 
Main Street, right and up Maple Street, up Elm Street 
to Smith's Vocational School. Return will be the re- 
verse. 

122 



Principal of the Elementary and 
Junior High Schools 



To the School Committee and the 
Superintendent of Schools: 

I wish to submit this eleventh annual report as prin- 
cipal of the Center Junior High School and the Hatfield 
Elementary School. 

It should be noted at this time that our school popu- 
lation has grown and will continue to grow in the future 
if the present trend is any indication. 

When the elementary school opened its doors in the 
fall of 1960, there were 279 pupils in grades one through 
six. October first of this year our enrollment was 352 
pupils in grades one through six. This is an increase of 
26%. Maximum enrollment for each classroom is 30 
pupils, but some of our classrooms have more than this 
number. Taxpayers and citizens in our town wonder why 
our expenditures might increase. If you have another 
26% to educate, it means more of everything we use for 
supplies, textbooks, equipment, personnel, bus service, and 
room. If our children are to compete with students from 
other areas for a place in the schools and colleges of their 
choice and in the business world, it will mean giving them 
the necessary educational foundation to meet this chal- 
lenge. We can't be extravagant or irresponsive, but neith- 
er can we neglect the educational needs of all our school 
children. 



123 



One of our most important innovations this past year 
was the opening of the Hatfield Elementary School Re- 
medial Reading and Language Development Center. The 
new program provides a remedial reading program and 
corrective measures for language development for those 
students who have been identified as educationally de- 
prived and need more complete diagnosis and remedial 
work than is possible in a regular classroom. 

The primary goals of this project are to provide more 
individualized instruction in reading than the classroom 
can offer and to improve the basic reading skills and lan- 
guage development of the students participating in this 
activity. 

Appropriate reading techniques, suitable reading ma- 
terials, and audio-visual aids are used to give each stu- 
dent instruction and practice that he needs to improve 
his reading achievement level. 

Funds made available for the project were 100% 
federal, with no local matching funds required. 

Our junior high school library benefited from Title II 
federal funds. Under this government project books were 
purchased and were 100% federal funded. Not one cent 
of our local tax money went into this project. The vol- 
umes contributed greatly to the effectiveness of our li- 
brary at the junior high level. 

Most of the science, English, mathematics, geogra- 
phy, and history materials and equipment, excluding text- 
books, were purchased under Title III PL 864. All of this 
equipment, such as the overhead projectors, records, film- 
strips, and science materials, are reimbursed 50% by the 
federal government. If the townspeople were to pay from 
their local tax dollar the full cost of these necessary items, 
we would find that the cost would be double on each dollar 
now expended. 

124 



Over the years, since these projects have been ap- 
proved by the federal government, our state of Massachu- 
setts has been accused of letting over a million federal dol- 
lars pass by because approved projects were not presented 
at the proper time. This can't be said of Hatfield. Our 
school committee and superintendent with others directly 
concerned with some of these activities have expended 
many hours surveying and researching our school area to 
see if this town would be eligible to participate in these 
government undertakings, which benefit not only the par- 
ticipants but indirectly the whole community. Once it was 
determined that we might apply for such aid, individuals 
worked long and tedious hours to formulate the plans and 
to submit the necessary data for approval. These were 
not easy tasks, but the school benefited so much, it was 
worth the effort. 

During the school year, the Hatfield Elementary 
School was fortunate to have the services of the Speech 
and Hearing Center at the University of Massachusetts 
available for the children whom we felt needed therapy. 
All severe cases were referred to the clinic by the princi- 
pal after obtaining the cooperation of the parents. The 
clinic arranges with the parents for the preliminary tests 
and diagnosis. Then corrective measures, if recommend- 
ed, are taken and therapy given. 

Several children have participated since the Center 
has been in operation. Even pre-school children with a 
speech problem have been recommended to the clinic. 
Some of the pupils have made such successful progress, 
they have been discharged from the clinic. 

To provide the junior high students with a wealth of 
good reading at minimum prices, a paperback library, on 
an experimental basis, has been introduced at the Center 
School. These quality paperbacks, the classic works pub- 
lished primarily for students, can be purchased during the 

125 



school day throughout the week. Every two weeks new 
titles are added and emptied shelves replenished. 

This library will expose the students to the vast 
range of good literature and will help to guide and to re- 
fine the literary tastes of those who purchase paperbacks 
for curricular use. 

Smith College officials donated several usable pieces 
of furniture from a building that was being dismantled. 
These included all the lockers found in the girls' and boys' 
basements at the Center School. The lockers have been 
assigned to each student, who uses it primarily for physi- 
cal education equipment. 

Two showcases on the first floor, typewriter desks, 
library shelving, etc., serve our needs well at the junior 
high. 

The Hatfield P.T.C. has generously provided each 
room at both the elementary school and the junior high 
school with audio-visual screens. 

Mr. Harry Blauvelt and the Misses Marion and Louisa 
Billings throughout the year contributed to our library at 
the junior high. Mr. Blauvelt each week sent us the New 
York Times and the Misses Billings provided the National 
Geographic Magazine. To them we are indebted. 

Textbooks in the various areas of the curriculum have 
been replaced wherever the need seemed most acute. Each 
year the texts are reviewed and recommendations for re- 
placements made. At the present time, the majority of 
the materials used are up-to-date and adequate. 

The schools observed American Education Week from 
November sixth through the twelfth. The theme for 1966 
was "Education Adds Up". We would like to feel that the 

126 



town of Hatfield is offering to each and every individual 
student an educational program and environment that 
provides for his immediate and future needs. The town, 
state, and federal government, working together on vari- 
ous educational projects, are offering our students some 
of the finest classroom materials, audio-visual aids, and 
other equipment to be used in the classrooms to enrich 
the learning situation so that it becomes an interesting, 
valuable, educational experience. 

The School Safety Patrol, which has been organized 
at both the elementary and junior high level, has served 
a definite need. These individuals give their time and 
energy to assist in the safety of the students on the buses, 
sidewalks, and crosswalks. On the buses they seat the 
pupils and assist them when they leave or enter the buses. 
They cooperate with the drivers and try to help wherever 
they can, because they know the great responsibility the 
bus drivers have, especially with the smaller children. At 
the junior high all classes crossing the Main Street for 
gym, lunch, etc., are under the leadership of the Safety 
Patrol. Their services have been of great importance to 
us. 

Many townspeople never visit our school and they 
really don't realize how much our all-purpose room is used. 
All the music classes, gym classes, lunches for 350 pupils, 
assemblies, girls' high school basketball practices and 
some games, boys' junior high basketball practices and all 
games, some P.T.C. meetings, teachers' meetings, etc., are 
held here. We have a tight schedule at all times. Prac- 
tices for classroom assemblies must be limited and the 
junior high basketball and girls' senior high team must 
share the facilities. It is constantly being used with very 
limited time allowed for thoroughly cleaning the area. Of 
all areas, this needs immediate and thorough cleaning, be- 
cause 350 children eat their lunches here each day. 

127 



In closing, may I sincerely thank the School Commit- 
tee, the Superintendent of Schools, the staff, the custo- 
dians, the pupils, and the townspeople for all their assist- 
ance throughout the year. It was greatly appreciated. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. DOROTHY BREOR 

Principal 



128 



School Savings 



Tuesdays are thrift days in Elementary and Center 
schools — bank days in school — Mondays in Smith Acad- 
emy. 

The three mutual savings banks — Florence Savings 
Bank, Nonotuck Savings Bank and Northampton Institu- 
tion for Savings sponsor these bank days. 

By banking something consistently each week a sub- 
stantial sum may be accumulated. Interest is paid on 
School Savings after the first $3 has been deposited. 

In Smith Academy, students make club payments on 
Monday. There are two clubs from which to choose — 50^ 
and $1 weekly. 

The 50^ club expires at $25 and the $1 club at $50. 

Clubs are excellent for specific purposes. There are 
no definite expiration dates — they may be started or 
completed at any time — and after the last payment has 
been made the book can be taken to the bank to collect 
the money. 

Last school year $14,937.32 was banked in the Hat- 
field school system — an increase of $1,778.42 over the pre- 
vious year. 

If proper encouragement is offered the children, we 
feel that they will learn to adopt the thrift habit and en- 
joy banking at school on Tuesdays. 

129 



A goal is worthwhile, something to save for, and a 
feeling of accomplishment will be derived when the goal 
is achieved. 



Respectfully submitted, 

(MRS.) V. S. CONNORS 

School Savings Director 



130 



School Health 



To the Superintendent and 
School Committee of Hatfield : 

I herewith submit my annual report, the 15th, as the 
school nurse of Hatfield. 

Health appraisal may be defined as "the cooperative 
process of determining the total health status of the 
child". Many persons contribute to such an appraisal, 
namely, parents, family physician, teacher, nurse and 
school physician. Health appraisal includes : teacher-nurse 
conferences, health history, screening tests, disease pre- 
ventative measures and follow-up visits to the homes. 

Physical examinations have been completed. As in 
the past, parents of children in grades one and four were 
invited to be present at the time their child was examined. 
Many parents availed themselves of this opportunity to 
discuss the health status of their child with the school 
physician. Other grades examined were 7, 9, 12, and ath- 
letes of grades 8, 10, 11. Disabilities and defects which 
were found were brought to the attention of the parents. 

The vision test was given to 612 pupils with 45 fail- 
ing the retest. Of this number, 39 were seen by an eye 
specialist while 6 did not report. 

The Pure Tone hearing test was given to 616 pupils 
with 11 failing the retest. Of this number, 9 were seen by 
an ear specialist with 2 failing to report. 

131 



As a prophylactic measure, flu vaccine was offered to 
the faculty. Twenty-eight teachers received a booster 
dose of the vaccine. 

The Tine Tuberculin test was administered in May to 
children in grades 1, 4, 8, and 12, teachers, janitors and 
lunchroom workers. A total of 238 were tested with 5 
positive reactions. All were X-rayed and the results were 
negative. 

Three immunization clinics were held in the spring. 
Booster doses for the prevention of Diphtheria, Whooping 
Cough and Tetanus were given to 411 children. The Adult 
type was given to 29 seniors. 

Communicable diseases reported during the year 
were as follows: Scarlet Fever — 12, Chicken Pox — 5, 
Mumps — 4, Hepatitis — 1. 

Registration for incoming first grade children was 
held in May with 51 children reporting. 

The annual census of all children under 16 years of 
age, living in Hatfield, was completed in October. The an- 
nual census of physically handicapped children was com- 
pleted in November. 

My sincerest appreciation is extended to Dr. Byrne, 
Dr. Kaiser, school officials, teachers and parents for their 
assistance and co-operation in the school health program. 



Respectfully submitted, 

LUCILLE H. GODEK, R.N. 

132 



School Lunch 



The aims of the school lunch program are to offer 
meals that meet the nutritional needs of students and to 
develop the inherent educational values of the program 
for better health. The program each day serves a "Type 
A" lunch that meets the requirements of the National 
School Lunch Program. This consists of, as a minimum, 
two ounces cooked, lean meat, poultry or fish or two 
ounces of cheese; one egg or one-half cup cooked dry 
beans or peas, or four tablespoons of peanut butter or an 
equivalent quantity of a combination of two of these items, 
served in a main dish or in a main dish and one other 
menu item; three-fourths cup serving of two or more 
vegetables or fruits, or both; one slice enriched bread or 
the equivalent; two teaspoons butter; one-half pint whole, 
unflavored milk. No dessert is required, but we include 
one with every hot lunch served. Special attention is given 
to include adequate servings of Vitamin C rich food daily 
and Vitamin A food twice a week. With the above, the 
student gets one-third of his daily nutritional require- 
ments. 

The two school cafeterias serve an average of 545 
meals a day. They are ably staffed by the following quali- 
fied personnel : Mrs. Winifred Betsold, manager, and Mrs. 
Hazel Roberts, assistant manager. Their assistants are 
Mrs. Wanda Shea, Mrs. Bertha Kosakowski, Mrs. Mary 
Vachula, Mrs. Phyllis Kuzontkoski, Mrs. Mary Winters, 
and Mrs. Helen Rudy. 

The cafeteria personnel once again attended the state 
sponsored School Lunch Conference this year. National 
School Lunch Week was observed in October 1966. 



133 



Equipment and utensils, as needed, have been pur- 
chased for both cafeterias. Maintenance and repair pro- 
grams were also carried out. 

The menus of the school lunch program were pub- 
lished in the daily newspapers and were also posted in the 
classrooms. State and Federal Aid in the form of cash re- 
imbursements and food donations make it possible to offer 
the hot lunch to students for 25 cents, and the amount of 
food value received for this price is the best bargain one 
can get. The elementary and junior high pupils are super- 
vised by the homeroom teachers, with over-all supervision 
by the principal, Mrs. Dorothy Breor. The high school stu- 
dents are supervised by the high school teachers with 
over-all supervision by the high school principal, Mr. John 
A. Skarzynski. 

The financial account of the lunch program can be 
found in the town accountant's report which appears in 
another section of this town report. 

The following is an accounting of the number of 
lunches served during the past year: 





Days 
Lunch Served 


No. of 
Lunches Served 


January 


21 


11,393 


February 


15 


7,893 


March 


23 


12,360 


April 


15 


8,066 


May 


21 


11,122 


June 


11 


5,664 



134 



September 


18 


10,083 


October 


19 


10,520 


November 


18 


9,817 


December 


16 


8,594 



177 95,512 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI 

Director, Hatfield School Lunch 



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137 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 1966 



Regular Day School 

Regular day school : 

Appropriation for support $257,736.00 

Unpaid bills 5,866.37 



Total Expenditures for support $263,602.37 
Expenditures from PL 874 1,903.27 

Expenditures from PL 864 1,821.67 



Total expenditures $267,327.31 

Credits : Reimbursements to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

General School Fund (Chap. 70) $ 19,264.76 

Transportation 7,586.00 

Sales Tax (estimated) 28,000.00 

Total reimbursement for regular day school 
to Town of Hatfield from Commonwealth $ 54,850.76 



Credits : Reimbursement to School Committee 
from Federal Government : 

Federal Law — PL 874 $ 8,090.00 

Federal Law — PL 864 1,113.63 



Total reimbursement to School Committee 

received from Federal Government $ 9,203.63 

138 



Vocational Tuition and Transportation 

Vocational Tuition and Transportation : 

Appropriation for support $ 12,680.05 

From Reserve Fund 140.05 



Total support $ 12,820.10 

Credits : Reimbursements to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
Vocational Tuition and Transportation: 

Vocational Tuition $ 2,533.18 

Vocational Transportation 626.50 



Total reimbursement for Vocational Tuition 
and Transportation to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth $ 3,159.68 



139 



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140 



HATFIELD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL BUDGET ESTIMATE 

1967 



Function : 

1000 Administration $ 8,050.00 

2000 Instruction 238,021.00 

3000 Other School Services 21,010.00 

4000 Operation & Maintenance of Plant 39,830.00 

5000 Fixed Charges 505.00 

7000 Acquisition of Equipment 4,800.00 



TOTAL BUDGET ESTIMATE $312,216.00 



1967 BUDGET ESTIMATE 
Administration — 1000 



Superintendent's Salary $ 


4,500.00 


Superintendent's Clerk 


2,400.00 


Substitute Clerk 


200.00 


Census 


90.00 


Superintendent's Office Expenses 


230.00 


Superintendent's Expenses 


350.00 


Superintendent's Out of State Travel 


210.00 


Co-operative School Service Center 


70.00 



Total $ 8,050.00 

Instruction — 2000 

Elementary Principal's Salary $ 6,514.00 

Elementary Office Expenses 50.00 

Elementary Principal's Expenses 50.00 

Junior High Principal's Salary 3,257.00 

141 



Junior High Office Expense 


50.00 


Junior High Principal's Expense 


50.00 


Secondary Principal's Salary 


7,450.00 


Secondary Office Expenses 


125.00 


Secondary Principal's Expenses 


135.00 


Graduation 


300.00 


Unclassified — 


2300 


Research and Development 


$ 2,500.00 


Head Start Program 


2,000.00 


Title III 


400.00 


Music Salary 


3,620.00 


Music Salary — Pianist 


100.00 


Miscellaneous 


125.00 


Elementary Salaries 


82,310.00 


Kindergarten 


0.00 


Penmanship 


540.00 


Salaries — Handicapped Children 


500.00 


Elementary Instructional Supplies 


3,200.00 


ETV Membership 


255.00 


Elementary staff travel 


200.00 


Out of State — teacher travel 


0.00 


Junior High Salaries 


51,540.00 


Physical Education 


2,100.00 


Junior High Instructional Supplies 


2,500.00 


Junior High staff travel 


200.00 


Out of state — teacher travel 


0.00 


Secondary Salaries 


54,240.00 


Secondary Instructional Supplies 


2,000.00 


Driver Education 


450.00 


Senior High staff travel 


200.00 


Out of state — teacher travel 


0.00 


Elementary Textbooks 


1,500.00 


Junior High Textbooks 


900.00 


Secondary Textbooks 


1,200.00 


Elementary Library 


200.00 


Elementary Library Books 


130.00 



142 



Junior High Library 300.00 

Junior High Library Books 130.00 

Secondary Library 200.00 

Elementary A.V. Aids 100.00 

Junior High A.V. Aids 100.00 

Secondary A. V. Aids 100.00 

Contracted Services — Guidance 400.00 

Supplies and Materials 700.00 

Travel and Meetings 100.00 



Total 


$233,021.00 


Other School Services - 


-3000 


Nurse's Salary $ 


3,000.00 


Health Supplies 


110.00 


School Nurse's Expenses 


100.00 


Elementary Field Trips 


200.00 


Junior High Field Trips 


200.00 


Secondary Field Trips 


200.00 


Pupil Transportation 


14,600.00 


Bus 


0.00 


Athletic Transportation 


1,200.00 


Police — Athletic Contracted 




Services 


200.00 


Athletic Expenses and Awards 


1,200.00 



Total $ 21,010.00 

Operation and Maintenance of Plant — 4000 

Elementary Custodial Salary $ 5,200.00 

Elementary Custodial Substitute 200.00 

Elementary Custodial Supplies 2,000.00 

Junior High Custodial Salary 4,600.00 

Junior High Custodial Substitute 200.00 

Junior High Custodial Supplies 900.00 

Secondary Custodial Salary 4,200.00 

143 



Secondary Custodial Substitute 200.00 

Secondary Custodial Supplies 650.00 

Town Hall Custodial Supplies 180.00 

Elementary Fuel 2,900.00 

Junior High Fuel 2,100.00 

Secondary Fuel 1,200.00 

Elementary Electricity 3,200.00 

Elementary Telephone 185.00 

Junior High Electricity 425.00 

Junior High Telephone 190.00 

Secondary Electricity 440.00 

Secondary Telephone 270.00 

Alterations — Unclassified 100.00 
School Street School Maintenance 

and Repair 100.00 

Elementary Maintenance and Repair 2,830.00 

ETV Maintenance 110.00 

Junior High Maintenance and Repair 6,605.00 

Secondary Maintenance and Repair 195.00 

Maintenance, Classroom Typewriters 250.00 

School Vehicles 400.00 



Total 


$ 39,830.00 


Fixed Charges - 


-5000 


Liability Insurance 
Athletic Insurance 
Rental of Land, etc. 


$ 50.00 

455.00 

0.00 



Total $ 505.00 

Acquisition of Equipment — 7300 

New Equipment $ 4,025.00 



Total $ 4,025.00 

144 



Non- Appropriated Federal Funds 
Contractual 



Title I, 89-10 Funds 


$ 5,000.00 


Title II, 89-10 Funds 


0.00 


Voc. Ed. Act, 1963 PL-88-210 


775.00 


Title III, 89-10 Funds 


0.00 



Total $ 5,775.00 



TOTAL BUDGET ESTIMATE $312,216.00 



REIMBURSEMENT — ANTICIPATED 

Transportation Aid, Chap. 71, Sec. 72 $ 7,586.00 

PL_874 — Available and Anticipated 26,000.00 

PL-864 — Available and Anticipated 1,500.00 

PL-89-10 Remedial Reading 5,000.00 

Voc. Ed. Act, 1963, PL-88-210 575.00 

State School Aid Chapter 70 — 1967 30,000.00 



$ 70,661.00 
Total Appropriation 312,216.00 

Available & Estimated Receipts 70,661.00 



Estimated Net Cost to Town $241,555.00 



145 



HATFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

1966-1967 



1966 


Sept. 


6 


Sept. 


7 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


23 


Nov. 


28 


Dec. 


23 


1967 


Jan. 


2 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


27 


Mar. 


24 


Apr. 


19-21 


Apr. 


24 


May 


30 


June 


15 


(182 days) 


June 


16 


(183 days) 



Staff meeting — 9:30 a.m. 
Schools open — full sessions 
Columbus Day — no school 
Teachers' Convention — no school 
Veterans' Day — no school 
Thanksgiving recess 
Schools close — full sessions 
Schools open — full sessions 
Christmas recess 
Schools close — full sessions 

Schools reopen — full sessions 

Schools close for winter vacation 

Schools reopen — full sessions 

Good Friday — no school 

Patriots' Day and Two Days Spring 

Vacation — no school 

Schools reopen — full sessions 

Memorial Day — no school 

Elementary School pupils dismissed with 

report cards. 

Teachers will report until closing details 

completed. 

Junior and Senior High School students 

dismissed with report cards. 

Teachers will report until closing details 

completed. 

High School graduation 

146 




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We will never bring disgrace to this our 
city, by any act of dishonesty or cowardice, 
nor ever desert our suffering comrades in 
the ranks; we will fight for the ideals and 
sacred things of the city, both alone and with 
many; we will revere and obey the city's 
laws and do our best to incite a like respect 
in those above us who are prone to annul or 
set them at naught; we will strive unceas- 
ingly to quicken the public's sense of civic 
duty, thus in all these ways we will transmit 
this city not only less, but greater and more 
beautiful than it was transmitted to us. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1967 



Printed by 

Gazette Printing Company, Inc. 

Northampton, Mass. 



Town Officers for 1 967 



SELECTMEN 



Frank J. Godek, Chairman 
A. Cory Bardwell Stanley J. Filipek 

MODERATOR 

Gordon A. Woodward 

TOWN CLERK - TREASURER 

Peter S. Rogaleski 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Mitchell W. Kempisty, Chairman 
Richard D. Belden Joseph S. Wilkes 

TAX COLLECTOR 

Thomas L. Mullany 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Ethel I. Byrne, Chairman 
Stanley Sliwoski Henry F. Kulesza 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Ralph F. Vollinger, Chairman 
Rupert Harubin John R. Rudy 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Arthur Cory Bardwell, Chairman 
William Podmayer Edward Kowalski 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Dorothy Breor, Chairman 
Rita Prew Michael M. Majeskey 

ELECTOR UNDER THE WILL OF OLIVER SMITH 

Henry P. Betsold 

TREE WARDEN 

Francis E. Godin 

( 
PLANNING BOARD 

Francis H. Hebert, Chairman 
William H. Burke III Henry F. Szych 

John S. Besko Stanley Sliwoski 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Gordon Woodward, Jr. John Besko 

Henry Skorupski William Korza 

Gordon Williams — State Appointed 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

Henry Betsold, Chairman 
Bernard J. Kosior Thomas P. Mullins 

James Mullins Kenneth Balise 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Thaddeus Kabat, Chairman 
Robert Polhemus Leon C. Maksimoski 

Alternates 

Harold Lyman Wiliam E. Boyle 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Atty. Elizabeth A. Porada 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Joseph V. Porada, Jr., Chairman 
Frederick J. Zehelski Edward J. Wickles 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Howard B. Abbott, Chairman 

Joseph J. Pelc Peter S. Rogaleski 

Edward T. Kostek 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Gertrude B. Rogaleski 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

John J. Deres 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS & SLAUGHTER 

Frank Sikorski, Jr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Albert E. Jenest — 210 Elm St., Greenfield 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS 

Charles J. Eberlein, Sr. 

COLLECTOR OF WATER RENTS 

Harold B. Lizek 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

John A. Skarzynski 

DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Thomas P. Mullins 



WOOD SURVEYORS 

Bernard Donnis Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



Joseph V. Porada 
John Osley, Jr. 



Peter Kubosiak 
Elizabeth Porada 



John W. Filipek, Jr. 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Paul Stefancik 

FENCE VIEWERS AND FIELD DRIVERS 

Michael M. Majeskey Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Henry J. Sliwoski 



CONSTABLES 



Henry J. Sliwoski 
James E. McGrath 
Joseph S. Wilkes 
Henry KosakowsM 
George W. Rogalewski 
Anthony Malinowski 
Stanley Malinowski 



Mitchell W. Kempisty 

Peter Kubosiak 

Stanley J. Filipek 

John Brennan 

William Podmayer 

Peter P. Backiel 

George Omasta 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Anthony J. Sikorski 
William A. Symanski 
Harold B. Lizek 
William Slowikowski 
Stanley S. Symanski 
David E. Omasta 



Adolf Ciszewski 

Stanley Jagodzinski 

Robert Thayer 

Ralph F. Vollinger 

Frank Godek 

Thaddeus Kabat 



John Szych 



SPECIAL POLICE 

Joseph Deres 

FIRE CHIEF 

Myron J. Sikorski 



FIREFIGHTERS 

Main Street Station 



Proulx, Alfred, Deputy Chief 
Boyle, William, Captain 
Sikorski, Frank, Captain 
Lizek, David, Lieut. 
Kotch, Peter, Lieut. 
Osepowicz, Robert 
Slysz, Stanley, Jr. 
Pelis, Bernard 
Prucnal, Carl 
Vollinger, Richard 
Boyle, Marcus 



Korza, William 

Petrowicz, Richard 

Petrowicz, Charles 

Rogalewski, John 

Shea, Robert 

Zych, Joseph 

Gizienski, John 

Pease, Marshall 

Shaw, Bernard 

Vollinger, Donald 

Eugene Dugal 



North Hatfield Station 



Belden, Richard, Asst. Chief 

Kempisty, Edward, Deputy Chief 

Sysun, Connie 

Omasta, Ronald 

Stevens, Richard 

Kubilis, Louis 

Symanski, Anthony 



Bielunis, Adam 

Omasta, Michael 

Maiewski, Philip 

Smiarowski, Teddy 

Baceski, Andrew 

Southard, David 

Mieleszko, Joseph 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Incorporated 1670 

AREA 

8900 Acres 

ELEVATION 

132 Feet at Main Street 

POPULATION 

1966 Census — 2814 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Second Hampshire District 

DAVID MADSEN 

STATE SENATOR 

Franklin & Hampshire District 
JOHN D. BARRUS 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 
First Congressional District 

SILVIO 0. CONTE 

SENATORS IN CONGRESS 

EDWARD BROOKS 
EDWARD M. KENNEDY 

10 



Selectmen's Warrant 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Hatfield in 
said County, Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby 
directed to notify and warn the Inhabitants of said Town 
qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to meet in 
Memorial Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the nine- 
teenth day of February next, at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, then and there to take action under Article 1, and to 
meet at seven o'clock in the evening to take action on all 
other articles: 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for 
the following year: One Selectman for three years; one 
member of the Board of Assessors for three years; one 
member of the School Committee for three years; one 
member of the School Committee for two years; one mem- 
ber of the School Committee for one year; one member of 
the Board of Water Commissioners for three years; one 
member of the Library Trustees for three years; one 
Elector under the will of Oliver Smith for one year; one 
member of the Planning Board for five years ; one member 
of the Sewer Commission for three years ; one member of 
the Hatfield Housing Authority for five years; and one 
member of the Cemetery Commission for three years. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon 
and kept open until eight o'clock in the evening. 

11 



Article 2. To hear and discuss all reports or sub- 
jects which have to do with the welfare of the Town, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial years, beginning January 1, 1968 
and January 1, 1969 in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with the provisions of Section 17, 
Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $152.14 received from the Dog Fund to the 
Library Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate a sum of money from the State Aid for Libraries 
Account to the Library Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer such sums of money as shall 
be deemed necessary to defray the current expenses and 
charges of the financial year, including debt and interest ; 
set the salaries for all elected officials in accordance with 
the provisions of Section 108, Chapter 41 of the General 
Laws; and provide for a reserve fund; or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, including appropriations from available 
funds, the sum of $5,338.25 as allocated by the actuary 
and certified by the County Commissioners to the Town 
of Hatfield under the provisions of Chapter 32, General 
Laws, as amended, and pay said amount to the Treasurer- 
Custodian of the Hampshire County Retirement System. 

12 



Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to cooperate with the County and State 
under the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, the Town's 
share for improvement of Chapter 90 highways, and to 
appropriate the sum of $2,000.00, the State and County 
share, for the same purpose, in anticipation of reimburse- 
ment from the State and County ; the Town's share to be 
raised by taxation and the State and County share to be 
taken from Surplus Revenue and returned to same when 
reimbursement is received, or act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to cooperate with the State under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 81, General Laws, and to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $8,500.00, the Town's share, and to 
appropriate the sum of $14,025.00, the State's share, in 
anticipation of reimbursement from the State ; the Town's 
share to be raised by taxation and the State's share to be 
taken from Surplus Revenue and returned to same when 
reimbursement is received, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to cooperate with the State and County 
under the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $4,550.00, as the Town's 
share, the sum of $4,550.00, as the County's share, and 
the sum of $9,100.00, as the State's share, for new con- 
struction on School and King Streets in the Town of Hat- 
field, the Town's share to be raised by taxation and the 
State and County's share to be taken from surplus revenue 
and returned to same when reimbursement is received, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to trans- 
fer from Machinery Earnings Account the sum of 
$5,500.00 for the purchase of a new sidewalk tractor and 
equipment for said sidewalk tractor, or act anything 
thereon. 

13 



Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 for the survey and up- 
dating of bounds of King and South Streets in the Town 
of Hatfield, Massachusetts, or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the Town wil vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 for the resurfacing and 
repair of the sidewalk on Main Street from a point com- 
mencing at the intersection of the westerly side of Main 
Street with the southerly side of School Street and run- 
ning in a southerly direction along the old sidewalk bed 
on the westerly side of Main Street approximately 1,000 
feet, or act anything thereon. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate and/or transfer an additional sum of 
$1,500.00 to electrify the town clock, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to place 
street lights in the following locations: 

At the residence of Joseph Kabat on South 

Street, pole #14, 
At the residence of Stanley Symanski on Straits 

Road, pole #61, 
At the residence of Marion Zgrodnik on Elm 

Court, pole #11/65, 
At the residence of Brenda E. Minisci on Pantry 

Road, pole #25/16, 
At the residence of Edward Malloy on Straits 

Road, pole #56. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $196.10 to pay an unpaid bill due the 
Massachusetts Civil Defense in the amount of said 
$196.10, or act anything thereon. 

14 



Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to pay to 
Joseph J. Wendolowski and Agnes R. Wendolowski the 
sum of $100.00 as the purchase price or as damages for a 
taking by eminent domain in accordnace with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 79 of the General Laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, as amended by the County Com- 
missioners of that tract of land, containing 747 square 
feet situated on the northerly side of Chestnut Street in 
the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts, belonging to said 
Wendolowskis, hereinafter described, for the layout, re- 
location, and alteration of the existing county layout of 
Chestnut Street, a public way in the Town of Hatfield, 
Massachusetts, or taken any action relative thereto. 

Said tract of land is described as follows : That tract 
of land triangular in shape, situated north of the 
existing county layout of Chestnut Street in the 
Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts, more particularly 
bounded and described as follows : 

Beginning at a concrete bound set in the north- 
erly sideline of the existing county layout of Chest- 
nut Street in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts, 
said concrete bound being further located one (1) 
foot from the westerly bound of property belonging 
to Joseph J. and Agnes R. Wendolowski, Jr. and the 
easterly bound of property belonging now or former- 
ly of Stephen Osley and thence turning and running 
S. 70° 25' 50" E. one hundred and fifty-three and sev- 
enty-six one-hundredths (153.76) feet, more or less, 
to a concrete bound; thence turning and running in 
a south-westerly direction eighty-five and no one- 
hundredths (85.00) feet, more or less, to a point; 
thence turning and running in a northwesterly direc- 
tion seventy and no one-hundredths (70.00) feet, 
more or less, to a concrete bound and the point of 
beginning. Containing seven hundred and forty-seven 
(747) square feet, more or less. 

15 



Hereby conveying the premises shown as Taking 
No. 1 of Joseph J. and Agnes R. Wendolowski, Jr. on 
a plan of land entitled "Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts Hampshire County Plan Of Chestnut Street, 
Hatfield Altered By The County Commissioners May 
14, 1966 — Scale 1" = 40' Aimer Huntley, Jr., & 
Associates, Inc., 30 Crafts Avenue, Northampton, 
Mass." to be recorded in the Hampshire County Reg- 
istry of Deeds. 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 for experimental mosquito 
control work in the Town, or take any action thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 for repairs to the Town 
Hall, or take any action thereon. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to increase 
the limit on the proportion of the costs and expenses of 
the Lower Pioneer Valley Regional Planning District set 
by the Town under Article 18 of the Town Meeting on 
February 20, 1967, from eight cents ($.08) per capita 
based on the 1960 federal census to twelve cents ($.12) 
per capita based on the most recent federal census, all 
under the provisions of Section 7, Chapter 40B of the 
General Laws, and to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$300.00 to meet the cost and expenses of the Town's mem- 
bership in said Regional Planning District. 



Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to estab- 
lish and accept as a town way the layout of the following 
street in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts : 

Plantation Road, a strip of land approximately fifty- 
five feet in width running in an easterly direction 

16 



from the easterly side of Gore Avenue, a public way 
in the Town of Hatfield, to the northerly side of 
Bridge Street in the Town of Hatfield, as shown on a 
plan of land entitled "Definitive Subdivision Plan 
Land in Hatfield, Mass., Belonging to Theodore 
Blauvelt" dated October 7, 1961, and recorded in the 
Hampshire County Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 
62, Page 17, to which reference is made for a more 
particular description thereof, and on file in the Office 
of the Town Clerk, Hatfield, Massachusetts. 



Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the committee of ten known as the Hatfield Tercentenary 
Committee, appointed by the Moderator under the pro- 
visions of Article 18 of the Annual Town Meeting War- 
rant of February 21, 1966, to formulate all plans and take 
all action for the Town's observance of its 300th anniver- 
sary in 1970, and to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$3,500.00 for use of said committee for celebration of Hat- 
field's 300th anniversary in 1970, or take any action 
thereon. 



Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the selectmen to file a petition with the General Court for 
legislation authorizing and directing the State Treasurer 
to pay the Town of Hatfield such sums that would be due 
to said Town from the Commonwealth, if an application 
for a State School Construction Grant for the construction 
and equipping by said town of a new high school had been 
filed by said town and approved by the Department of 
Education under the provisions of Chapter 645 of the Acts 
of 1948 as amended and directing the State Department of 
Education to determine the amounts and the time of said 
payments and to certify the same to the controller as pro- 
vided by said Chapter 645, and the Treasurer to make the 
payments to the Town as certified. 

17 



Article 24. To see if the Town will vote in com- 
memoration of those who served in the military service of 
the Commonwealth in time of war to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1,000.00 for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for such veterans organizations incorporated 
or chartered by the Congress of the United States as have 
been in operation for at least three years and for such 
other veterans organizations listed under the provisions 
of Chapter 40, Section 9, said sum to be paid to American 
Legion Post 344 for use of a room or rooms in said Ameri- 
can Legion Headquarters for said purpose, or take any 
action relative thereto. 



Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate the sum of $4,800.00 for the purchase of a trailer- 
mounted self powered sewer cleaning machine with the 
necessary cutters and brushes and to determine whether 
this money should be provided for by taxation or by 
appropriation from the sewer revenue reserve fund or by 
a combination of both of these methods, or take any action 
relative thereto. 



Article 26. To see if the Town will vote to rescind 
its vote under Article 22 of the Annual Town Meeting 
Warrant held on February 20, 1967, in which the Town 
voted subject to the approval of the County Commission- 
ers for the discontinuance as a public way of that exten- 
sion of Prospect Street in the Town running in the rear 
of the American Legion Home property from Elm Street 
east to the northerly boundary line of the American Le- 
gion property and to reestablish and to confirm said way 
as a public way, or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 for the purchase of a copy 
machine or take any action thereon. 

18 



Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $150.00 to promote the amenities 
of the Town and to promote places of historical value by 
the Town's participation of the 250th anniversary cele- 
bration of Granby and Sunderland and the 200th anni- 
versary celebration of the Town of Worthington. 

Article 29. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $2,700.00 from the Sewer Revenue Reserve 
fund and the sum of $800.00 from the account established 
for the cleaning, improving, and repairing of the Elm 
Street Sewage Disposal to the Sewer Maintenance Ac- 
count, or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 for the appraisal and/or 
survey of land to be purchased or taken by eminent do- 
main for a town dump, or take any action thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof in five public places in the Town of 
Hatfield, seven days before time of said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time 
and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 30th day of January in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
sixty-eight. 

FRANKJ.GODEK 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
A.CORYBARDWELL 

Selectmen of Hatfield 
19 



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24 



Selectmen's Report 



The Board of Selectmen would like to take this oppor- 
tunity to welcome all the new citizens of Hatfield during 
the year 1967. 

To all the citizens of the Town of Hatfield, we the 
Board of Selectmen respectfully submit our annual report 
for 1967. 

A proclamation was signed the week of May 21 - 27 
proclaiming "Hatfield Clean-up Week", which began the 
reseeding the lawn and replacing the overgrown shrubs 
in front of the Memorial Town Hall. Five new sets of 
doors were replaced in the Town Hall and new ceiling 
lights were installed in the gymnasium. In conjunction 
with beautification week, a project was carried out to have 
all abandoned vehicles removed from private residences 
which had become a definite eyesore. The entrance to the 
town dump was regraded and reseeded and reposted to 
help prevent the dumping of trash and to make the en- 
trance more presentable. 

The most recent industry in our town in 1967 was the 
construction of the Multicolor Corporation, of Florence, 
located in the Dwight and Elm Street area. There are two 
buildings under construction — the nearly completed 
73,920 square foot one story factory building — and a 121 
foot by 36 foot office building. 



Another very important project carried out in 1967 
was the numbering of all homes in our town. 

25 



Ten private residences were constructed — compared 
with twenty-nine of a year ago. There were two in-the- 
ground pools and eleven smaller structures totaling an 
estimated cost of $198,845. "New home" breakdown for 
the preceding years: 1963 13, 1964 11, and 1965 20. 

A Tercentenary Committee was formed and many 
local clubs and organizations have combined to make our 
300 Anniversary Celebration in 1970. 

Road repair and maintenance and reconstruction has 
progressed in a satisfactory manner with concentration 
on School Street, under Chapter 90 — new construction 
has been completed about halfway. Future construction 
on School Street to Main Street will be completed in 1968. 
Main Street was resurfaced under Chapter 90 mainte- 
nance, part of School Street under Chapter 81. 

Larger wattage lights were installed on Main Street 
and newer lighting was installed on lower Main Street. 

The Board meets every first and third Tuesday eve- 
ning at 7 :30 P.M. of each month. The door is always open 
to all who may seek information of any kind. Many times 
misinformation can be cleared through discussion and 
complete understanding accomplished. 

At this time we would like to express our appreciation 
to all officers and departments for their co-operation in 
the year 1967. 

FRANK GODEK, Chairman 
STANLEY FILIPEK 
A. CORY BARD WELL 

Board of Selectmen 
26 



List of Jurors 



Bardwell, Helen H. 
Blyda, Joseph A., Jr. 
Deane, Michael T. 
Duga, Anna A. 
Englehardt, Marion 
Filipek, Ann B. 
Garstka, John 
Gore, Eva 
Hart, Jovita D. 
Kabat, Helen R. 
Kuzontkoski, Phillis A. 
Maciorowski, Jessie A. 
Maksimoski, Leon C. 
Malinowski, Anthony E. 
Michajluk, Elizabeth J. 
Michaluk, Joseph 
Mieleszko, Sophie 
Pickunka, Walter A. 
Polhemus, Nancy 
Riley, Daniel F. 
Rogaleski, Gertrude B. 
Scavotto Jane A. 
Shea, John T. 
Slowikowski, William J 
Staszko, Alexander 
Stef ancik, Anne 
Strong, Irene A. 
Szych, Irene A. 
Vollinger, Doris 
Yagodzinski, Rosalie M. 
Ziezulewicz, Stanley E. 



Housewife 

Farmer 

Attendant 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Attendant 

Tobacco Maint. Foreman 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Manufacturer 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Truck Driver 

Service Manager 

Construction 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Food Handler 



27 



Treasurer's Report 



PETER S. ROGALESKI, Treasurer 

In account with the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts 
Cash on Hand, January 1, 1967 $ 233,075.92 



;ipts for 1967: 




January 


$ 31,686.53 


February 


19,398.94 


March 


41,712.40 


April 


16,570.52 


May 


49,219.64 


June 


44,132.48 


July 


74,183.47 


August 


83,961.47 


September 


61,005.07 


October 


88,936.82 


November 


157,567.93 


December 


147,002.97 



815,378.24 
$ 1,048,454.16 



28 



Payments per Warrants : 








January- 


$ 


24,818.55 




February 




54,312.29 




March 




55,858.10 




April 




45,242.09 




May 




50,672.18 




June 




44,509.94 




July 




71,491.50 




August 




41,405.15 




September 




79,357.37 




October 




97,620.40 




November 




54,261.77 




December 




140,567.55 


760,120.89 






Cash on Hand, December 


31, 196 

In- 
come 

703.10 


7 

$ 


288,333.27 




1,048,454.16 


Cemetery Perpetual 
Care Funds $ 


With 
drawn 

$639.85 


Balance 

$23,319.33 


Hannah W. Smith 

(Custody State Treas.) 






300.00 


Firemen's Relief 
Fund 


4.87 




118.61 


Stabilization Fund 3,493.48 


.... 


84,829.12 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Treasurer 

29 



Assessors' Report 



Value of Assessed Real Estate 


$ 14,832,550.00 


Value of Assessed Personal Property- 


993,600.00 


Total Value Personal & Real 


$ 15,826,150.00 


Number of Acres of Land 


9,080 


Number of Dwellings 


810 


Overlay for Abatements 


$ 31,631.90 


Town Apropriation 


582,464.96 


State Audit 


1,489.19 


State Parks and Reservations 


2,858.29 


County Tax 


32,455.25 


County Hospital 


2,329.70 


Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 


274.65 


School Library and Lunch 


5,807.09 


ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 


Excise Tax 


$ 52,542.25 


Licenses 


6,200.00 


Interest on Taxes 


2,500.00 


All Other Estimated Receipts 


1,482.09 


Cherry Sheet Appendix 


153,035.42 


Motor Courts and Parks 


200.00 


Total Estimated Receipts 


216,533.47 


Total of Available Funds 


80,186.79 


Amount to be raised by Taxation 


364,001.45 



30 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Church Property $304,850.00 

Town Property 955,050.00 

Smith Academy 63,000.00 

Cemeteries 103,000.00 

American Legion 35,000.00 

D.P.W. Office 475,000.00 

Water Supply System 90,000.00 

Schools 798,000.00 

Highway Department 150,000.00 



MITCHELL W. KEMPISTY, Chm. 
RICHARD D. BELDEN 
JOSEPH S. WILKES 



Board of Assessors 



31 



Town Clerk's Report 





VITAL 


STATISTICS 








1967 








Births 




Marriages 


Deaths 


Male 


23 




27 


12 


Female 


19 






5 


Total 


42 




27 


17 




Preceding Five Years 




1966 


34 




25 


26 


1965 


43 




29 


31 


1964 


43 




29 


29 


1963 


43 




20 


31 


1962 


35 




17 


27 



LICENSES 



1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 
1963 



Dog 

248 
227 
208 
192 
190 



Fish & Game 

396 
386 
416 
414 
379 



ELECTIONS 

Registered Voters, December 31, 1967 1,456 

Voted at Annual Town Meeting, February 20, 1967 875 

Special Town Meetings in 1967 1 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



32 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 

MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

October 3, 1967 

ARTICLES AND VOTES UNDER SAME 



Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Hatfield, Massachu- 
setts, to sell the following items at a public or private 
auction on such terms they deem advisable or take any- 
other action relative thereto: Dodge Panel Truck, Stu de- 
baker Pickup, Ford Station Wagon, American LaFrance 
Fire Truck, Cadillac Ambulance, Chevrolet Panel Truck, 
1 Electric Blower, 2 Flat Body Trucks, 2 Tents, 1 Platform 
Scale, 4 Leveling Jacks, Copper Eaves Spouts, 1 Oven 
(Stove) and 5 sets of wooden doors. 

Article 1. Voted to authorize the Board of Select- 
men of the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts, to sell the 
following items at a public or private auction on such 
terms as they deem advisable ; Dodge Panel Truck, Stude- 
baker Pickup, Ford Station Wagon, American LaFrance 
Fire Truck, Cadillac Ambulance, Chevrolet Panel Truck, 
1 Electric Blower, 2 Flat Body Trucks, 2 Tents, 1 Platform 
Scale, 4 Leveling Jacks, Copper Eaves Spouts, 1 Oven 
(Stove) and 5 sets of wooden doors. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to designate 
as a site for a sewer treatment plant for the Bradstreet 
area that land lying to the west of North Main Street and 
about 700 feet south of Bradstreet being land now or for- 
merly of Margaret Connelly and Irene Clasen, and of Lu- 
ther Belden, Inc. a tract of about three acres, or take any 
action relative thereto. 



33 



Article 2. Voted to designate as a site for a sewer 
treatment plant for the Bradstreet area that land lying 
to the west of North Main Street and about 700 feet south 
of Bradstreet being land now or formerly of Margaret 
Connelly and Irene Clasen and of Luther Belden, Inc., a 
tract of about three acres. 

Article 3. To see what action the Town will take to ap- 
propriate a sum of $600.00 from the Sewer Revenue Re- 
serve Fund (Sewer Available Surplus) for the survey and 
appraisal of lands to be acquired for the site designated in 
Article 2 for a sewer treatment site for the Bradstreet 
area or take any action relative thereto. 

Article 3. Voted to appropriate the sum of $600.00 
from the Sewer Revenue Reserve Fund (Sewer Available 
Surplus) for the survey and appraisal of lands to be ac- 
quired for the site designated in Article 2 for a Sewer 
treatment site for the Bradstreet area. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate the sum of $3,500.00 for the cleaning, repairing and 
improving of the Elm Street Sewage Disposal System and 
determine whether this sum should be appropriated from 
the Sewer Revenue Reserve Fund (Sewer Available Sur- 
plus) or from Surplus Revenue, or take any action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Article 4. Voted to appropriate the sum of $3,500.00 
from the Sewer Revenue Reserve Fund (Sewer Available 
Surplus) for the cleaning, repairing and improving of the 
Elm Street Sewage Disposal System. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate the sum of $3,000.00 from Water Available Surplus, 
said sum to be added to the sum of $18,000.00 appro - 

34 



priated from Water Available Surplus and the sum of 
$20,000.00 borrowed under vote of Article 19 of the An- 
nual Town Meeting held in February and used for the pur- 
pose of the installation of a twelve unit water main from 
a point commencing at the Donnis Saw Mill on Linseed 
Road and thence running in an easterly direction along 
Linseed Road and across Routes 5 and 10 to Bridge Street 
and thence continuing along Bridge Street across U. S. 91 
to the intersection of Bridge Street and Dwight Street and 
thence turning and running in a southerly direction along 
Dwight Street to the northerly side of Elm Street the 
terminal point being the intersection of Dwight and Elm 
Streets, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 5. Voted to appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 
from Water Available Surplus, said sum to be added to 
the sum of $18,000.00 appropriated from Water Available 
Surplus and the sum of $20,000.00 borrowed under vote 
of Article 19 of the Annual Town Meeting held in Febru- 
ary and used for the purpose of the installation of a twelve 
unit water main from a point commencing at the Donnis 
Saw Mill on Linseed Road and thence running in an east- 
erly direction along Linseed Road and across Routes 5 and 
10 to Bridge Street and thence continuing along Bridge 
Street across U. S. 91 to the intersection of Bridge and 
Dwight Street and thence turning and running in a south- 
erly direction along Dwight Street to the northerly side 
of Elm Street, the terminal point being the intersecion of 
Dwight with Elm Street. 

Article 6. To see if the. Town will provide drainage 
for the area of North Prospect Street and Chestnut Street. 
(By Petition) . 

Article 6. On motion of Daniel Zagranic to discuss 
drainage in the area of North Prospect and Chestnut 
Streets, discussion followed. 



35 



Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to purchase 
or take by eminent domain in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 79 of the General Laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, as amended, that tract of land, 
containing- seven hundred forty-seven (747) square feet 
situated on the northerly side of Chestnut Street in the 
Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts, belonging to Joseph J. 
and Agnes R. Wendlowski, hereinafter described, and to 
see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $100.00 
from Surplus Revenue for said purpose or take any action 
relative thereto. 



Article 7. Voted to take no Action on Article 7. 



Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to change the 
designated site for a proposed sewage treatment plant 
from that land situated between the Town Dike and the 
Connecticut River comprising all or portions of land now 
or formerly of the Town of Hatfield, John Pelis and Ed- 
ward Tobacco constituting of approximately ten acres, to 
that tract of land situated between the Town Dike and 
the Connecticut River located between a point about 2,080 
feet south of Bridge Lane to a point 3,360 feet south of 
Bridge Lane, comprising land now or formerly of Edward 
A. and Stella H. Tobacco, Philip J. and Rose M. Monsko, 
Anela Kabat,. Frank and Katie Zagrodnik, Mary Kempisty, 
William H. Dickinson, Charles J. Eberlein, Sr., Thaddeus 
and Helen Kabat, Ernest and Rachel L. Brissette, Victor 
S. and Helen K. Guzowski, Henry D. and Lena M. Deslippe 
and Joseph and Loretta Kabat or take any action relative 
thereto. 



Article 8. Voted to change the designated site for 
a proposed sewage treatment plant from that land situ- 
ated between the Town Dike and the Connecticut River 
comprising all or portions of land now or formerly of 

36 



the Town of Hatfield, John Pelis, and Edward Tobacco, 
consisting* of approximately ten acres, to that tract of land 
situated between the Town Dike and the Connecticut River 
located between a point about 2,080 feet south of Bridge 
Lane to a point 3,360 feet south of Bridge Lane, compris- 
ing land now or formerly of Edward A. and Stella H. To- 
bacco, Philip J. and Rose M. Monsko, Anela Rabat, Frank 
and Katie Zagrodnik, Mary Kempisty, William H. Dickin- 
son, Charles J. Eberlein, Sr., Thaddeus and Helen Rabat, 
Ernest J. and Rachel L. Brissette, Victor S. and Helen R. 
Guzowski, Henry D. and Lena M. Deslippe and Joseph 
and Loretta Rabat. Yes 21 No 10 



Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $500.00 voted under Article 5 of the Special 
Town Meeting of September 29, 1964, for the appraisal of 
land for the sewage treatment site designated under the 
vote of Article 4 of said aforementioned Special Town 
Meeting to be used for the appraisal of land designated as 
the sewage treatment site under vote of preceding Article. 



Article 9. Voted to transfer the sum of $500.00 
voted under Article 5 of the Special Town Meeting of 
September 29, 1964, for the appraisal of land for the sew- 
age treatment site designated under the vote of Article 4 
of said aforementioned Special Town Meeting to be used 
for the appraisal of land designated as the sewage treat- 
ment site under vote of preceding Article. 



Article 10. To see if the Town will vote an addi- 
tional sum of $900.00 to be taken from the Sewer Revenue 
Reserve Fund for the appraisal of land sought to be pur- 
chased or taken by eminent domain proceedings for the 
proposed sewer treatment plant designated by vote of this 
Town Meeting, under Article 8. 



Article 10. Voted to appropriate an additional sum 
of $900.00 to be taken from the Sewer Revenue Reserve 
Fund (Sewer Available Surplus) for the appraisal of land 
sought to be purchased or taken by eminent domain pro- 
ceedings for the proposed sewer treatment plant desig- 
nated by vote of this Town Meeting under Article 8. 

Voted to dissolve the meeting. 



Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



38 



Visiting Nurse Association 



HATFIELD VISITING NURSE 
EXPENSES AND RECEIPTS FOR 1967 

Balance as of January 1, 1967 $ 371.75 

Receipts : 



From Visiting Nurse 


264.00 




From Town of Hatfield 


2,500.00 




State Withholding 


1.80 




Total Receipts for 1967 


$ 


3,137.55 


Expenses: 

Nursed Salary- 


$2,600.00 




Mileage 


117.45 




Social Security 


114.40 




Clerk 


40.00 




Total Expenses for 1967 


$ 


2,871.85 


Balance as of January 1, 1968 


$ 


265.70 



39 



Report of the Fire Department 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

I wish to submit my fourth annual report of the Fire 
Department. 

The new fire truck which was delivered on January 
4, 1967 proved itself to be very good only four days after 
delivery at a house fire. 

The new truck and two-way radios are in good work- 
ing order and are a great help to us many times. 

I want to thank all firefighters for their cooperation 
in the past year. 

I would also like to thank the citizens for keeping the 
fires down as much as they did. 

During the past year the fire trucks were called out 
46 times which are as follows : 



Mutual Aid 


1 


Washing Machine 


2 


Gas 


1 


Tool Shed 


1 


Bulldozer 


1 


Tree Stump 


1 


Car 


5 


Grass Fires 


17 



40 



Tobacco Sheds 

House Fires 

Dump 

Wash Gas off road 

Cheese Cloth 

Oil Burner 

Scout Camp 

Broken Oil Line 

Woods 

Tires on road 

Recisitator Needed 



2 

1 

46 



There were 155 out-door burning permits, 12 oil 
burner permits and 2 blasting permits issued in 1967. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MYRONJ.SIKORSKI 

Fire Chief 



41 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

I wish to submit my report for the year 1967. 

Due to strong winds at times during the past year, 
it was necessary to do more pruning and trimming. Wind 
damage and breakage was much greater than usual. 

Pruning and trimming was done in the most hazard- 
ous areas of Elm St., North Hatfield Rd., School St., Main 
St., Maple St., North St., Prospect St., Porter Ave., Chest- 
nut St., South St., Dwight St., Gore Ave., and Bradstreet 
Depot Rd. 

Thirty-seven stumps were removed, loamed over and 
seeded. 

Thirteen trees infected with Dutch Elm disease were 
taken down and burned. 

Eighteen other trees were taken down: hazardous, 
wood decay or wind damage. 

Some assistance was given on some of these trees by 
the Utility Companies, where power lines were involved. 

Tree Removals were as follows : 

Main St., 7 Elms, 1 Maple, 1 Birch 
Elm St., 1 Elm, 2 Maples 
Bridge St., 1 Pine 
West St., 1 Elm 

42 



Dwight St., 1 Elm 

Chestnut St., 1 Elm, 1 Maple 

North St., 1 Elm 

Prospect St., 2 Elms, 1 Catalpa 

Mountain Rd., 1 Ash 

School St., 1 Elm 

North Hatfield Rd., 1 Elm 

Bradstreet Depot Rd., 5 Elms 

Pleasant View Dr., 1 Elm 

Removed by Cemetery Commission : 
Main St. Cemetery, 1 Maple 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCIS E.GODIN 

Tree Warden 



43 



Library Report 



To the Trustees of the Public Library 
and to the Citizens of Hatfield : 



I herewith submit this eighth annual report as 
Librarian of Hatfield : 

The library report for the year ending December 31, 
1967 shows a circulation of 32,966 books and periodicals. 

The circulation was as follows : 

Juvenile fiction 12,822 

Juvenile non-fiction 5,713 

Adult fiction 10,050 

Adult non-fiction 4,381 

We also borrowed 484 books from interlibrary loan 
through Forbes Library for reference purposes. The ma- 
jority of these books were borrowed for high school and 
college students. The privilege of borrowing any type 
book is available to all citizens of Hatfield. 

During the year 1,929 books from the State Book- 
mobile were circulated in our town. This year showed a 
marked increase in the use of our reading and study room. 

666 books were added to the library. At this time I 
wish to thank all the townspeople who so generously do- 
nated books and periodicals to the library. 

44 



Two historical maps are now on display in our li- 
brary. These maps were framed through the generous 
contribution of Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Cole, Jr. 

With the co-operation of the teachers we had another 
poster and essay contest during National Library Week. 
Prizes were given to the student who had the best poster 
and essay. During this week we also had a display of art 
work done by some of the students and townspeople. 

Our story tellers this year were Mrs. Rita Prew, Mrs. 
Alice Johnson, Mrs. Lura Bieda, Gail Fitzgerald, Mrs. 
Dorothy Polhemus, and Peggy Myron. I wish to thank 
them for making our library hours more enjoyable. 

The Women's Endeavor and Hatfield Book Club met 
at the library for a combined evening meeting. Mr. Mor- 
row, Library Director at Mout Hermon, spoke on the best 
seller list of today and thirty years ago. 

Again we thank the Hatfield Book Club for their con- 
tinued interest shown in the library. During the summer 
they sponsored another summer reading program. These 
reading programs stimulate an interest in summer read- 
ing as shown by the circulation figures at that time. Pins, 
certificates and prizes were given out and a movie was 
shown at the completion of the program. The Book Club 
also gave a donation of money which was used to buy 24 
new chudren's books. 

Another package of long playing masterworks were 
received from CBS. These records can be borrowed by 
adults only. CK 

Because of the unusually damp summer the trustees 
approved the purchase of a dehumidifier for the cellar. 
A cabinet to store our supplies and books to be mended 

45 



was also approved. During the spring the roof and sky- 
light were repaired. 

To Mrs. Helen M. Osley, Mrs. Doris Vollinger, The 
Trustees and teachers I wish to express my sincere appre- 
ciation for their co-operation and assistance during the 
year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. CANTWELL 

Librarian 



4fi 



Police Report 



I respectfully submit the report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1967. Also the 
number of arrests in the Town of Hatfield is included : 

Assault and Battery 1 

Operating as to endanger 2 

Leaving the scene of an accident 1 

Operating without license 1 

Failing to stop for police officer 1 

Motor Vehicles equipment tags 6 

Operating motor vehicle without authority 1 

Operating motor vehicle on sidewalk 1 

Disturbing the peace 2 

Delinquent child 2 

Speeding 5 

Registry action 3 

Drunkenness 4 

State Institutions 1 

Accidents investigated 28 

Warrants served 2 

Summons served 47 

Ambulance trips 33 
All committed dog taxes collected 



Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY J. SLIWOSKI 

Chief of Police 

47 



Report of Water Commissioners 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 



The Water Department enjoyed one of their better 
years in 1967. Dry weather conditions in the past years 
were supplemented by a normal season this year, and we 
were able to supply all the necessary water needed for our 
community, with the exception of one week, when we 
were forced to operate our well. 

The new twelve inch line from the Donnis Saw Mill 
along Linseed Road, Bridge Street and Dwight Street was 
installed by the Was Bros. Construction Company of 
Ware, Mass., who were low bidder for the project. All 
house connections were transferred to the new line by the 
Water Department. 

Due to weather conditions and late completion of lay- 
ing this line, there is some grading, seeding and blacktop 
work to be done this coming spring as soon as weather 
conditions permit same to be done. This line is a great 
asset to the water system of this town, as well as the peo- 
ple on Linseed Road, who were without fire protection for 
a good many years. 

As of this writing, the Engineering firm of Tighe & 
Bond were making test borings for a dam site on the pro- 
posed new supply for the Town of Hatfield. We have not 
heard of their findings as yet. 

In closing, we wish to thank every one of you towns- 
people who have helped us to make this a successful year, 

48 



and hope to have your full cooperation in the future years 
to come. 



We remain your Water Commissioners : 

RALPH F. VOLLINGER, Chm. 
RUPERT HARUBIN, Sec. 
JOHN RUDY 



49 



School Building Committee Report 



On March 16, 1967, the School Building Committee 
at a conference with the staff of the Department of Educa- 
tion presented the following brief of the Hatfield school 
resolve. 

On February 18, 1963, at the Annual town meeting, 
the voters of Hatfield saw fit to appoint a School Building 
Needs Committee. 

On January 15, 1964, the Needs Committee surveys 
of school plant needs and the committee reports were filled 
with the MSB AC for approval. 

At the February 1964, town meeting the School Build- 
ing Needs Committee report was accepted as approved by 
the MSBAC and a School Building Committee was elected 
by the voters of the town. This committee used the Needs 
Committee surveys and reports as guide lines and con- 
cluded the housing problems were in grades 9-12. 

All possibilities of joining and/or forming a regional 
system were explored and conferences were held with the 
MSBAC. It was further agreed that a complete new 
school with all facilities was the best possible solution. 

Site surveys were conducted and in December, 1964, 
at a special town meeting, it was voted not to designate a 
site for a new school. The Building Committee was in- 
structed to conduct a survey of the feasibility of an addi- 
tion to the present Smith Academy and prepare cost esti- 
mates and present same to the townspeople at a later date. 

50 



At the special town meeting held October 8, 1965, the 
School Building Committee presented preliminary draw- 
ings and cost estimates of a proposed addition to Smith 
Academy with no state aid. This proposal was voted down. 

At the Annual Town Meeting held February, 1966, 
the town empowered the School Building Committee to 
draw preliminary plans and cost estimates for the con- 
struction of a complete new high school on property desig- 
nated as the Blauvelt property and such adjacent land as 
needed and provided funds for same. 

On May 4, 1966, the School Building Committee for- 
warded to the MSBAC, schematic drawings of the pro- 
posed high school and together with property plans 
topography maps, educational specifications and projected 
enrollment data. 

At the preliminary plans conference held on May 18, 
1966, with the MSBAC we were informed that our school 
problem would be forwarded to the newly formed Board 
of Education for discussion and approval. 

As of October, 1966, we were informed to contact Mr. 
Roland Duval, a regional co-ordinator of the Pittsfield 
Branch of The Department of Education, for a meeting 
to discuss the problem. On October 31, 1966, at our meet- 
ing with Mr. Duval, the School Building Committee in- 
formed Mr. Duval about all that transpired from 1963 to 
date. Also he was given all necessary materials pertinent 
to our school problem, and a tour of our school buildings, 
site, and community building projects in preparation for 
the November meeting of the Board of Education. 

In December, 1966, the School Building Committee 
was required to get a formal decision on the possibility of 
joining the Frontier Regional system. Copies of the Fron- 
tier Regional decision not to accept Hatfield into the sys- 
tem were sent to the proper authorities. 

51 



Finally, no way presently exists for Hatfield to join 
a regional system, and no attempts have been made to 
deceive the State Department. 

There is enough data on file supporting the urgency 
of our school problem. 

A general discussion was held and at the conclusion 
it was felt that all was in accord and that a decision would 
be forthcoming in the near future. 

After many telephone calls and letters regarding ap- 
proval of our school construction and inaction and in- 
decision on the part of the decision makers, we were in- 
formed on August 24, 1967, that the Board of Education 
at a special meeting held at Springfield on August 22, 1967, 
voted unanimously to accept the recommendation of the 
Advisory Committee on Unions and Regions of the State 
Department of Education that the Hatfield and Conway 
petitions for school facilities be considered as one, with 
the following determination. 

The towns presently in Union 38 (Conway, Deerfield, 
Sunderland, and Whately), the town of Hatfield, and the 
Frontier Regional School District should join together to 
form one K-12 regional organization. 

On October 10, 1967, at a meeting held in South 
Deerfield, the Staff of the Department of Education pre- 
sented a proposed regional complex to the school commit- 
tees of the concerned communities of the Frontier Re- 
gional System, and representative groups of Hatfield, 
(the School Committee, the School Building Committee, 
the Board of Selectmen, the Board of Assessors, officers of 
the Parent-Teacher council, and other interested citizens.) 

Under the State proposal, the new Hatfield Elemen- 
tary school would be used to house the K-3 grade children 

52 



from Hatfield and Whately. The 475 children of grades 
4-12 would be sent to an expanded Frontier system to be 
constructed by the proposed new region. The estimated 
cost of new construction is $4,000,000.00 of which 42.57% 
being Hatfield's share. Hatfield would also bare a prorated 
share of the outstanding debt, and would have to buy its 
share of the facilities outside of the indebtness of the 
present Regional system. Hatfield would realize some 
compensation for the use of Elementary School in the Re- 
gional proposal. 

The Frontier Regional committees and the member 
communities school committees voted against the state 
proposal and the acceptance of Hatfield. 

The renewed efforts of the School Building Commit- 
tee, Board of Selectmen, and Town Council in seeking 
approval of local construction, again met with delay and 
referral to further studies and adjustments in cost analy- 
sis by the Department of Education for organizing an 
expanded Regional System. 

On January 4, 1968, Mr. Thomas White, Regional co- 
ordinator of the Pittsfield Branch of the Department of 
Education presented a revised analysis of the State's pro- 
posal to the Hatfield School Committee, School Building 
Committee, and other town officials. 

The Hatfield School Building Committee has also been 
in touch with surrounding communities for possible re- 
gionalization but has not met with any success. 

Due to the fact that the Hatfield School Building 
Committee finds it is improbable that Hatfield could re- 
gionalize in the near future and that secondary facilities 
are needed immediately, the HSBC has contacted Senator 
Barrus to introduce legislature for approval of state aid 
for construction of a high school in Hatfield. This is the 

53 



only alternative left and for the good of the community 
and its students the HSBC recommends the town support 
this proposal. 

It is with regret that the School Building Committee 
cannot submit a more positive or favorable report in re- 
solving the town school problem. 

The School Building Committee extends its thanks 
to the Board of Selectmen, Town Council, Board of Asses- 
sors, the School Committee, Senator Barrus, Rep. Madsen 
for their cooperation, efforts, and assistance. 



Respectfully submitted, 

THADDEUS RABAT, Chm. 
JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI, Sec. 
RICHARD BELDEN 
MRS. ETHEL BYRNE 
WILLIAM H. BURKE, JR. 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
WILLIAM S. OLSZEWSKI 
JOSEPH V. PORAD A, JR. 
EUGENE F. PROULX 
RAYMOND RUSSELL 
STANLEY SLIWOSKI 

School Building Committee 



54 



Recreation Commission 



The Hatfield Youth League during 1967 completed 
its eighth successful year of operation, namely in baseball 
and basketball. 

In April, the annual registration for baseball was held 
and approximately eighty boys were signed up to play. 
The players were screened and the varsity team selected 
first and represented Hatfield in the Frontier Youth 
League. The remaining players were divided into four 
teams and played intramural games for two rounds or 
six weeks. 

The Hatfield varsity team again participated with 
five other towns in the Frontier Youth League, namely, 
Conway, Old Deerfield, South Deerfield, Sunderland and 
Whately. The team was runner-up in the first half of 
league play and won the second round. In a playoff series 
with South Deerfield, the Hatfield team won the champion- 
ship and was awarded that trophy at the annual league 
banquet. Since the present Hatfield group organized and 
entered in the league in 1960, it has been under the 
tutelage of James Mullins, Sr. and the past five seasons 
has been assisted by Kenneth Balise. The eight year rec- 
ord of the team now stands at four championships, three 
as runner-up and once in fourth place. 

All players from the six local teams were treated by 
a trip to a Pittsfield Red Sox game and the varsities to a 
Boston Red Sox game. All players were also treated to a 
picnic at the Center School diamond and chaperoned by 
officers and coaches. 



55 



Hatfield also participated again for the second year 
in the Pioneer Valley Teen League. Other teams partici- 
pating were from Hadley, North Hadley and Southamp- 
ton. This team was again coached by Americo "Zip" 
Zerneri and assisted by Fred Hanks and for the second 
year in a row, won the championship. A dinner honoring 
this group is being planned. 

With the arrival of November, basketball registration 
was held with approximately eighty youths registering. 
This is the largest number ever to sign up for basketball 
and also brought up the problem of an extra gym. The 
players were again divided into two groups, namely 
Grades 3 through 5 and Grades 6 through 8. At present 
there are five teams in the younger group and four teams 
in the older group. 

For the first time, an area basketball league was or- 
ganized in October under the auspices of the Pioneer Val- 
ley Teen League. This is for Grades 5 and 6 and towns or 
schools participating are Hadley, Amherst, Southampton, 
St. Michael's and Hatfield. This is a ten game slate league. 
Games are played on Saturday afternoons with various 
coaches assisting. 

Because of the continuing conflict of baseball dia- 
monds and rearrangement of games, the Youth League re- 
quested and was granted land by the Hatfield School Com- 
mittee. The land is behind the new Elementary School 
and down at the further end. Several work parties were 
held in getting the diamond prepared and seeded. Further 
work parties will be held in the spring to prepare it for 
the coming season. 

We would like to express our thanks to the Public 
Highway Department, Fire Department and Police De- 
partment for their work and cooperation in building the 
community skating rink and look forward to their co- 
operation in the future. 

56 



We wish to repeat our annual appeal that in order 
for these activities to be continued successfully, coaches 
and helpers in both sports are always needed. We would 
also like to thank all those who have assisted in the past. 

We would also like to express our deep gratitude to 
all groups and individuals for their help and support in 
the past and look forward to their continued help and sup- 
port in the future. 



Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY P. BETSOLD, Chm. 
BERNARD J. KOSIOR, Vice Chm. 
THOMAS P. MULLINS, Treas. 
JAMES M. MULLINS, SR. 
KENNETH R.BALISE 



57 



Sewer Commissioners' Report 



In April of 1967, the Sewer Commission went to 
Boston for hearings before the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Health to obtain the necessary approvals of an 
adequate sewerage treatment site outside the dike off 
South Street. After this was approved, we were informed 
by a new agency, the Department of Natural Resources, 
that our whole approach was all wrong and we should 
start over again with a more expensive solution. At the 
present time, our protests have not been clearly answered 
and we are still awaiting some clear-cut ruling to proceed 
upon. The monies sought at the Special Town Meeting 
for this site have not been spent. 

We have not proceeded with the site in Bradstreet 
for substantially the same reasons. We hope to qualify 
for some state-aid funds on this project and will wait for 
the ground rules to be declared before we commit our- 
selves. 



The work at the Elm Street leaching field is substan- 
tially complete and the permit for the Multicolor Corpora- 
tion sewer entrance on Elm Street was granted in Decem- 
ber. 



We are seeking a better piece of equipment for clear- 
ing the sewers at the next Town meeting. The present 
gear is too small for the frequent blocks in our many flat 
gradient sewer lines. There have been many injuries to 
personnel using the old machine and too much time is 
consumed trying to do the job with the present tools. 



58 



We are also seeking salaries for the Commission. The 
members have been contributing their efforts since the 
Commission was created and feel that some compensation 
is necessary due to the increasing demands on their time. 



Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD W. DRURY, Chm. 
JOHN A. BETSOLD 
FRANCIS H. HEBERT 

Sewer Commissioners 



39 



Board of Appeals Report 



The Board holds regular meetings on the first 
Wednesday of each month at 7 : 00 P.M. at the Town Hall. 

Public hearings on petitions for variances, special 
permits, and appeals are scheduled as needed. 



Petition to the board shall be in the form of a letter 
(forms available at the Town Hall) to the Board contain- 
ing the purpose of subject matter of request, the name 
and address of the owner of the property which is the sub- 
ject matter of the petition; and a list of the names and 
addresses of all the owners of the property adjoining the 
affected premises and all the owners of all property with- 
in a distance of two hundred feet of any boundary of the 
premises affected as they appear on the most recent tax 
list and shall be accompanied by a legal description of the 
affected premises showing the location, dimensions, and 
area of the lot (copy of deed or deeds shall suffice but shall 
not necessarily be limited thereto) and a sketch or plan 
showing the location, dimensions, and distance from the 
boundary lines of all structures erected and to be erected 
on the lot. 



Each petition shall be accompanied by a filing fee of 
ten dollars. 



The Board of Appeals has held seven public hearings 
during 1967. 



60 



It is the intent of the Board to render decisions where 
desirable relief may be granted without detriment to the 
public good and without substantially changing the intent 
of the zoning by laws of the town of Hatfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 



THADDEUS RABAT, Chm. 
LEON MAXIMOWSKI, Clk. 
ROBERT POLHEMUS 
WILLIAM BOYLE, Alt. 
HAROLD LYMAN, Alt. 

Board of Appeals 



61 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1967 



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68 



Report of Town Accountant 



RECEIPTS 




GENERAL REVENUE 


Taxes: 




Personal 1967 


$ 20,221.60 


Real 1967 


273,468.96 


.Trailer 1967 


1,086.00 


Poll Prev. Years 


14.00 


Personal Prev. Years 


1,382.87 


Real Prev. Years 


57,060.74 


In Lieu of Taxes Prev. Years \ 


126.50 

$ 


Motor Vehicle Excise: V? 




Levy of 1967 


$ 54,694.00 


t; Previous Years 


15,814.16 



Farm Animal & Machinery Excise: 

Levy of 1967 $ 410.00 

Previous Years 70.00 



353,360.67 



70,508.16 



480.00 



Sewer Tax: 
Levy of 1967 
Levy of 1966 


$ 3,710.00 
2,438.50 
2,437.50 


6,147.50 

124,310.16 

* 

6,151.50 
160.00 


Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 
Business Corporation Tax 
Meal Tax 

Chap. 70 G. L. (Schools) 
State Tax Basis 


$ 119.12 

485.48 

34,854.34 

88,851.22 


Licenses and Permits: 
Liquor 
Milk 
Junk 
All Other 


$ 5,800.00 

4.00 

8.00 

339.50 


Court Fines 





69 



RECEIPTS 

Grants from Federal Government: 



Aid to Dependent Children 


$ 1,218.84 




Medical Assistance 


11,496.31 




Old Age Assistance 


4,400.00 




Disability Assistance 


78.82 




Public Law #864 


795.13 




Public Law #874 


7,670.00 




Public Law #89-10 


4,791.00 




Public Law #88-210 


649.00 




School Lunch 


7,791.34 


38,890.44 






Grants from Commonwealth: 






Free Public Library 


$ 587.50 




School Transportation, Chap. 71 


10,864.90 




Vocational Education 


633.00 




Highway Chap. 679, Sec. 5 


4,180.58 




Highway Chap. 81 


12,860.22 


29,126.20 






Grants from Hampshire County: 






Dog Licenses 




132.07 


Dog Disposal 




153.00 


Total General Government 


$ 


629,419.70 


Town Hall 


$ 


45.00 


Board of Appeals 




70.00 


Planning Board 




10.50 


Board of Selectmen — Liquor Ads 




74.50 


Sewer Connections 




500.00 


Police Dept. 




207.00 


Slaughter Fees 




26.75 


Highways: 






Highway Chap. 90 Maint — State 


$ 1,000.00 




Highway Chap. 90 Maint. — County 


1,000.00 




Highway Chap. 90 N. C. — State 


9,000.00 




Highway Chap. 90 N. C. — County 


4,500.00 




Machinery Fund 


2,290.70 




Individuals — Damage 


14.00 


17 RfU 7ft 



70 



RECEIPTS 

Public Welfare: 

General Relief — State $ 95.49 

Aid to Dependent Children — State 434.21 

Old Age Assistance — State 1,001.49 

Medical Assistance — State 6,977.27 

Disability Assistance — State .23 

8,508.69 

Veterans' Benefits 1,031.57 

Schools: 

Athletic Receipts $ 1,865.51 

School Lunch ColL 23,275.25 

Tuition 450.00 

Rent — School St., Migrant Educ. 175.00 

25,765.76 

Library Fines 80.10 

School Construction — Chap. 645 

Acts '48 6,654.55 

Compensation — State Withholding 41.60 

Purchase Treasury Bills 19,944.50 

Water Department: 
Rates $ 23,288.45 

New Services and Misc. 995.94 

24,284.39 

Care of Cemetery Lots 217.00 

General Interest: 

Interest on Taxes $ 5,284.80 

Charges and Fees 2.45 

Interest on M. V. E. Taxes 304.66 

5,591.91 

Water Loan 20,000.00 

Interest on Trust Funds 648.61 



Total Commercial Revenue $ 131,507.13 



AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

Dog Licenses Due County $ 517.50 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 810.00 

Federal Withholding Taxes 34,807.90 



71 



RECEIPTS 

State Withholding Taxes 4,129.63 

Retirement 4,465.06 

Blue Cross 8,028.91 

Teachers' Health & Accident 835.12 

53,594.12 

Refunds 857.29 

Cash on Hand January 1, 1967 233,075.92 



Total $ 1,048,454.16 



• 



PAYMENTS 

Moderator $ 25.00 

Selectmen : 
Salaries 1,500.00 

Clerk 300.00 

Expenses: 

Printing 1 , Postage, Stationery $ 5.55 

Advertisements 100.80 

Dues 54.00 

Travel 97.59 

All Other 10.00 

267.94 



3,175.00 



Accounting: 






Salary- 






Expenses: 






Stationery, Printing, Postage 


* 


163.04 


Dues 


. : - 


5.00 


Treasurer: 






Salary 






Expenses: ., 






Clerical . 


1 


300.00 


Printing, Postage, Stationery 




214.63 


Dues 




4.00 


Surety Bond 




170.00 


Collector: 






Salary 






Expenses: 






Clerical ' ■ • ; 


$ 


504.50 


Printing-, Postage, Stationery 




339.10 


Bond 




321.00 


All Other 




38.50 



168.04 



3,375.00 



688.63 



2,10000 



1,203.10 



73 



PAYMENTS 



Assessors: 
Salary 

Expenses: 
Clerical 

Printing, Postage, Stationery 
Dues 
Travel 
All Other 



2,600.00 



Planning Board: 

Board of Appeals: 

Town Hall: 
Janitor 
Fuel 
Light 

Janitor's Supplies 
Repairs 



200.00 

246.22 

15.00 

21.00 

117.00 



Elector Under Oliver Smith Will 




Town Counsel 




Finance Committee Expense 




Town Clerk: 




Salary 




Expenses: 




Recording 


$ 100.00 


Bond 


10.00 


Clerical 


300.00 


Printing, Postage, Stationery 


122.00 


Dues 


10.00 


Election and Registration: 




Registrars 


$ 184.00 


Election Officers 


182.00 


Clerical 


220.00 


Printing, Postage, Stationery 


216.17 


Street lists 


677.00 



3,449.68 
1,743.02 
1,196.38 
215.42 
1,086.88 



599.22 

10.00 

1,200.00 

15.00 



3,275.00 



542.00 



1,429.17 
55.87 

64.02 



74 



PAYMENTS 

New Equipment 375.00 

Special Hall License 25.00 

All Other 16.20 

8,107.58 

Install New Lighting — Town 

Hall Auditorium 1,545.00 



Total General Government $ 32,245.57 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Police Department: 

Chief $ 3,500.00 

Men 748.88 

Insurance 420.00 

Gas, Oil, etc. 376.30 

Misc. Supplies 70.78 

Repair Two-Way Radio 35.90 

Postage 35.00 

All Other 13.96 

5,200.82 



Fire Department: 




Chief 


$ 450.00 


Clerk 


150.00 


Men 


686.00 


Dues 


10.00 


Fuel 


232.03 


Light 


61.54 


Rent 


360.00 


Hose 


715.76 


Tires 


160.00 


Gas, Oil, Grease, etc. 


126.37 


New Equipment and Supplies 


599.21 


Truck Repairs 


233.81 


Printing 


14.00 


Telephone 


398.50 


All Other 


14.48 



4,211.70 

Purchase New Fire Truck 9,500.00 

Gas Inspector's Salary 200.00 

Moth Work 2,598.80 

75 



PAYMENTS 



Tree Work 
Civil Defense 

Total Public Safety 



2,695.98 
248.65 



$ 24,655.95 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Public Health 


$ 


57.94 




Immunization School Children 




55.00 




Well-Child Clinic 




160.00 




Visiting Nurse 




2,500.00 




Insp. Animals and Slaughter 




300.00 




Sewer Comm. Expense 




103.00 




Repair Elm St. Sewage Disposal 








System 








Labor 


$ 921.60 






Misc. Supplies 


110.24 








$ 


1,031.84 




Total Health and Sanitation 

HIGH 




$ 


4,207.78 


WAYS 


9 


Highway General: 








Wages 


$ 


2,671.40 




Telephone 




183.56 




Fuel 




172.73 




Lights 




61.52 




Rent of Dump 




350.00 




Establishing bound points, Chestnut 






and School Sts. 




457.45 




Misc. Supplies 




31.32 




All Other 




62.00 




Sewer Work — Wages 




439.80 




Sewer Work — Supplies 




145.12 




Snow Removal — Salaries 




4,039.40 




Snow Removal — Sidewalks 




723.00 


9,337.30 








North Street Sidewalk 






999.25 


Street Lights 






6,111.23 


Bridge Repairs 






139.45 


Fence Repairs 






200.00 


Purchase Snow Plow 






800.00 



76 



PAYMENTS 

Highway Chap. 81 : 

Labor $ 12,531.60 

Town Machinery 1,118.50 

Bituminous Concrete, Patch 1,979.92 

Loam and Gravel 1,410.11 

Cluverts 767.65 

Snow Removal — Labor 2,452.60 

Salt 864.67 

Sand 549.95 



Highway Chap. 90 Maintenance: 

Labor $ 1,045.80 

Town Machinery 123.00 

Bituminous Concrete 1,498.20 

Line Paint 333.00 



Highway Chap. 90 New Const.: 

Labor $ 8,155.80 

Machinery 988.00 

Gravel, Sand, Loam, etc. 927.90 

Grates & Frames, Blocks, etc. 1,470.82 

Corrugated Pipe 2,529.67 

Bituminous Concrete 3,742,81 

AU Other 215.35 



Machinery Operating: 

Parts and Repairs $ 2,326.68 

Gas 1,577.26 

Oil, Grease, etc. 167.62 

Tires 150.00 

Miscellaneous 105.38 



21,675.00 



3,000.00 



18,030.35 



4,326.94 



Total Highways $ 64,619.52 



CHARITIES AND VETERANS' BENEFITS 

Public Welfare: 

Salary of Agent $ 3,840.00 

77 



PAYMENTS 

General Relief: 

Printing, Postage, Stationery $ 96.73 
Travel 58.24 
Groceries 360.00 
Medicine & Medical Assist. 180.65 
Cash Aid to Individuals 96.00 


791.62 

968.90 

27,832.05 

4,981.75 


Aid to Dependent Children 
Medical Assistance 
Old Age Assistance 




Total Charities 


$ 


38,414.32 



VETERANS' BENEFITS 



Salary of Agent 

Dues 

Aid 

Medical 

Miscellaneous 



400.00 

5.00 

1,753.73 

1,830.12 

157.90 



SCHOOLS 




Administration : 




Superintendent 


$ 4,500.00 


Clerical 


2,493.50 


Office Expenses 


1,222.93 


Travel 


371.57 


Out-of-State Travel 


207.80 


Instruction: 




Salaries — Teachers 


$185,480.49 


High Principal 


7,450.00 


Elementary Principal 


9,770.96 


Expenses — books, supplies, etc. 


13,234.05 


Co-Operative School Service 


61.50 


Staff Travel 


20.00 



4,146.75 



8,795.80 



216,017.00 



78 



PAYMENTS 






Transportation: 






Transportation of Children 


$ 14,151.53 




School Vehicles — Gas, Oil, etc. 


172.60 




School Vehicles — Maint. 


41.07 


14,365.20 






Athletic Expense 




2,063.34 


Driver Education Expense 




391.85 


Operation: 






Salaries — Janitors 


$ 14,080.16 




Expenses — Heat, Light, Janitor 






Supplies, etc. 


12,840.64 




Repairs 


5,408.55 


32,329.35 






New Equipment 




1,118.54 


Equipment Repairs 




383.32 


Insurance 




468.50 


Nurse's Salary 




3,000.00 


Health Expenses — Supplies, Mileage 




171.9£ 


Total Paid from Town Appropriation 


$ 


279,104.8a 


School Committee Expense 


$ 726.29 




Public Law #864 


851.82 




Public Law #874 


4,057.70 




Public Law #88-210 


649.00 




Public Law #89-10 ESEA '65 


5,450.60 




Athletic Fund 


1,870.72 




School Physician 


600.00 




School Bldg. Comm. Expense 


85.96 




Draw Preliminary Plans and Cost 






Estimate — New High School 


4,000.00 




Vocational Tuition 


16,073.04 




Vocational Transportation 


1,850.00 


36,215.13 







Total Schools 



$ 315,320.02 



SCHOOL LUNCH 



Wages 

Clerk 

Bond 



$ 10,582.80 

1,068.00 

10.00 



79 



PAYMENTS 



Food 

Fuel 

Food Delivery 

Misc. Supplies 

Misc. Equipment 

Equipment Repairs 

Janitor 

All Other 



20,988.32 

62.20 

200.00 

515.53 

79.40 

48.50 

100.00 

45.43 



LIBRARIES 




Librarian 


$ 2,200.00 


Asst. Librarian 


1,829.41 


Janitor Services 


295.50 


Books 


1,882.70 


Periodicals 


44.80 


Binding Books 


49.60 


Fuel and Lights 


450.30 


Repairs 


363.35 


Misc. Supplies & Equipment 


221.83 


Postage and Stationery 


6.10 


All Other 


7.14 

c 



$ 33,700.18 



7,350.73 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Care of Town Clock $ 75.00 

Dog Disposal 136.00 
Lease Part or Entire Bldg. Hdqtrs. 

American Legion 1,000.00 

Memorial Day 389.50 

Outlays 4.50 

Printing & Distributing Town Reports 1,000.00 
Lower Pioneer Valley Regional 

Plan. Comm. 188.00 

Recreation 1,227.29 

Retirement Assessment 6,332.99 

Hampshire County San. Assessment 2,329.70 

Telephone 299.05 

Unclassified 60.55 

Unpaid Bills 5,648.48 



-$ 18,691.06 



80 





PAYMENTS 






INSURANCE 




Town Schedule 




$ 4,183.00 


Liability, Comp. & Coll. 


Vehicles 


1,962.80 


Monies and Securities 




75.00 


Volunteer Firemen 




202.50 


Workmen's Compensation 




2,122.00 


Liability 




829.00 
$ 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Water Commissioners' Salaries 


$ 


Collector's Salary 


$ 819.35 


Clerical 


220.00 


Printing, Postage, Stationery 


91.35 


Bond 


10.00 


Labor 


2,495.25 


Repairs, Gas, Oil 


132.73 


Pipe and Fittings 


2,608.72 


Lights 


362.92 


Chlorine 


414.00 


Care of Chlorinator 


600.00 


All Other 


312.55 

$ 


12" Line — Linseed Rd. & Dwight Street 


Labor 


$ 535.00 


Pipe and Fittings 


26,049.72 


Contract 


12,274.20 


Advertising 


27.30 


Plans and Specifications 


750.00 

$ 



9,374.30 



900.00 



8,066.81 



39,636.22 
Total Water Department $ 48,603.09 



CEMETERIES 

Clerk $ 75.00 

Postage 6.00 

Labor 1,075.00 

Survey 234.58 

All Other 67.88 



-$ 1,458.46 



81 



PAYMENTS 



INTEREST 



Water Loan $ 70.00 

School Loan 9,750.00 

$ 9,820.00 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Water Loan . $ 4,000.00 

School Loan 20,000.00 

24,000.00 





REFUNDS 






Taxes 




$ 


3,667.11 


Motor Vehicle Excise 






2,421.24 


Sewer 






24.00 


All Other 






7.95 

< 



$ 6,120.30 



AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 
State Assessment — M. V. E. Bills $ 274.65 



State Audit Tax 


1,489.19 


State Parks and Reservations 


3,420.64 


County Tax 


31,092.51 


Teachers' Health and Accident 


835.12 


Dog Licenses for County 


517.50 


Cemetery Perpetual Care — New 


810.00 


Cemetery Perpetual Care — Interest 


8.76 


Federal Withholding 


34,807.90 


Retirement 


4,465.06 


State Withholding 


4,129.63 


Blue Cross 


14,396.64 


Insurance 


1,200.76 


Purchase Treasury Bills 


19,944.50 
$ 



117,392.86 

Total Payments $ 760,120.89 

Balance January 1, 1968 288,333.27 

Total $ 1,048,454.16 

82 



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87 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1967 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Ethel I. Byrne, Chairman Term Expires 1969 

Stanley J. Sliwoski, Secretary Term Expires 1970 

Henry F. Kulesza Term Expires 1968 

Regular school committee meetings are held 

at Elementary School 

on the second Tuesday of each month 

or at a time convenient to the member? of 

the school committee. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John A. Skarzynski 
School Office: Home Address: 

High School Building King Street 

Telephone: 247-5614 Hatfield, Mass. 



WORK CERTIFICATES AND SCHOOL CLERK 

Marie P. Sheehan 

57 Chestnut Street 

Office telephone 247-5614 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Robert C. Byrne, M.D. 

83 Main Street 

Telephone 247-5661 

Alfred J. Kaiser, M.D. 

22 School Street 

Telephone 247-5751 

91 



SCHOOL NURSE 

Mrs. Lucille Godek, R.N. 
23 Prospect Street 
Telephone 247-5916 

CORPS OF TEACHERS 1967 - 1968 



Superintendent of Schools and Principal of 
Smith Academy 

John A. Skarzynski 
Driver Education 



Smith Academy 

John H. Naumowicz, Assistant Principal 
English, Humanities 

Florence E. Muller 
Language and Guidance 

Margaret E. Pruzynski 
Commercial 

Mary A. Spakowski 
Home Economics; Biology; Jr. Business Math 

Leonard A. Yarrows 
Math, Science 

Richard J. Sadoski 
Commercial 

Richard M. Cechvala 

English; Math 

Soccer Coach 

Alan C. Copithorne 
Social Studies 



92 



Center School — Junior High 

Grades 7, 8, 9 
Dorothy Breor — Principal 

Jean Kempisty, Assistant Principal 

Grades 7, 8 

Social Studies, Music 

Maxwell Moczulewski — Grade 9 

Math 

High School Basketball Coach 

Joseph F. Savage — Grade 8 

Reading, English 

High School JV Basketball and Jr. High Baseball Coach 

Colleen A. Sirvint — Grade 9 
French 

Richard P. Rost — Grade 7-9 

Science 

Jr. High Basketball Coach 

James A. Devlin — Grade 8 

English, Latin 

Faculty Manager 

Frank E. Abarno — Grade 7 

Social Studies, Math 

Jr. High Soccer Coach 

Coral S. Bissonnette — Grade 7 
English, Reading, Math 

Elementary School 

Dorothy Breor — Principal 

Grade 6 
Frances Celatka Bernadette Wyman 

Grade 5 
Cynthia Tessier Virgina Klaes 

93 



Hilda Fortsch 


Grade 4 


Patricia Klaes 


Ann Labbee 


Grade 3 

Mary Lu Hutchinson 


Eleanor Stenglein 


Grade 2 


Martha Boyle 


Beverly Curtis 


Grade 1 

Rose A. Sarti 
Remedial Reading 


Elaine Nelson 



Supervisors 

Music — Lois Smith 

Penmanship — William Rinehart Co. 

Physical Education — Clyde W. Meyerhoefer 

Custodians 

Elementary — Mitchell Kempisty 

Center School — Chester Celatka 

High School — John Besko 

Transporters 

John W. Maroney — Regular School Transportation 
Frank Skroski, Jr. — Vocational School Transportation 



School Lunch Workers 



Winifred Betsold, Manager 
Wanda Shea 
Bertha Kosakowski 
Mary Winters 



Hazel Roberts, Asst. Mgr. 

Mary Vachula 

Phyllis Kuzontkoski 

Helen Rudy 



94 



Report of the School Committee 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield : 

The function of the school committee is essentially 
legislative and not executive. The school committee rep- 
resents the state and town and is charged with the duties 
of formulating policy and of defining the duties and re- 
sponsibilities of the school staff. They also pass upon the 
larger issues in school administration. 

Keeping abreast of the changes in education has been 
a tremendous challenge. Your school committee has made 
every effort to adopt those changes that seemed both de- 
sirable and beneficial for the pupils of the Hatfield Schools. 

Members of the school committee have been very 
much concerned with the conditions of the high school. 
Their immediate past annual reports brought these con- 
ditions to the citizens of the town. However, this year 
more than ever before, the town of Hatfield must correct 
its secondary school facilities. The New England Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools has voted that 
Smith Academy will lose its Class "A" rating as a high 
school in December of 1969 unless the town takes action 
to correct the physical plant and establish a school library. 
This, in addition to the demands to establish better educa- 
tion by the State Department of Education, will force the 
town to take action. The school committee anxiously 
awaits action on the part of the Hatfield School Building 
Committee to correct the situation because the educational 
opportunities of our students on the secondary level will 
be restricted through any further delays. 

95 



Despite increasing costs affecting all phases of our 
educational program, the school committee has made 
every effort to maintain a sound economical approach and 
has operated within its budget. The consistently rising 
costs of education are nationwide and no town or city can 
avoid them. The school committee has diligently tried to 
improve the educational program and the necessary facili- 
ties with a minimum - increase. The school committee 
wants to attract and to hold capable teachers. It intends 
the salary schedule to be competitive and fair, both to 
the teachers and to the taxpayers. 

The quality of the progress, however, is not entirely 
a matter of money spent, but depends largely on the qual- 
ity and cooperation of all those associated with the school 
system. The school committee gives special appreciation 
to all members of the school department, teachers, secre- 
tary, staff and administrators for giving of their time, ef- 
fort and devotion to the education of Hatfield's future 
generation. 

The new aid to education, the Sales Tax, is a definite 
financial asset to the town. The town also receives reim- 
bursements for transportation, vocational education, and 
through federal grants. 

In reviewing the events which took place during the 
past 12 months, the school committee held 11 regular 
meetings and 6 special meetings during the year. 

A complete list of school personnel can be found in 
another section of this report. In reviewing the teaching 
staff situation, we found several changes took place in 
the school system. 

Mrs. Ruth Myers, resigned, moved to New Jersey. 

Miss Maura Leary, employed in Springfield. 

Mrs. Helen Kostek, leave of absence. 

96 



Mrs. Lura Bieda, resigned, to be at home. 

Mrs. Anne Tierney, resigned, to be at home. 

Mrs. Caroline Brazeau, resigned, to be at home. 

Mrs. Beverly Curtis, elected teacher in Elementary 
School. 

Mrs. Elaine Nelson, elected teacher in Elementary 
School. 

Mrs. Mary Lu Hutchinson, elected teacher in Elemen- 
tary School. 

Mrs. Rose Sarti, elected remedial reading teacher in 
Elementary School. 

Miss Coral Bissonnette, elected teacher in Center Jun- 
ior High School. 

Mrs. Colleen Sirvint, elected teacher in Center Junior 
High School. 

Mr. Alan Copithorne, elected teacher in Smith Acad- 
emy. 

There are presently 29 full time teachers, 2 adminis- 
trators, 2 part time supervisors, one specialist, one school 
nurse, one secretary and 3 custodians on the staff. 

The school committee has spent many hours and has 
given careful study to the budget and believes its request 
is a minimum to operate the school system efficiently and 
successfully in 1968. The Hatfield Finance Committee and 
the School Committee have met and discussed the school 
budget. With the approval of the budget by both bodies, 
the school committee will make every effort to provide an 
adequate educational program. Your attention is directed 
to the financial section which also includes reimburse- 
ments to the town. 

During the year the school committee approved bids 
and made arrangements for public advertising for school 

97 



bus routes, oil, and milk bids. Contracts this past year 
were awarded to the following concerns: the vocational 
school bus transportation to the Skorski Bus Company, 
the oil contract to the Norwood Oil Company for #4 and 
#2 fuel oil and the Brookside Dairy for the school lunch 
milk. The regular school transportation contract is held 
by the Maroney Bus Company and is effective through 
June 1969. 

The school committee has endorsed and supported 
related educational programs for the youth of the town 
including Youth baseball and basketball programs, Boy 
Scouts and sewing clubs. 

Every effort was made to keep our buildings in first 
class condition. Besides the ordinary maintenance car- 
ried out during the year, the following maintenance and 
repair program was carried out. At the elementary school 
corrections were made in the ventilation system, the roof 
was repaired, the cafeteria kitchen and corridors were 
painted, wardrobe doors in 2 rooms were replaced, and 4 
exit doors were replaced. At the junior high school the 
play area was blacktopped, 3 rooms and 3 closets were 
painted and steps and flooring were replaced. The basket- 
ball bleachers were also painted. 

The trustees of Smith Academy carried out necessary 
maintenance and repairs to the building. The roof was 
repaired and slate was replaced, the gutters cleaned and 
repaired, and painting and paneling were done. These re- 
pairs were taken care of without cost to the town. The 
Trustees have been very cooperative in maintaining the 
building and deserve a vote of appreciation. 

The following pieces of new equipment were added 
to the school system: five typewriters, 3 manual and 2 
electric, teacher's desks, dictating machine and prxmobile 
stands, vacuum cleaner and student chairs. 

98 



Through the school offices a great deal of work is 
done to have Hatfield qualify for federal funds. The school 
committee approved federally funded projects under Title 
I and II, 89-10, Vocational and Business Education Act, 
and NDEA Title III and V-A. The school department also 
participated in the Neighborhood Youth Corps program. 
Four youths did a variety of maintenance, repair work 
and general office work during the summer months. The 
salary of the youths was paid by the Federal Government. 
The only cost to the school department was in supervision, 
guidance and maintenance of records. This program is 
also in effect for the school year 1967-68. 

The Hatfield School Committee is generally repre- 
sented at the area as well as the annual state and national 
meetings. 

The school committee wishes to publicly thank the 
following : the Parent-Teacher Council and the Lions Club 
for their generous donations to the school system. 

The committee is pleased to acknowledge the interest 
of the following citizens and civic clubs in the education 
of our students. The following honors are awarded to 
deserving members of the high school graduating class : 

American Legion Post Awards 

Hatfield Book Club Annual Literary Award 

Lions Club Award 

Woman's Endeavor Society Award 

M. Larkin Proulx Award 

Woman's Club of the Holy Trinity Catholic Church 

Award 
Suzanne M. Novak Memorial Award 
The Parent-Teacher Council Awards 
Hatfield Teachers Club Awards 
Hatfield Junior Drum Corps Awards 
Patricia Zembiski Memorial Award 



99 



Both the superintendent's and elementary- junior 
high principal's reports carry a more detailed account of 
the activities of the Hatfield Public Schools. These re- 
ports were read and approved by the school committee and 
your attention is called to them. The committee also di- 
rects your attention to the Hatfield School Building Com- 
mittee report. 

In conclusion, the school committee wishes to express 
its thanks to members of the school department, town 
officers and departments, civic clubs and townspeople for 
their help and assistance in making the school year of 
1967 a rewarding one and looks forward to their continued 
support and assistance. 



Respectfully submitted, 

ETHEL I. BYRNE 
STANLEY J. SLIWOSKI 
HENRY F. KULESZA 



100 



Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and the 
Citizens of Hatfield : 

In accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth 
and the policies of the Hatfield School Committee, I here- 
by submit my tenth annual report as Superintendent of 
Schools of Hatfield. 

We must keep our educational progress in step with 
modem educational practices. We must forget what 
schools were like when we went to them and try to pro- 
vide a program that will prepare our students for the 
future. Educating the pupils of Hatfield will continue to 
cost more money, but I'm sure that you will agree with me 
that one cannot think of anything more important than 
providing the best education possible for your children. 
Education cannot, and should not, be measured in terms 
of the dollar sign. Money should be spent wisely on major 
additions and improvements and these should be sup- 
ported by the town. 

One of the most difficult tasks facing school adminis- 
trations presently is attempting to keep up with the ad- 
vancements and modern trends of teaching techniques, 
materials, equipments, and innovations. Fortunately, the 
staff of the Hatfield Public Schools is willing to extend 
itself to help maintain a modern balanced educational pro- 
gram and to incorporate those new programs that meet 
the needs and requirements of the pupils in our schools. 

The most serious problem facing our educational of- 
ferings and continuing to hamper our effectiveness is the 

101 



lack of space and modern facilities on the secondary level. 
This has reached a point where the quality of our educa- 
tion is being jeopardized. The Hatfield School Building 
Committee has been stymied and is at a standstill. In the 
meantime, construction costs are increasing. We strong- 
ly urge that the situation be decided and corrected, one 
way or another soon. The delay has been most costly not 
only in modern education but also in terms of dollars. In 
addition to this, the New England Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools, the area accreditating association, 
has set a deadline of December 1969 for Hatfield to correct 
its facilities on the secondary level or lose its Class "A" 
rating. 

We have tried to be alert to new and continued fed- 
eral programs for funding education. While we welcome 
these additional funds for support of education, one must 
realize that the complicated applications and detailed 
procedures make the acquisition difficult and tedious; 
many times full amounts cannot be received because of 
lack of funds appropriated, and the record keeping and 
accounting is tremendous. We have applied for those for 
which we knew we were entitled. Among the entitlements 
we have received are the following: Title I PL 89-10, Title 
II PL 89-10, PL 88-210, PL 864, Title III and Title V-A 
and PL 874. 

Whatever success our educational program has 
achieved is the direct result of the dedicated teachers, 
able administrators and cooperative members of the non- 
professional staff. The assistance of the various town de- 
partments and officers, the PTC, Lions Club, Legion and 
Civic organizations has been a source of gratification. 

Many new programs adopted by the State Depart- 
ment of Education from the recommendations of the 
Willis Commission report, have been made compulsory on 
local school systems and many more will be adopted. Al- 

102 



ready implemented are the length of the school day and 
the school year. Kindergarten, physical education, size 
of school systems, staff, teacher-pupil ratio regulations 
will be set in the immediate future. The addition of these 
programs will naturally increase costs, and townspeople 
should be aware of them. 

Supplies and equipment were purchased as needed. 
Maintenance and repairs were made. The textbook re- 
vision program was continued. Practice teachers from 
area colleges were placed in the system. Championship 
teams were had in basketball and soccer. The driver edu- 
cation program was continued. Students in the high 
school took the foUowing tests: CEEB, NMSQT, PS AT, 
IQ, and GATB. Other tests, as needed, were given and 
supervised by the guidance department. Visitations were 
made by many area college representatives. Staff mem- 
bers have attended professional meetings and workshops. 

The school department wishes to bring to your atten- 
tion the reimbursements that are receievd by the town 
on account of education. The 1968 budget has increased 
and the reasons for the increases, other than normal ex- 
penditures are : effects of additional teachers, comparable 
salary schedules, implementation of a kindergarten pro- 
gram, implementation of a partial art program, normal 
inflation, increased enrollments, and progress in curricu- 
lum improvement. Your attention is requested to the ex- 
penses and reimbursements in the financial section. 

This past June, 1967, 56 students were graduated 
from Smith Academy, and of this number 45 have gone on 
to further education. Six students were graduated from 
Smith's Vocational School and 26 were scheduled to return 
in September 1967. 

The rule regarding the entrance of pupils is as fol- 
lows: Any child who attains the age of six during the 

103 



year in which entrance to the first grade is sought may 
attend school beginning in September of that year. For 
example: A child having his sixth birthday on any day, 
including or between January 1, 1968 and December 31, 
1968, may enroll and attend school beginning September 
1968. 

It is the policy of the Hatfield School Department to 
hold regular sessions when it is practicable to operate the 
school buses. Parents are asked to use their own discre- 
tion as to the wisdom of sending their children to school 
on stormy mornings. In the event that it becomes neces- 
sary to cancel school sessions, the "No School Signal' 'will 
be broadcast over radio station WHMP starting at 6 a.m. 
and continuing through 8:30 a.m. The authorities of 
WHMP request that parents not call the radio station for 
this information, but listen for the announcements. 

National Education Week was observed November 
6-10, 1967. Special times were set aside throughout the 
week, for private parent- teacher conferences. The schools 
held open house on Thursday evening of that week. Edu- 
cation Week closed with the showing of the senior high 
school play entitled "The Cannibal Queen" under the di- 
rection of Mr. John Naumowicz of the Smith Academy 
faculty. 

The bus routes were revised in September and the 
routes will be adhered to for the remainder of the year. A 
copy of the present routes follows this report. 

Released time for religious instruction was offered 
again this year. The following times are set aside each 
week so that pupils may benefit from religious intsruction 
in denominations of their own choosing. Released time 
started on September 20, 1967 and will end on May 15, 
1968. 



104 



Wednesday 10:45-11:30 Smith Academy students 
Wednesday 12:45- 1:30 Grades 6, 7, 8, and 9 
Wednesday 1 :50- 2 :40 Grades 2, 3, 4, and 5 

An open-door policy is a vital part of our community- 
centered schools. Our teachers are an integral part of the 
open-door policy and are willing to help any parent. Par- 
ents are invited to visit us and see what and how their 
children learn in the classroom, but are requested to check 
through the principal's office first. 

For a more detailed report about our elementary and 
junior high schools, your attention is directed to Mrs. 
Breor's Principal's Report — also previous school reports, 
especially 1966. 

May I, at this time, extend my appreciation for the 
cooperation and assistance rendered by the members of 
the school committee, to the town departments and towns- 
people, my appreciation for the cooperation which was re- 
ceived toward providing an education in keeping with the 
best interests of the students of Hatfield, and to the school 
department employees, my sincere thanks for their co- 
operation in meeting the educational needs of our children. 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI 

Superintendent of Schools 



105 



Bus Route 



Regular School Bus Schedule 
Elementary 

Run#l 

Bus leaves the high school, up School Street, down 
Prospect Street, up Bridge Street, left on Dwight 
Street, right on Elm Street, turn around at town line, 
back down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down Main 
Street to Elementary School. 

Run #2 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, up Dwight 
Street, up Elm Street, down Main Highway to make 
first pickup, left on Linseed Road to Stoddard resi- 
dence, turn around back down Linseed Road to Main 
Highway, left, down Main Highway to Harubin's 
service station. Bus turns around here, takes right 
at Wolfram's Garage, left down Pantry Road, down 
Main Highway, left at and down Chestnut Street, 
down School Street, down Main Street, to Elementary 
School. 

Run #3 

Bus leaves the high school, to Bradstreet, to Whately 
town line, turns around, back down River Road, right 
at Bradstreet Cafe, to Main Highway, left down 
Prospect Street, down Chestnut Street, down School 
Street to Elementary School. 

106 



Junior and Senior High Schools 

Run#l 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station to Bradstreet, 
to Whately town line, turns around, back down River 
Road, right at Bradstreet Cafe, to Main Highway, 
left down Prospect Street, down Chestnut Street, 
down School Street, to High School. 

Run #2 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, down Bridge 
Street, up Prospect Street, up Chestnut Street, right 
on Main Highway to Wolfram's Garage, left here, and 
left again down Pantry Road, down Main Highway, 
left down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down Main 
Street, to High School. 

Run #3 

Bus leaves Bridge Street station, down Dwight 
Street, down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down 
Main Street, to High School. 

Times 

The buses will start the Junior and Senior High 
School runs at 7:20 and the Elementary runs at 7:55. 
The afternoon runs will start at 2:21 for the Junior 
and Senior High Schools and 2:50 for the Elem- 
tary School. 

Vocational School Bus Run : 

Starting from the Whately-Hatfield town line on 
Route 5, proceeding south on West Street, left down 
Chestnut Street, down School Street, right and down 
Main Street, right and up Maple Street, up Elm 
Street, to Smith's Vocational School. Return will be 
the reverse. 



107 



Principal of the Elementary and 
Junior High Schools 



To the School Committee and the 
Superintendent of Schools : 

I wish to submit this twelfth annual report as prin- 
cipal of the Center Junior High School and the Hatfield 
Elementary School. 

One of the most important changes in the elementary 
school was the departmentalization of the work in grades 
five and six. The four major areas — science, English, 
social studies, and mathematics are taught by individual 
teachers. Reading and the minor studies are taught by 
the homeroom teachers. Of course, we realize there are 
advantages and disadvantages to a departmentalized pro- 
gram, but the administration and the teachers feel the 
advantages are many. 

These children will be oriented into the departmental- 
ized set-up. Therefore, the transition from the elemen- 
tary school to the junior high school will not be so difficult. 
The teachers in each subject will concentrate their efforts 
in a particular study area. This should give them a chance 
to do an in depth study of the subject being taught. The 
classes are held for forty to forty-five minutes each day. 
Shorter periods are provided for the minor areas such as 
art, music, and spelling. 

The pupils have the advantage of studying with dif- 
ferent teaching personalities each day. In the homeroom 
there is a heterogeneous grouping, but once the depart- 
mentalized work begins, the pupils divide into a more 
homogeneous grouping. This enables the instructors to 

108 



provide work that is geared to the ability rating and per- 
formance of each group. 

The Greater Cleveland Social Science Program has 
been adopted. The GCSSP includes all the major disci- 
plines, including geography, history, economics, sociology, 
political science, and anthropology. All of these are 
studied at each grade level as they are essential for the 
resolving of most social science problems. The learner is 
exposed to a growing knowledge of social science concepts, 
techniques, and material which are important to every 
student if he is to take his place as a responsible citizen. 
The GCSSP is based on the principle that our world is in 
an age of great change, specialization, and research. If 
we are to understand this world and its people we must 
concentrate our efforts on all phases of a social science 
problem. 

The federal government has continued its aid to edu- 
cation through its many federal projects from which we 
benefit. This year a great number of library volumes were 
purchased for each classroom. These volumes in the ele- 
mentary and junior high were 100% funded by the federal 
government. 

Our remedial reading project was continued under 
Title I — Public Law 89-10. The federal government 
supervisor for Title I visited the school. He was thorough- 
ly impressed with our project, the materials and equip- 
ment used and the progress being made by the pupils. 
Between 30 and 35 pupils benefit from this program each 
year. The pupils attending this special class are selected 
on the basis of need and performance. The chief purpose 
of the project is to diagnose and analyze each child's read- 
ing problem and then to provide a program that will de- 
velop to a greater degree the reading skills of these pupils 
and to motivate and interest them in reading. 

109 



We have taken advantage of the many services 
offered in the area for our students. Many pupils from 
grades five through twelve participated in the Northamp- 
ton-Smith Summer School. The speech and mental health 
clinics assisted us with our referrals. Our schools belong 
to the University Film Cooperative. From this source 
several audio-visual materials such as sound films are 
secured on a school loan basis. 

Last May ten our School Safety Patrol members were 
fortunate to participate in the Annual School Safety 
Patrol Parade and Assembly in Washington, D. C. These 
members were sponsored by local businesses, charitable 
organizations, and interested citizens. These individuals 
were selected from the results of a qualifying examina- 
tion. The Tri-County Automobile Association sponsored 
the trip. 

The students enjoyed a three day expense-paid trip 
to Washington where they enjoyed sightseeing tours to 
all the places of interest and participated in the school 
patrol parade, which included 25,000 U. S. Safety Patrol 
youngsters. Their headquarters was the beautiful Shera- 
ton-Plaza Hotel. 

Mrs. Lucille Godek, our school nurse; Miss Virginia 
Klaes, a fifth grade teacher; and Inspector Edward 
A. Breor, Jr., head of safety education in the four west- 
ern counties for the Massachusetts Registry of Motor 
Vehicles, were selected as delegates to accompany the 
group. 

We are certainly indebted to them and to the busi- 
nesses, Triple A, charitable organizations, and interested 
citizens that sponsored these patrol members. It was a 
great educational experience for them. 

Throughout the year a school bus or chartered buses 
were available for field trips to Boston, New York City, 

110 



Springfield Museums and the Planetarium, different in- 
dustrial plants, dairies, bakeries, etc. All of these gave 
the children invaluable first- hand experiences. 

Educational television was an important medium used 
to supplement the classroom work in various areas. The 
variety of programs offered at the different levels is nu- 
merous. There are programs in science, social studies, 
language arts, creative dramatics, phonics, music, art, and 
story-telling. Each program is scheduled twice so that 
any class may view these at opportune times. Our four 
portable television sets are on wheels. Therefore, they 
are easily moved to the classrooms. The set in the all- 
purpose room may be viewed by a larger audience. 

The offerings in our physical education program have 
been greatly expanded by the addition of many fine pieces 
of equipment such as the horizontal ladder, spring boards, 
balance boards, etc. With the introduction of these to the 
students, the physical fitness program has become a real- 
ity. The results should be shown in the physical fitness of 
each child participating in the program. 

At the junior high we tried a three-track program 
for the seventh grade students. This enabled us to offer a 
program better suited to the needs of the individual stu- 
dents. By gearing our program to the needs of the stu- 
dents, greater success, better motivation, and more in- 
terest were evident. 

We had to claim the music room for a regular class- 
room, and the south basement room became our music 
room. This arrangement has been a much better arrange- 
ment. 

All the materials used in both schools are up-to-date 
and some of the best. Periodically these are carefully 
evaluated. 



Ill 



In closing may I say to the School Committee, the 
Superintendent of Schools, the staff, the custodians, the 
cafeteria workers, the pupils, and interested citizens, "A 
job well done. Your cooperation, interest, and assistance 
were greatly appreciated throughout the year." 



Respectfully submitted, 

(MRS.) DOROTHY BREOR 

Principal 



112 



School Savings 



The children in the Hatfield schools are associating 
Tuesdays with school banking. 

For several years the three mutual savings banks of 
Northampton and Florence, namely: Florence Savings 
Bank, Nonotuck Savings Bank and Northampton Institu- 
tion for Savings, have sponsored a thrift program within 
the classrooms. 

Children are given bank envelopes on Mondays in 
which to enclose money for Tuseday's banking. On Tues- 
day the envelope is given to the teacher who sends it to 
the principal's office for collection by a bank representa- 
tive. 

Sums starting with 5^ up to any amount may be 
deposited and interest is paid after the accumulation of $3. 

The purpose of the program is to encourage consis- 
tency in saving — banking every week — in the hope of 
establishing the habit. 

Mondays are Club Days at Smith Academy. There 
are two clubs from which to choose — either 50^ or $1 
weekly — for 50 weeks. At the expiration, clubs are paid 
by presenting the paid-up book at the bank. There are no 
definite opening or closing dates for the clubs. They may 
be opened at any time. 

Last school year $14,257.75 was banked in the Hat- 
field school system. 

113 



It is the hope of the sponsors that the parents will 
offer encouragement to the children in order that they 
might adopt the thrift habit on Tuesdays. 

A goal is a worthwhile project and the attainment of 
the goal makes for a feeling of accomplishment. Urge the 
children to select their goal. 



Respectfully submitted, 

(MRS.) V. S. CONNORS 

School Savings Director 



114 



School Health 



To the Superintendent and 
School Committee of Hatfield 



I wish to submit my annual report, the 16th as school 
nurse of Hatfield. 

Good health means more than the negative concept 
of freedom from disease. It is defined as a state of com- 
plete physical, mental and social well-being, not merely 
the absence of disease. Education for health must be 
toward this condition of well-being, toward the highest 
level of health attainable for each individual. It has been 
our intent and desire to assist each child toward this goal, 
through the various school health services which are 
offered, by making each experience educational, informa- 
tional, as well as prophylactic. 

Physical examinations have been completed in grades 
1, 4, 7, 9, and 12, and athletes of grades 8, 10, and 11. We 
are happy to report that the over-weight problem has 
improved considerably. It is gratifying to note that those 
in need of dental correction are at a minimum. 

The Vision test was given to 361 pupils with 36 fail- 
ing the retest. Of this number 25 were seen by an eye 
specialist and received correction, while 11 did not report. 

The Pure Tone hearing test was given to 623 pupils 
with 8 failing the retest. Of this number 5 were seen by 
an ear specialist, while 3 did not report. 

115 



The Tine Tuberculosis test was administered in May 
to children in grades 1, 4, 8, and 12. Of the 154 who took 
the test, there were 4 positive reactors. 

Measles Vaccine was made available free, through 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Heatlh. A clinic 
was held in April and the vaccine was given to 64 students. 

As a prophylactic measure, Flu vaccine was given to 
the faculty, with 28 receiving the Booster dose. 

Communicable Diseases reported during the year 
are as follows : 

Mumps 149 Chicken Pox 39 

Registration of incoming first grade children was 
held in May with 54 reporting. 

Adult Booster for Diphtheria and Tetanus were given 
to 50 seniors. 

The annual census of all children under 16 years of 
age, residing in Hatfield was completed in October, as well 
as the census of the physically handicapped children. 

Governor John Volpe signed into law a requirement 
that all school children must be immunized against small 
pox, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, measles and polio, un- 
less exempted for medical or religious reasons. The law 
became effective on December 4, 1967. A "school child" 
referred to in the law is any student attending public or 
private school from kindergarten through grade eight. 
Notices have been sent to all parents whose children are 
inadequately immunized and they have been requested 
to contact their family physician as soon as possible to 
indicate that they wish to comply with the law. Many 
parents have already responded. 

116 



My sincerest appreciation is extended to the physi- 
cians, school officials, teachers, and parents for their 
assistance and cooperation in the school health program. 



Respectfully submitted, 

LUCILLE H. GODEK, R.N. 



117 



School Lunch 



The two school cafeterias serve an average of 533 
meals a day. They are ably staffed by the following quali- 
fied personnel : Mrs. Winifred Betsold, manager and Mrs. 
Hazel Roberts, assistant manager. Their assistants are 
Mrs. Wanda Shea, Mrs. Bertha Kosakowski, Mrs. Mary 
Vachula, Mrs. Phyllis Kuzontoski, Mrs Mary Winters, 
and Mrs. Helen Rudy. 

Each day the program serves a "Type A" lunch that 
meets the requirements of the National School Lunch Pro- 
gram. This consists of, as a minimum, two ounces cooked, 
lean meat, poultry or fish, or two ounces of cheese; one 
egg or one-half cup cooked dry beans or peas, or four 
tablespoons of peanut butter or an equivalent quantity of 
a combination of two of these items, served in a main dish 
or in a main dish and one other menu item ; three-fourths 
cup serving of two or more vegetables or fruits, or both ; 
one slice enriched bread or the equivalent ; two teaspoons 
butter; one-half pint whole, unnavored milk. No dessert 
is required, but we include one with every hot lunch 
served. Special attention is given to include adequate 
servings of Vitamin C rich food daily and Vitamin A food 
twice a week. With the above, the student gets one-third 
:>f his daily nutritonal requirements. 

The cafeteria personnel once again attended the state 
sponsored School Lunch Conference this year. National 
School Lunch Week was observed in October 1967. 

Equipment and utensils, as needed, have been pur- 
chased for both cafeterias. Maintenance and repair pro- 
grams were also carried out. 

118 



The menus of the school lunch program were pub- 
lished in the daily newspaper and were also posted in the 
classroom. State and Federal Aid in the form of cash 
reimbursements and food donations make it possible to 
offer the hot lunch to students for 25 cents, and the 
amount of food value received for this price is the best 
bargain one can get. The elementary and junior high 
pupils are supervised by the homeroom teachers, with 
over-all supervision by the principal, Mrs. Dorothy Breor. 
The high school students are supervised by the high 
school teachers with over-all supervision by the high 
school principal, Mr. John A. Skarzynski. 

The cafeteria staff should be commended for the 
manner in which they have carried out the lunch program. 
A high percentage of our students participate in the 
program and the quality and variety of food offered is 
excellent. 

The financial account of the lunch program can be 
found in the town accountant's report which appears in 
another section of this town report. 

The following is an accounting of the number of 
lunches served during the past year : 





Days 


No. of 




Lunch Served 


Lunches Served 


January 


21 


11,411 


February 


15 


8,154 


March 


21 


10,905 


April 


15 


7,979 


May 


22 


11,653 


June 


13 


6,662 



119 



September 


18 


9,915 


October 


20 


10,717 


November 


19 


10,068 


December 


15 


7,877 



179 95,341 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI 

Director, Hatfield School Lunch 



120 



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122 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 1967 



Regular Day School 

Regular day school : 

Appropriation for support $279,141.00 

Unexpended balance, returned 

to Surplus Cash 36.11 



Total Expenditures for support $279,104.89 

Expenditures from PL 874 4,057.70 

Expenditures from PL 864 851.82 

Expenditures from PL 89-10 5,455.44 

Expenditures from PL 88-210 649.00 



Total Expenditures $290,118.85 

Credits: Reimbursements to Town of Hatfield 

from Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

General School Fund (Chap. 70) $ 34,854.34 

Transportation 10,864.90 

Sales Tax 88,851.22 



Total reimbursement for regular day school 

to Town of Hatfield from Commonwealth $134,570.46 

Credits: Reimbursement to School Committee 
from Federal Government : 
Federal Law — PL 874 $ 7,670.00 

Federal Law — PL 864 795.13 

Federal Law — PL 89-10 4,791.00 

Federal Law — PL 88-210 649.00 



Total reimbursement to School Committee 

received from Federal Government $ 13,905.13 

123 



Vocational Tuition and Transportation 

Vocational Tuition and Transportation: 

Appropriation for support $ 23,000.00 

Unexpended balance, returned 

to Surplus Cash 5,076.96 



Total support $ 17,923.04 

Credits: Reimbursement to Town of Hatfiield 
from Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
Vocational Tuition and Transportation: 
Vocational Transportation $ 633.00 

Total reimbursement for Vocational Tuition 
and Transportation to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth $ 633.00 



124 



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125 



HATFIELD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL BUDGET ESTIMATE 

1968 



Function: 




1000 


Administration 


$ 9,540.00 


2000 


Instruction 


264,861.00 


3000 


Other School Services 


21,430.00 


4000 


Operation & Maintenance of Plant 


36,554.00 


5000 


Fixed Charges 


515.00 


7000 


Acquisition of Equipment 
Unclassified — Special Class Tuition 


6,000.00 




and Transportation 
TOTAL BUDGET ESTIMATE 


1,000.00 




$339,900.00 



1968 BUDGET ESTIMATE 



Administration — 1000 



Superintendent's Salary $ 


4,900.00 


Superintendent's Clerk 


3,060.00 


Substitute Clerk 


200.00 


Census 


100.00 


Superintendent's Office Expense 


260.00 


Superintendent's Expenses 


350.00 


Superintendent's Out of State Travel 


600.00 


Co-operative School Service Center 


70.00 


Total 


$ 9,540.00 



126 



Instruction — 2000 

Elementary Principal's Salary $ 7,287.00 

Elementary Office Expenses 50.00 

Elementary Principal's Expenses 50.00 

Junior High Principal's Salary 3,644.00 

Junior High Office Expenses 50.00 

Junior High Principal's Expenses 50.00 

Secondary Principal's Salary 8,450.00 

Secondary Office Expenses 170.00 

Secondary Principal's Expenses 140.00 

Graduation 340.00 

Research and Development 1,500.00 

Head Start Program 1,500.00 

Title III 500.00 

Music Salary 3,700.00 

Music Salary — Pianist 100.00 

Art Salary 800.00 

Art Supplies 400.00 

Miscellaneous 125.00 

Elementary Salaries 89,430.00 

Kindergarten Salary 2,400.00 

Penmanship 540.00 

Salaries — Handicapped Children 500.00 

Elementary Instructional Supplies 3,500.00 

ETV Membership 275.00 

Kindergarten Instr. Supplies 1,000.00 

Elementary staff travel 200.00 

Out of state — teacher travel 0.00 

Junior High Salaries 60,110.00 

Physical Education 2,200.00 

Junior High Instructional Supplies 2,100.00 

Junior High staff travel 200.00 

Out of state — teacher travel 0.00 

Secondary Salaries 62,670.00 

Secondary Instructional Supplies 2,200.00 

Driver Education 550.00 

Senior High staff travel 200.00 



127 



Out of state — teacher travel 


0.00 


Elementary Textbooks 


1,600.00 


Kindergarten Textbooks 


500.00 


Junior High Textbooks 


1,900.00 


Secondary Textbooks 


1,200.00 


Elementary Library 


200.00 


Junior High Library 


300.00 


Junior High Library Books 


200.00 


Secondary Library 


200.00 


Secondary Library Books 


430.00 


Elementary AVA Aids 


100.00 


Junior High AVA Aids 


100.00 


Secondary AVA Aids 


200.00 


Contracted Services — Guidance 


400.00 


Supplies and Materials 


500.00 


Travel and Meetings 


100.00 


Total 


$264,861.00 



Other School Services — 3000 



Nurse's Salary 


$ 3,300.00 


Health Supplies and Materials 


130.00 


School Nurse's Expenses 


100.00 


Elementary Field Trips 


200.00 


Junior High Field Trips 


200.00 


Secondary Field Trips 


200.00 


Pupil Transportation 


14,700.00 


Bus 


0.00 


Athletic Transportation 


1,200.00 


Police — Athletic Contracted 




Services 


200.00 


Athletic Expenses and Awards 


1,200.00 



Total $ 21,430.00 

128 



Operation and Maintenance of Plant — 4000 



Elementary Custodial Salary $ 


5,600.00 


Kindergarten Custodial Salaries 


400.00 


Elementary Custodial Substitute 


200.00 


Elementary Custodial Supplies 


2,100.00 


Junior High Custodial Salaries 


4,800.00 


Junior High Custodial Substitute 


200.00 


Junior High Custodial Supplies 


1,100.00 


Secondary Custodial Salary 


4,600.00 


Secondary Custodial Substitute 


200.00 


Secondary Custodial Supplies 


650.00 


Town Hall Custodial Supplies 


190.00 


Elementary Fuel 


2,700.00 


Junior High Fuel 


2,000.00 


Secondary Fuel 


1,300.00 


Elementary Electricity 


3,300.00 


Elementary Telephone 


185.00 


Junior High Electricity 


500.00 


Junior High Telephone 


190.00 


Secondary Electricity 


450.00 


Secondary Telephone 


270.00 


Alterations — Unclassified 


100.00 


School Street School Maintenance 




and Repair 


100.00 


Elementary Maintenance and Repair 


2,780.00 


ETV Maintenance 


110.00 


Junior High Maintenance and Repair 


1,579.00 


Secondary Maintenance and Repair 


200.00 


Maintenance, Classroom Typewriters 


350.00 


Maintenance — Reserve 


0.00 


School Vehicles 


400.00 


Total 


$ 36,554.00 



129 



Fixed Charges — 5000 

Liability Insurance $ 60.00 

Athletic Insurance 455.00 

Rental of Land, etc. 0.00 



Total $ 515.00 

Acquisition of Equipment — 7300 

New Equipment $ 5,600.00 



Total $ 5,600.00 



Unclassified 

Special Class Students — Tuition 

and Transportation $ 1,000.00 



Total $ 1,000.00 



Non- Appropriated Federal Funds 
Contractual 

Title II, 89-10 Funds $ 0.00 

Voc. Ed. Act, 1963 PL 88-210 400.00 

Title IH 89-10 Funds 0.00 



Total $ 400.00 



TOTAL BUDGET ESTIMATE $339,900.00 



130 



REIMBURSEMENT — ANTICIPATED 

Transportation Aid, Chap. 71, Sec. 72 $ 10,000.00 

PL-874 — Available and Anticipated 34,000.00 

PL-864 — Available and Anticipated 1,200.00 

Voc. Ed. Act, 1963, PL-88-210 400.00 

State School Aid Chapter 70 — 1968 34,000.00 



Total $ 79,600.00 

Total Appropriation 339,900.00 

Available & Estimated Receipts 79,600.00 



Estimated Net Cost to Town $260,300.00 



131 



HATFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

1967 - 1968 

1967 

Sept. 5 Staff meeting — 9:30 a.m. 

Sept. 6 Schools open — full sessions 

Oct. 12 Columbus Day — no school 

Oct. 30 Teachers' Convention — no school 

Nov. 22 Thanksgiving recess 

Schools close — full sessions 

Nov. 27 Schools reopen — full sessions 

Dec. 22 Christmas recess 

Schools close — full sessions 

1968 

Jan. 2 Schools reopen — full sessions 

Feb. 16 Schools close for winter vacation 

Feb. 26 Schools reopen — full sessions 

Apr. 12 Good Friday — no school 

Schools close for spring vacation 

Apr. 22 Schools reopen — full sessions 

May 30 Memorial Day — no school 

June 14 High School graduation 

June 20 All pupils dismissed at close of day with 

(185 days) report cards 

June 21 Teachers will report until closing details 

of year are completed 

132 



In appreciation for 

26 consecutive years of 

dedicated service to the 

Town of Hatfield 




MR. GORDON WOODWARD 

Town Moderator 

Feb. 16, 1942 - Feb. 18, 1969 



The Athenian Oath 



We will never bring disgrace to this our 
city, by any act of dishonesty or cowardice, 
nor ever desert our suffering comrades in 
the ranks; we will fight for the ideals and 
sacred things of the city, both alone and with 
many; we will revere and obey the city's 
laws and do our best to incite a like respect 
in those above us who are prone to annul or 
set them at naught; we will strive unceas- 
ingly to quicken the public's sense of civic 
duty, thus in all these ways ive will transmit 
this city not only less, but greater and more 
beautiful than it was transmitted to us. 



THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD 

Wish to dedicate this page 

to the 

men and women of 

this town who have served 

and are serving 

in the Armed Forces 

of the 

United States of America 

for their 

faithful performance of duties 

in the 

KOREAN WAR 

AND 

VIET NAM 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1968 



Printed by 

Gazette Printing Co., Inc. 

Northampton, Mass. 



Town Officers for 1 968 



SELECTMEN 

Frank J. Godek, Chairman 
A. Cory Bardwell Stanley J. Filipek 

CLERK, BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Anne M. Filipek 

MODERATOR 

Gordon A. Woodward 

TOWN CLERK - TREASURER 

Peter S. Rogaleski 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Mitchell W. Kempisty, Chairman 
Richard D. Belden Joseph S. Wilkes 

TAX COLLECTOR 

Thomas L. Mullany 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Stanley Sliwoski, Chairman 
Ethel I. Byrne Raymond Russell 

John W. Filipek Edward Zima 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Rupert Harubin, Chairman 
Michael Bruscoe John R. Rudy 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Arthur Cory Bardwell, Chairman 
William Podmayer Edward Kowalski 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Michael M. Majeskey 
Rita Prew Shirley Maiewski 

ELECTOR UNDER THE WILL OF OLIVER SMITH 

Henry P. Betsold 

TREE WARDEN 

Francis E. Godin 

PLANNING BOARD 

Francis H. Hebert, Chairman 
William H. Burke III Henry F. Szych 

John S. Besko Adolph Ciszewski 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Gordon Woodward, Jr. John Besko 

Henry Skorupski William Korza 

Gordon Williams — State Appointed 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

Henry Betsold, Pres. 
Bernard J. Kosior Thomas P. Mullins 

James Mullins Frederick Hanks 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Thaddeus Rabat, Chairman 
Robert Polhemus Leon C. Maksimoski 

Alternates 

Harold Lyman Thomas Yarrows 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Atty. Elizabeth A. Porada 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Joseph V. Porada, Jr., Chairman 
Frederick J. Zehelski Edward J. Wickles 

Howard B. Abbott William H. Burke, Jr. 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Howard B. Abbott, Chairman 

Joseph J. Pelc Peter S. Rogaleski 

Edward T. Kostek 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Gertrude B. Rogaleski 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

Joseph J. Deres 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS & SLAUGHTER 

Frank Sikorski, Jr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Albert E. Jenest — 210 Elm St., Greenfield 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS 

Charles J. Eberlein, Sr. 

COLLECTOR OF WATER RENTS 

Harold B. Lizek 

DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Thomas P. Mullins 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Rene Labbe 

WOOD SURVEYORS 

Bernard Donnis Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Joseph V. Porada Daniel Zagranic 

John Osley, Jr. Elizabeth Porada 

John W. Filipek, Jr. 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Joseph Mieleszko 

FENCE VIEWERS AND FIELD DRIVERS 

Marshall Pease Charles J. Eberlein, Jr. 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Henry J. Sliwoski 

CONSTABLES 

Frank J. Godek A. Cory Bardwell 

Henry J. Sliwoski Mitchell W. Kempisty 

James E. McGrath Peter Kubosiak 

Joseph S. Wilkes Stanley J. Filipek 

Henry Kosakowski John Brennan 

George W. Rogalewski William Podmayer 

Anthony Malinowski Peter P. Backiel 

Stanley Malinowski George Omasta 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Anthony J. Sikorski Adolf Ciszewski 

William A. Symanski Stanley Jagodzinski 

Harold B. Lizek Robert Thayer 

William Slowikowski Ralph F. Vollinger 

Stanley S. Symanski Thaddeus Kabat 

David E. Omasta John Szych 

SPECIAL POLICE 

Joseph Deres 

FIRE CHIEF 

Myron J. Sikorksi 



10 



FIREFIGHTERS 
Main Street Station 

Edward Kempisty, Deputy Chief 

Alfred Proulx, Deputy Chief 

William Boyle, Captain 

Frank Sikorski, Captain 

David Lizek, Lieut. 

Peter Kotch, Lieut. 



Robert Osepowicz 
Bernard Pelis 
Gerald Barsh 
Carl Prucnal 
John Rogalewski 
Stanley Slyz, Jr. 
Charles Petrowicz 
Richard Vollinger 



Robert Shea 

Bernard Shaw 

Joseph Szych 

William Korza 

Marcus Boyle 

Marshall Pease 

Richard Petrowicz 

Donald Vollinger 



North Hatfield Station 

Richard Belden, Asst. Chief 



Connie Sysun 
Louis Kubilis 
David Southard 
Andrew Baceski 
Richard Stevens 
Philip Maiewski 



Ronald Omasta 

Michael Omasta 

Teddy Smiarowski 

Anthony Symanski 

Adam Bielunis 

William Belden 



John Wroblewski 



11 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Incorporated 1670 

AREA 

8900 Acres 

ELEVATION 

132 Feet at Main Street 

POPULATION 

1967 Census — 2780 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Second Hampshire District 

EDWARD McCOLGAN 

STATE SENATOR 

Franklin & Hampshire District 

JOHN D. BARRUS 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 
First Congressional District 

SILVIO 0. CONTE 

SENATORS IN CONGRESS 

EDWARD BROOKE 
EDWARD M. KENNEDY 



12 



Selectmen's Warrant 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Hatfield in 
said County, Greeting, : 

Tn the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby 
directed to notify and warn the Inhabitants of said Town 
qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to meet in 
Memorial Town Hall in said Hatfield on Tuesday, the 
eighteenth day of February next, at ten o'clock in the 
-forenoon, then and there to take action under Article 1, 
and to meet at seven o'clock in the evening to take action 
on all other articles : 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for 
the following year: One Selectman for three years; One 
Moderator for three years ; One Treasurer for three years ; 
One Tax Collector for three years; One member of the 
Board of Assessors for three years ; Two members of the 
School Committee for three years each; One member of 
the Board of Water Commissioners for three years ; One 
member of the Library Trustees for three years; One 
Tree Warden for three years ; One Elector Under the Will 
of Oliver Smith for one year; One member of the Plan- 
ning Board for five years ; One member of the Sewer Com- 
mission for three years ; and one member of the Cemetery 
Commission for three years. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon 
and kept open until eight o'clock in the evening. 



13 



Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial years, beginning January 1, 1969 
and January 1, 1970 in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with the provisions of Section 17, 
Chapter 44, General Laws. 



Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
a sum of money received from the Dog Fund to the Libra- 
ry Account, or act anything thereon. 



Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate a sum of money from the State Aid for Libraries Ac- 
count to the Library Account, or act anything thereon. 



Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer such sums of money as shall 
be deemed necessary to defray the current expenses and 
charges of the financial year, including debt and interest ; 
set the salaries for all elected officials in accordance with 
the provisions of Section 108, Chapter 41 of the General 
Laws; and provide for a reserve fund; or act anything 
thereon. 



Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate, including appropriations from available 
funds, the sum of $5,279.50 as allocated by the actuary 
and certified by the County Commissioners to the Town 
<»f Hatfield under the provisions of Chapter 32, General 
Laws, as amended, and pay said amount to the Treasurer- 
' ustodian of the Hampshire County Retirement System. 



14 



Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to cooperate with the County and State un- 
der the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, the Town's 
share for improvement of Chapter 90 highways, and to 
appropriate the sum of $2,000.00, the State and County 
share, for the same purpose, in anticipation of reimburse- 
ment from the State and County ; the Town's share to be 
raised by taxation and the State and County share to be 
taken from Surplus Revenue and returned to same when 
reimbursement is received, or act anything thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to cooperate with the State under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 81, General Laws, to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $8,500.00, the Town's share, and to ap- 
propriate the sum of $14,025.00, the State's share, in an- 
ticipation of reimbursement from the State; the Town's 
share to be raised by taxation and the State's share to be 
taken from Surplus Revenue and returned to same when 
reimbursement is received, or act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to cooperate with the State and County un- 
der the provisions of Chapter 90, General Laws, and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $5,250.00, as the Town's 
share, the sum of $5,250.00 as the County's share, and the 
sum of $10,500.00 as the State's share for construction of 
a new bridge on Prospect Street in place of the old one sit- 
uated near the Porter McLeod Machine Shop, the Town's 
share to be raised by taxation and the State and County's 
share to be taken from Surplus Revenue and returned to 
same when reimbursement is received, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 for surveying and updat- 
ing the bounds of public streets in the Town or take any 
action thereon. 



15 



Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,500.00 for the resurfacing and 
repair of the sidewalk on the westerly side of Main Street 
from School Street to Maple Street or take any action 
thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate, including appropriations from available 
funds, the sum of $100 for painting the face of the Town 
Clock in the Congregational Church or act anything there- 
on. 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to place 
street lights in the following locations : 

At the residence of Eugene Proulx on Main 
Street pole No. 42, 

At the residence of Donald Damon on Dwight 
Street, pole No. 26, 

At the residence of Ronald Pickunka on Chest- 
nut Street, pole No. 25, 

At the residence of Leo Lesieur on Sunset Ave- 
nue, pole No. 44, 

At the Town Dump Site, pole to be installed. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate $14,000.00 for the repair and renovation of 
the Town Hall or take any action thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate $1,000.00 for the purchase of furniture and 
equipment for the Town Hall or take any action thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $188 to meet the cost and expenses 
of the Town's membership in the Lower Pioneer Valley 
Regional Planning District. 



16 



Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to establish 
a Committee of three members one of whom shall be the 
Superintendent of Streets and the other two to be appoint- 
ed by the Moderator who shall be empowered to fill any 
vacancy in said Committee to investigate the need for the 
construction of a new Town Highway Garage on Town 
Property presently owned, the size thereof, and the con- 
struction cost thereof and to investigate and study the 
need and costs of repairs to the present Highway, Fire De- 
partment, and Highway Storage Building and to submit 
their report on these subjects to the Board of Selectmen 
no later than June 1 next and further, to see if the Town 
will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $100 for the 
expense of this Committee for said purpose. 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to establish 
a Committee of three to be appointed by the Moderator to 
study the selection, cost of construction, and site for erect- 
ing a Memorial Honor Roll for veterans of the Korean and 
Vietnam conflicts and to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$100 for the expenses of the committee, said Committee 
to submit the results of their study no later than June 1 
next to the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate a sum of money for the construction of sewerage sys- 
tems in Main, Maple, Elm, South, and King Streets and in 
Bridge Lane and for the construction of sewerage treat- 
ment and disposal facilities, including costs of necessary 
land takings; to determine whether the Board of Sewer 
Commissioners shall be authorized to apply for any state 
and/or federal aid available for said project; and to deter- 
mine whether the money for said project shall be provided 
for by taxation, by appropriation from available funds in 
the Town Treasury, or by borrowing under the provisions 
of Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts or by a combination of any or all of 
these methods or take any action relative thereto. 



17 



Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to acquire 
a tract of land containing about 5.95 Acres belonging to 
the heirs of Frank Zagrodnick and Katie Zagrodnick situ- 
ated in Indian Hollow or Indian Field in the Town between 
the dike and the Connecticut River, said tract of land 
being more particularly described below, for the construc- 
tion of a sewerage treatment plant and outfall and to ap- 
propriate the sum of $3,000 from those funds voted under 
Article 19 for said purpose or take any action thereon. 

Said tract of land is described as follows : 

Beginning at a point in a dike and road, formerly a 
dike, said point being N. 45° E. a distance of one hundred 
thirteen and thirty-seven hundredths (113.37) feet along 
said dike from the intersection of said dike with a road 
running easterly from South Street; thence S. 58° 20' E. a 
distance of about nine hundred seventy (970) feet along 
land now or recently of Aniela Kabat, formerly of Thad- 
deus Graves to the Connecticut River ; thence southerly a 
distance of about two hundred fifty-six (256) feet along 
said Connecticut River to a point at land now or recently 
of Mary Kempisty, formerly of Cornelia Billings; thence 
N. 58° 32' W. a distance of about one thousand seventy- 
eight (1078) feet along said land of Mary Kempisty to a 
point in said dike; thence N. 45° E. a distance of two hun- 
dred sixty-four and twenty-six hundredths (264.26) feet 
along said dike to the point of beginning. 

Containing about 5.95 Acres; and being the same 
premises as shown as Parcel 4 on a plan titled: "LAND 
FOR SEWAGE DISPOSAL SITE BOARD OF SEWER 
COMMISSIONERS TOWN OF HATFIELD, MASS. Tighe 
& Bond, Inc., Consulting Engineers Holyoke, Mass. — 
Scale 1" — 100' Date: December, 1966" and being the land 
further conveyed to Frank and Katie Zagrodnick by a deed 
recorded in the Hampshire County Registry of Deeds in 
Book 793, Page 97. 



18 



Subject to the rights of the inhabitants of the Town 
of Hatfield and others to enter and maintain said dike, and 
subject to rights of others in a meadow road across the 
corner of said land and said former road or dike road. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to acquire a 
strip of land from Nellie Kabat twenty-five (25) feet in 
width and approximately one thousand (1,000) feet in 
length running along the northerly side of property be- 
longing to Nellie Kabat situated between South Street and 
the Connecticut River Dike for the purpose of building a 
road thereon and installing utilities to serve the proposed 
sewerage treatment plant and to appropriate the sum of 
$400 for this purpose from the funds provided under Ar- 
ticle 19. 

Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to acquire 
from Alfred and Amelia Zehelski a strip of land twenty- 
five (25) feet wide and approximately one thousand 
(1,000) feet in length running along the southerly side of 
property of Alfred and Amelia K. Zehelski between South 
Street and the Connecticut River for the purpose of build- 
ing a road thereon and installing utilities to serve the pro- 
posed sewerage treatment plant and to appropriate the 
sum of $400 for this purpose from funds provided under 
Article 19 or take any action thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Assessors to enter into a contract for the 
preparation of assessors' maps and to appropriate the sum 
of $14,000 from Surplus Revenue for said purpose or take 
any action thereon. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will petition the State 
Tax Commission for the installation of the State Assess- 
ment System as provided in Section 7 A of Chapter 58 of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
or take any action thereon. 



19 



Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3,500 for use of the Hatfield Ter- 
centenary Committee in its preparation for the Town's 
celebration of its 300th anniversary or take any action 
thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the Town will raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1,000 for repairs and renovation of the 
upper room of the Town Library in order to render it 
suitable to house the Town Museum which it is planned 
will be ready and open to the public early in 1970, the 
300th anniversary year. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
Section II-A entitled "Types of Districts" of the Zoning 
By-Law of the Town of Hatfield so that said section shall 
read: 

II-A. Types of Districts. For purposes of this By- 
Law, the Town of Hatfield is hereby divided 
into the following types of use districts : 

1. Residential District — A. 

2. Agricultural - Residential. 

3. Business A. 

4. Business B. 

5. Industrial 

6. Flood-Plain. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
Section II-B entitled "Location of Districts" of the Zoning 
By-Law and the Zoning Map of the Town of Hatfield in- 
corporated thereby as amended by changing to a Flood 
Plain Zone the following parcels of land in Hatfield as 
shown on a plan attached to this warrant and on file in the 
Office of the Town Clerk entitled "Prosposed Amendment 
to Zoning By-Law under Article 28 of the Town Warrant," 
to which reference is made for a more particular descrip- 
tion of the parcels described below : 



20 



Tract 1: By changing from an Agricultural-Resi- 
dential Zone to Flood-Plain that strip of land described as 
follows : 

Beginning at a point in the Hatfield- Whately Town 
Line lying 1,000 feet west of the top of the bank of the 
Connecticut River and thence running Easterly along the 
Whately Town Line to the top of the bank of the Connec- 
ticut River and thence turning and running along the top 
of the bank of the Connecticut River to that land lying 
east of Main Street and next to the Connecticut River 
zoned Industrial ; thence turning and running in a Wester- 
ly direction 1,000 feet to a point set 1,000 feet west of the 
top of the Connecticut River Bank and thence turning and 
running in a Northerly direction along the land zoned 
Agricultural-Residential to the point of beginning. Said 
strip of land is to be 1,000 feet in width extending wester- 
ly for that distance from the top of the Connecticut River 
Bank. Being the most northerly tract marked Flood-Plain 
on the above mentioned plan attached hereto. 

Tract 2: By changing from an Agricultural-Resi- 
dential Zone to Flood-Plain that strip of land extending 
from Bridge Lane to the Mill River lying southerly and 
southeasterly of the Dike abutting the Connecticut River. 
Being the middle tract designated Flood-Plain on the 
above mentioned plan attached hereto. 

Tract 3. By changing from an Agricultural-Resi- 
dential Zone and Industrial Zone to Flood-Plain that strip 
of land abutting on the Connecticut River running from 
the Mill River westerly to the Northampton-Hatfield town 
line being uniformly 1,000 feet in width measured for that 
distance westerly from the top of the Connecticut River 
Bank. Being the most westerly tract designated Flood- 
Plain on the above mentioned plan attached hereto. 

Article 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
Section III of the Zoning By-Law as amended by adding 
to said by-law the following new section : 



21 



III-F. Flood-Plain District. 

1. No building or structure shall be permit- 
ted to be erected in this district but the 
land may be used for the following pur- 
poses : 

a. Farming. 

b. Recreation. 

2. Any lot or parcel of land in this district 
shall meet the minimum requirements for 
area and frontage for lots required in a 
Residence A Zone under this Zoning By- 
Law unless said lot or parcel of land was 
shown on a plan or described in a deed 
duly recorded at the time of the adoption 
of this by-law and did not at the time of 
the adoption of this by-law adjoin other 
land of the same owner available for use in 
connection with said lot or parcel. 

Article 30. To hear and discuss all reports or sub- 
jects which have to do with the welfare of the Town or 
act anything thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof in five public places in the Town 
of Hatfield, seven days before time of said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time 
and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 27th day of January in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and sixty- 
nine. 

FRANK J. GODEK 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
A. CORY BARDWELL 

Selectmen of Hatfield 



22 



PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO ZONING BY-LAW 
UNDER ARTICLE 28 OF TOWN WARRANT 



Hatfield, Mass., Zoning Map 

May 1961 — Revised May 2, 1962 




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EDWARD J. WICKLES 
FREDERICK J. ZEHEL 
HOWARD B. ABBOTT 
WM. H. BURKE, JR. 


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28 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Hatfield : 

We respectfully submit our annual report for the 
year 1968. 

We are looking forward to the celebration of the 
town's 300th Anniversary which will take place in 1970. 
The Tercentenary Committee is in its second year of plan- 
ning and much progress has been made already in getting 
this celebration under way. 

New construction for the year 1968 included 21 new 
homes, 1 relocated home, four garages, six home additions, 
three swimming pools and one office for a combined total 
valuation of $400,000. 

Road repair and reconstruction has been completed 
on School Street. Approximately 2400 ft. of Elm Street 
was resurfaced and and 500 ft, at the intersection of Pros- 
pect and School Streets was resurfaced. Future construc- 
tion for King Street is slated for 1969 from the Zehelski 
residence to the intersection of King Street and North 
Hatfield Road (town property) . 

The damaged bridge at Brook Hollow was repaired 
by replacing the culverts. 

Approximately 17 acres of land — formerly the prop- 
erty of Mabel Kingsley — was purchased for the town 
dump. The entrance to the town dump has been reposted 
and a new fence has been installed. This property may be 
considered the future sight of the highway department 
garage to consolidate this space for the highway depart- 
ment and the water department. 



29 



A sidewalk tractor was purchased for the highway- 
department and has been very useful year-round. 

Please note that the town cruiser may not be used to 
transport any person or persons unless it is an emergency 
which has been ordered by a local physician. This is in 
compliance with a new state legislature law under the 
Department of Public Health, acting under the authority 
of the General Laws, Chapter III, Section 8-B. 

Temporary repairs were made on the town hall roof. 
However, it is our recommendation that these old slate 
shingles be replaced with asphalt shingles and a new ceil- 
ing be installed in the town hall. New doors, with panic 
bars as required by the state building code, were installed. 
Storm sash have been installed on the first floor and all 
exterior woodwork has been painted this past summer. 

The town clock has been repaired and electrified. 

A new appointment has been made — Mr. Rene 
Labbee — plumbing inspector. 

New lighting has been installed in several parts of the 
town. After a long interval of time and requests, with the 
Northampton Department of Public Works, we are pleased 
that we now have two 7,000 lumen lights installed at the 
intersection of Route 5 and the ramp leading to Route 91. 

The Board has been making very satisfactory prog- 
ress with the state with regard to the boat-launching 
ramp, and it is felt that it is quite likely that the state 
will install a boat-launching ramp for the town in 1969. 

Looking ahead to future construction — the State 
Department of Public Works has given its approval for a 
new bridge on Prospect Street, for which the town must 



30 



appropriate its share of the moneys for three years, under 
Chapter 90. This would mean % town, 14 county, and 
1/2 state. 

The Board meets every first and third Tuesday eve- 
ning of each month at 7:30 P.M. The door is always open 
to all who may seek information of any kind. Many times 
misinformation can be cleared through discussion and 
complete understanding accomplished. 

At this time we would like to express our appreciation 
to all officers and departments for their cooperation in the 
year 1968. 



FRANK J. GODEK, Chairman 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
A. CORY BARDWELL 

Board of Selectmen 



31 



Director of Accounts 

July 25, 1968 

To the Board of Selectmen 
Mr. Frank J. Godek, Chairman 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 
Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the period from 
December 28, 1965 to January 31, 1968, made in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. 
This is in the form of a report made to me by Mr. William 
Schwartz, Assistant Chief of Bureau. 

Very truly yours, 

ARTHUR H. MacKINNON 

Director of Accounts 
AHM:esv 



Mr. Arthur H. MacKinnon 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an 
audit of the books and accounts of the town of Hatfield 
for the period from December 28, 1965, the date of the 
previous examination, to January 31, 1968, and report 
thereon as follows: 

The records of financial transactions of the several 
departments collecting or disbursing money for the town 
or committing bills for collection were examined, checked, 
and verified by comparison with the records in the offices 
of the town accountant and the town treasurer. 

32 



The surety bonds of the several town officials required 
to furnish them for the faithful performance of their 
duties were examined and found to be in proper form. 

The books and accounts in the town accountant's 
office were examined and checked. The recorded receipts 
were compared with the treasurer's books and with the 
records in the several departments collecting money for 
the town, while the payments, as entered were checked 
with the treasurer's books and with the treasury war- 
rants. The appropriations, transfers, and loan authoriza- 
tions were checked with the town clerk's records of finan- 
cial votes passed by the town meetings and with the 
finance committee's authorization of transfers from the 
reserve fund. 

The general and appropriation ledger accounts were 
analyzed and proved, the necessary adjustments resulting 
from the audit were made, and a balance sheet, which is 
appended to this report, was prepared showing the finan- 
cial condition of the town on December 31, 1967. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were 
examined and checked in detail. The cash book was footed 
and the recorded receipts were compared with the town 
accountant's books, with the departmental records of pay- 
ments to the treasurer, and with other sources from which 
money was paid into the town treasury. The payments 
were compared with the warrants approved by the select- 
men and with the town accountant's books. 

The treasurer's cash balance on January 31, 1968 was 
proved by reconciliation of the bank balances with state- 
ments furnished by the banks of deposit and by actual 
count of the cash in the office. 

The records of payroll deductions for Federal and 
State taxes, the county retirement system, and group in- 



surance were examined. The payments to the proper 
agencies were verified, and the balances in the general 
trasury were proved with the respective controls in the 
accountant's ledger. 

The savings bank books representing the investment 
of the trust and investment funds in the custody of the 
town treasurer were examined and listed. The bequests 
and income were proved, and the withdrawals were com- 
pared with the treasurer's record of receipts. 

The records pertaining to funded debt were examined 
and checked. The loans issued were compared with the 
treasurer's cash receipts, while the payments on account 
of maturing debt and interest were compared with the 
amounts falling due and were checked with the cancelled 
securities and coupons on file. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked in detail. The accounts outstanding 
at the time of the previous examination, as well as all 
subsequent commitments of taxes, excise, and sewer use 
charges, were audited and proved with warrants commit- 
ting them for collection. The recorded collections were 
checked, the payments to the treasurer were verified, the 
recorded abatements were compared with the records of 
the assessors and the sewer commissioners, and the out- 
standing accounts were listed and proved with the ac- 
countant's ledger. The cash balance on January 31, 1968 
was proved by actual count of the cash in the office. 

It may be noted from the appended balance sheet that 
the outstanding tax accounts and motor vehicle excise 
date back to 1961, and it is again urged that settlement 
be promptly obtained of all the delinquent tax and excise 
accounts. 



24 



The records of the departmental and water accounts 
receivable were examined and checked. The commitments 
were verified, the recorded collections were proved with 
the town accountant's ledger controls. The cash on hand 
in the water department on January 31, 1968 was proved 
by actual count. 

For purposes of verifying the outstanding tax, ex- 
cise, sewer, and water accounts, notices were mailed to a 
number of persons whose names appeared on the books as 
owing money to the town, the replies received thereto in- 
dicating that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The receipts of the town clerk for dog and sporting 
licenses, as well as for gasoline renewals, were checked 
with the records of licenses and permits issued. The pay- 
ments to the town treasurer and to the Division of Fish- 
eries and Game were verified, and the cash on hand Jan- 
uary 31, 1968 was proved by actual count. 

The appropriations as voted by town meetings, were 
listed from the records of the town clerk and were com- 
pared with the aggregate amounts raised by the assessors 
in the determination of the tax rates for 1966 and 1967. 

The records of receipts of the selectmen, as well as 
of the police, highway, school, and library departments, 
and of all other departments collecting money for the 
town, were examined and checked. The payments to the 
treasurer were checked with the treasurer's cash receipts 
and with the records of the town accountant, while the 
cash on hand in the several departments was verified by 
actual count. 

In addition to the balance sheet, there are appended 
to this report tables showing reconciliations of the several 
cash accounts, summaries of the tax, excise, sewer, water, 



35 



and departmental accounts, as well as schedules showing 
the transactions and conditions of the trust and invest- 
ment funds. 

While engaged in making the audit cooperation was 
received from all town officials, for which on behalf of my 
assistants and for myself, I wish to express appreciation. 



Respectfully submitted, 
WILLIAM SCHWARTZ 
Assistant Chief of Bureau 



WS:esv 



36 



List of Jurors 



Balise, Raymond 
Belden, Richard D. 
Deres, Wanda 
Dorsch, Lawrence 
Englehardt, Marion 
Filipek, Ann B. 
Gallant, Wallace R. 
Garstka, John 
Hart, Jovita D. 
Jablonski, Helen 
Labbee, Frances K. 
Labbee, Richard 
Maksimoski, Leon C. 
Michaluk, Joseph 
Mieleszko, Sophie 
Pickunka, Walter A. 
Riley, Daniel F. 
Robert, Leo H. 
Rogaleski, Gertrude B. 
Slowikowski, William J. 
Stef ancik, Anne 
Strong, Irene A. 
Szych, Irene A. 
Tremblay, Doris V. 
Vollinger, Doris 
Vollinger, Fritz 
Vollinger, Mary M. 
Wilkes, Joseph 
Yagodzinski, Rosalie M. 
Yarrows, Anne M. 
Ziezulewicz, Stanley E. 



Farmer 

Salesman 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Farm Worker 

Retired 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Garage Manager 

Attendant 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Manufacturer 

Retired 

Retired 

Housewife 

Service Manager 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Farmer 

Housewife 

Farm Manager 

Housewife 

Retired 

Food Handler 



37 



Treasurer's Report 



PETER S. ROGALESKI, Treasurer 
In Account with the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts 

Cash Book Balance January 1, 1968 $ 288,333.27 



dpts for 1968: 




January- 


$ 13,886.21 


February 


24,809.76 


March 


57,669.14 


April 


47,399.39 


May 


48,462.80 


June 


42,963.42 


July 


64,001.44 


August 


14,138.12 


September 


57,792.52 


October 


149,859.08 


November 


193,203.58 


December 


80,280.65 



794,466.11 
$ 1,082,799.38 



38 



Payments per Warrants: 






January 


$ 21,736.43 




February 


46,227.87 




March 


61,626.16 




April 


59,674.77 




May 


54,874.78 




June 


59,581.43 




July 


93,287.45 




August 


38,266.29 




September 


57,680.99 




October 


80,382.65 




November 


65,152.07 




December 


125,369.67 


763,860.56 






Cash Book Balance 






December 31, 1968 




318,938.82 



$ 1,082,799.38 



In- With- Bal- 

come drawn ance 

Cemetery Perpetual 

Care $1,151.01 $1,140.23 $23,693.88 
Hannah W. Smith 

(Custody State Treas.) 300.00 

Firemen's Relief Fund 5.37 123.98 

Stabilization Fund 3,860.23 98,689.35 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Treasurer 

39 



Assessors* Report 



Value of Assessed Real Estate 


$ 15,267,890.00 


Value of Assessed Personal Property 


1,004,300.00 


Total Personal Real 


$ 16,272,190.00 


Number of Acres of Land 


1,100 


Number of Dwellings 


834 


Overlay for Abatements 


$ 29,453.53 


Town Appropriations 


686,825.21 


State Audit 


61.46 


State Parks & Reservations 


2,221.50 


County Tax 


34,330.25 


County Hospital 


2,923.87 


Motor Vehicle Tax Bills 


293.55 


School Library and Lunch 


5,417.21 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Excise Tax $ 50,000.00 

Licenses 6,200.00 

Interest on Taxes 2,500.00 

All Other Receipts 2,964.88 

Cherry Sheet Appendix 149,095.94 

Motor Courts and Parks 500.00 

Total Estimated Receipts 211,260.82 

Total Available Funds 70,122.38 

Amount to be raised by Taxation 406,804.75 



40 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Church Property $304,850.00 

Town Property 955,050.00 

Smith Academy 63,000.00 

Cemeteries 103,000.00 

American Legion 35,000.00 

D.P.W. Office 475,000.00 

Water Supply System 90,000.00 

Schools 798,000.00 

Highway Department 150,000.00 



MITCHELL W. KEMPISTY, Chm, 
RICHARD D. BELDEN 
JOSEPH S. WILKES 

Board of Assessors 



41 



Town Clerk's Report 





VITAL STATISTICS 






1968 






Births Marriages 


Deat 


Male 


15 31 


10 


Female 


19 


15 



Total 



34 



31 



25 



Preceding Five Years 



1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 
1963 



1968 
1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 



42 27 


17 


34 25 


26 


43 29 


31 


43 29 


29 


43 20 


31 


LICENSES 




Dogs 


Fish & Game 


236 


428 


248 


396 


227 


386 


208 


416 


190 


414 



42 



ELECTIONS 

Registered Voters 12/31/68 1,530 

Voted at Annual Town Meeting 2/19/68 991 

Voted at Presidential Primary 4/30/68 

Democratic 321 

Republican 20 

Voted at State Primary 9/17/68 

Democratic 363 

Republican 22 

Voted at State & National Election 11/5/68 1,321 

Special Town Meetings held in 1968 2 



PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



43 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 

MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 21, 1968 

ARTICLES AND VOTES UNDER SAME 



Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to enter the 
State Department of Education Proposed K-12 expanded 
school system composed of the total school systems of 
Conway, Deerfield, Hatfield, Sunderland, Whately, and the 
Frontier Regional School District to effect one school dis- 
trict for children attending Kindergarten through grade 
12, or take any action relative thereto. 



Article 1. Voted not to enter the State Department 
of Education Proposed K-12 expanded school system com- 
posed of the total school systems of Conway, Deerfield, 
Hatfield, Sunderland, Whately, and the Frontier Regional 
School District to effect one school district for children 
attending Kindergarten through grade 12. 

Yes 27 No 251 



Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to rename 
that section of Chestnut Street, also referred to as Plain 
Road, extending northerly in a half circle from the resi- 
dence of Lawrence Dorsch and Francis Vollinger to Circle 
Drive and the residence of Donald Brooks to be Circle 
Drive and add that aforesaid section of said Chestnut 
Street, also referred to as Plain Road, to the present Circle 
Drive. 



44 



Article 2. Voted to rename that section of Chest- 
nut Street, also referred to as Plain Road, extending 
northerly in a half circle from the residence of Lawrence 
Dorsch and Francis Vollinger to Circle Drive and the resi- 
dence of Donald Brooks, to be Circle Drive and add that 
aforesaid section of said Chestnut Street, also referred to 
as Plain Road, to be the present Circle Drive. 
Yes 22 No 14 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate the sum of $1,000.00 from Surplus Revenue for the re- 
wiring of the Hatfield Public Library, or take any action 
thereon. 

Article 3. Voted to appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 
from Surplus Revenue for the rewiring of the Hatfield 
Public Library. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to establish 
and accept as a town way the layout of the following 
street in the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts: 

Plantation Road, a strip of land approximately fifty- 
five feet in width running in an easterly direction 
from the easterly side of Gore Avenue, a public way 
in the Town of Hatfield, to the northerly side of 
Bridge Street in the Town of Hatfield, as shown on 
a plan of land entitled "Definitive Subdivision Plan 
Land in Hatfield, Mass., Belonging to Theodore Blau- 
velt" dated October 7, 1961, and recorded in Hamp- 
shire County Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 62, 
Page 17, to which reference is made for a more par- 
ticular description thereof, and on file in the Office 
of the Town Clerk, Hatfield, Massachusetts. 

Article 4. Voted that the Town establish and ac- 
cept the following street in the Town of Hatfield, Massa- 
chusetts : 



45 



Plantation Road, consisting of a strip of land approxi- 
mately 55 (fifty-five) feet in width running in an east- 
erly direction from the easterly side of Gore Avenue, 
a public way, in the Town of Hatfield, to the northerly 
side of Bridge Street in the Town of Hatfield, as 
shown on a plan of land entitled "Definitive Subdivi- 
sion Plan Land in Hatfield, Mass., Belonging to Theo- 
dore Blauvelt" dated October 7, 1961, and recorded 
in the Hampshire County Registry of Deeds in Plan 
Book 62, said title to said way to vest upon delivery 
of a deed by the owner of said way within 30 days 
of this vote. 



Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to acquire 
land allegedly belonging to Mabel C. Kingsley, situated on 
the esaterly side of Straits Road so called and the north- 
easterly side of King Street, hereinafter more particularly 
described, for the purpose of establishing a town dump 
and for said purpose to appropriate the sum of $3,0000.00 
from Surplus Revenue or take any action thereon. Said 
aforementioned land is more particularly bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

Beginning at an iron pin located in the easterly loca- 
tion line of Straits Road at the most northwesterly 
corner of the parcel herein described and at the south- 
westerly corner of land now or formerly of Robert P. 
Cernak; thence running S. 77° 56' 12" E. along land 
of Robert P. Cernak 374.11' to an iron pin set at the 
top of the bank by the lower Great Pond, so called; 
thence continuing in the same course along land of 
said Cernak 16' more or less to the edge of lower 
Great Pond, so called; thence running southerly and 
southeasterly along the westerly and southwesterly 
side of lower Great Pond, so called, 1680' more or less 
to a point; thence running S. 26° 55' 44" W. along 
land of owners unknown 418' more or less to an iron 
pin located at the most southerly corner of the parcel 



46 



herein described and at land of Conway Realty Trust, 
formerly of one John W. Maroney ; thence running N. 
29° 19' 18" W. along land of said Conway Realty 
Trust 235.90' to an iron pin; thence running N. 16° 
23' 38" W. along land of Conway Realty Trust 214.93' 
to an iron pin, said iron pin being located at the most 
northeasterly corner of land belonging to Conway 
Realty Trust and the same being the most southeast- 
erly corner of land belonging to Walter R. Thayer et 
ux; thence running N. 55° 08' 51" W. along land of 
said Walter R. Thayer et ux 175.56' to an iron pin; 
thence running N. 23° 00' 00" W. along land of said 
Walter R. Thayer et ux 10' more or less to the center- 
line of a brook; thence running in a northwesterly, 
westerly and southwesterly direction and following 
the centerline of the brook about 460' to a point lo- 
cated on the northeasterly sideline of King Street, so 
called; thence running N. 24° 24' 58" W. along the 
northeasterly side of King Street, so called, 10' more 
or less to an iron pin set at the top of the brook bank ; 
thence continuing in the same course and along the 
northeasterly side of King Street, so called, 200.00' 
to a highway bound point, said point being located at 
the intersection of the northeasterly sideline of King 
Street and the easterly sideline of Straits Road; 
thence running North 07° 07' 02" E. and running 
along the easterly sideline of Straits Road, so called, 
415.04' to a bound point; thence running N. 01° 43' 
02" E. along the easterly sideline of Straits Road 
572.54' to a bound point; thence running N. 06° 59' 
02" E. along the easterly side of Straits Road 242.14' 
to an iron pin and the point of beginning. 

The above described parcel contains 19.25 acres, 
more or less. For further reference see a plan 
entitled, "Land in Hatfield, Mass. surveyed for 
the Town of Hatfield" scale 1" = 60', dated May 
3, 1968 and prepared by Aimer Huntley, Jr. & 
Associates, Inc., 238 Bridge Street, Northamp- 
ton, Mass. 

47 



Article 5. Voted that the Town authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to purchase or take by eminent domain in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of Chapter 70 of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, that tract 
of land belonging to Mabel C. Kingsley, situated on the 
easterly side of Straits Road, so called, and the north- 
easterly side of King Street as described under Article 5 
in the Town Warrant for the purpose of establishing a 
Town Dump and that for said purpose the Town appro- 
priate the sum of $3,000.00 from Surplus Revenue. 
Unanimous vote. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate the sum of $200.00 from Surplus Revenue to pay to 
Alan K. Cameron and Phyllis A. Cameron as the purchase 
price or as damages for a taking by eminent domain in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 79 of the Gen- 
eral Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as 
amended, by the County Commissioners of that tract of 
land supposed to be owned by Alan K. and Phyllis A. Cam- 
eron and located on the Southwesterly side of King Street, 
so called, and the Easterly side of North Hatfield Street, 
so called, hereinafter more particularly described, for the 
layout, relocation, and alteration of the existing county 
layout of King Street, a public way in the Town of Hat- 
field, which sum of money is required by the County to be 
paid by the Town for said layout, relocation, and altera- 
tion, or take any action thereon. Said tract of land is de- 
scribed as follows : 

Beginning at a point marking the intersection of the 
southwesterly sideline of King Street, so called, and 
the easterly side of North Hatfield Street, so called, 
and thence running S. 24° 24' 58" E. along the south- 
erly sideline of King Street 219.49' to a point; thence 
running N. 48° 06' 57" W. along other land of Alan 
K. Cameron and Phyllis A. Cameron 114.46' to a 
point ; thence running along a curve to the left which 



48 



has a radius of 50.00', a distance of 85.32' to a point 
located on the easterly sideline of North Hatfield 
Street; thence running N. 34° 06' 47" E. along the 
easterly side of North Hatfield Street 60.24' to a 
point; thence running N. 23° 12' 22" E. along the 
easterly side of North Hatfield Street 90.04' to the 
point of beginning. Said parcel contains 8.282 square 
feet, more or less. 



Article 6. Voted that the Town appropriate the sum 
of $200.00 from Surplus Revenue as the purchase price or 
as damages for a taking by eminent domain in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 79 of the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by the County Com- 
missioners of that tract of land from Alan K. and Phyllis 
A. Cameron located on the Southwesterly side of King 
Street and the Easterly side of North Hatfield Street, so 
called, as described under Article 6 of the Town Warrant, 
for the layout, relocation, and alteration of the existing 
county layout of King Street in the Town of Hatfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, which money is required by the County Com- 
missioners to be paid by the Town for said purchase or as 
damages for a taking by eminent domain. 

Unanimous vote. 



Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate the sum of $50.00 from Surplus Revenue to pay Jo- 
sephine Donnis as the purchase price or as damages for 
a taking by eminent domain in accordance with the provi- 
sions of Chapter 79 of the General Laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, as amended, by the County Com- 
missioners of that tract of land located on the southwest- 
erly side of King Street, so called, and supposed to belong 
to said Josephine Donnis, hereinafter described for the 
layout, relocation, and alteration of the existing County 
layout of King Street, a public way in the Town of Hat- 



49 



field, or take any other action relative thereto. Said tract 

of land is described as follows : 

Beginning at a point bearing S. 06° 48' 02" W. and 
70.98' from Station 6+37.20 of the King Street base- 
line; thence running in a southeasterly direction 
along the southwesterly location line of the existing 
King Street layout 395' more or less to a point bear- 
ing N. 75° 25' 35" W. and 93.71' from Station 
11+60.25 of the baseline; thence running N. 39° 42' 
14" W. along land of Josephine Donnis 259.11' to a 
point bearing S. 27° 49' 16" W. and 60.32' from Sta- 
tion 8+00.00 of the baseline of King Street; thence 
running N. 30° 40' 50" W. along land of Josephine 
Donnis 137.78' to the point of beginning. Said parcel 
contains 2,800 square feet, more or less. 

Article 7. Voted that the Town appropriate the sum 
of $50.00 from Surplus Revenue to be paid to Josephine 
Donnis as the purchase price or as damages for a taking 
by eminent domain in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 79 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, by the County Commissioners of that 
tract of land located on the southwesterly side of King 
Street as described under Article 7 of the Town Warrant 
for the layout, relocation, and alteration of the existing 
County layout of King Street which sum of money is re- 
quired by the County Commissioners to be appropriated 
by the Town for said purpose. Unanimous vote. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to pay to 
Meyer & Mendelsohn, Inc. a sum of money from Surplus 
Revenue as the purchase price or as damages for a taking 
by eminent domain in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 79 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts as amended, by the County Commissioners 
of that tract of land located on the northeasterly side of 
King Street and lying at the intersection of King Street, 



50 



North Street, and Cow Brook Road, hereinafter more par- 
ticularly described, for a layout, relocation, and alteration 
of the existing County layout of King Street, a public 
way in the Town, which sum of money is required by the 
County to be paid by the Town, or take any action there- 
on. Said tract of land is more particularly described as 
follows : 

Beginning at a point bearing S. 80° 35' 35" E. and 
46.13' from Station 22+96.27 of the King Street 
baseline, said point being at the intersection of the 
northeasterly sideline of King Street and the easterly 
sideline of Cow Brook Road; thence running S. 44° 
12' 44" E. along land of Meyer & Mendelsohn, Inc. 
150.19' to a point bearing N. 31° 01' 39" E. and 47.48' 
from Station 24+99.21 of the baseline; thence run- 
ning S. 47° 38' 55" E. along land of Meyer & Mendel- 
sohn, Inc. 125' more or less to a point of land now or 
formerly of Joseph & Delia Baceski, Sr. ; thence turn- 
ing and running in a southwesterly direction along 
land of said Joseph and Delia Baceski, Sr. 9' more or 
less to a point on the northeasterly location line of the 
existing King Street layout; thence running N. 54° 
28' 18" E. along the northeasterly location line of the 
existing King Street layout 205' more or less to a 
point located at the intersection of the easterly loca- 
tion line of North Street and the northeasterly loca- 
tion line of King Street; thence running N. 14° 36' 
58" W. 36.96' to a point; thence running N. 26° 58' 
58" W. 53.81' to the point of beginning. 

Said parcel contains 6,084 square feet, more or 
less. 



51 



Article 8. Voted that the Town appropriate the sum 
of $200.00 from Surplus Revenue as the purchase price or 
as damages to be paid to Meyer & Mendelsohn, Inc. by the 
County Commissioners for a taking by eminent domain or 
as the purchase price by the County Commissioners for 
that tract of land located on the northeasterly side of King 
Street and lying at the intersection of King Street, North 
Street and Cow Brook Road, as described under Article 8 
of the Town Warrant for the layout, relocation and alter- 
ation of the existing County layout of King Street, a pub- 
lic way, which sum of money is required by the Town to 
be paid to the County. Unanimous vote. 



Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



52 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 

MASSACHUSETTS 

December 3, 1968 

ARTICLES AND VOTES UNDER SAME 



Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate and transfer the sum of $1,250.00 from Water Avail- 
able Surplus to extend an eight-inch water main line on 
the easterly side of Main Street for a distance of approxi- 
mately 350 feet commencing on or near the Levitre Home- 
stead on North Main Street and thence running in a 
northerly direction approximately 350 feet or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Article 1. Voted to appropriate from Water Avail- 
able Surplus the sum of $1,250.00 to extend an eight-inch 
water main line on the easterly side of Main Street run- 
ning approximately 350 feet in a northerly direction from 
near the Levitre Homestead. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate and transfer the sum of $1,500.00 from Surplus Reve- 
nue to the Town Hall Maintenance Account, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Article 2. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $1,500.00 to the Town Hall Maintenance 
Account. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate of transfer the sum of $2,300.00 from the Machinery 
Earnings Account for the purchase of a second-hand truck 
.and to trade in one 1951 Ford truck chassis, ton and one- 
lialf, as part- of the purchase price for said second-hand 
truck, or take any action relative thereto. 



53 



Article 3. Voted to lay on table. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Hatfield, Massa- 
chusetts, to lease the building or part of the building at 
the intersection of Elm Street and Prospect Street from 
the Hatfield Post No. 344 American Legion, Inc. for the 
term of one year to provide headquarters for the Hatfield 
Post of the American Legion, which post shall have the 
complete control and management of said leased premises 
and which post shall bear all expenses of the management 
and care of the same and to appropriate and transfer the 
sum of $1,000.00 from Surplus Revenue for the rental 
thereof or take any action thereon. 

Article 4. Voted to authorize the Board of Select- 
men of the Town of Hatfield, Massachusetts, to lease part 
of the building at the intersection of Elm Street and Pros- 
pect Street from the Hatfield Post No. 344 American Le- 
gion, Inc. for the term of one year to provide headquar- 
ters for the Hatfield Post of the American Legion, which 
post shall have the complete control and management of 
said leased premises and which post shall bear all the ex- 
penses of the management and care of same and to appro- 
priate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $1,000.00 for the 
rental thereof. 



Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to create a 
special unpaid committee to be known as a regional school 
district planning committee, to consist of three members, 
including one member of the school committee, to be ap- 
pointed by the moderator in accordance with the provi- 
sions of Section 14 of Chapter 71 of the General Laws, as 
amended; and that there be appropriated for the use of 
said committee a sum of money from Surplus Revenue for 
their expenses. 



54 






Article 5. Voted to create a special unpaid commit- 
tee to be known as a regional school district planning 
committee, to consist of three members, including one 
member of the school committee, to be appointed by the 
moderator in accordance with the provisions of Section 14 
of Chapter 71 of the General Laws, as amended, and to 
appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $200.00 for 
the expenses of this committee. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to acquire 
that tract of land, hereinafter described, belonging to 
Francis L. Bouchard and Monique G. Bouchard lying on 
the easterly side of Sunset Avenue in the Town, for a pub- 
lic way, and to appropriate and transfer the sum of $1.00 
from Surplus Revenue for said purpose. 

Said tract of land is described as follows : 

A certain parcel of land lying in the Town of Hat- 
field, Hampshire County, Massachusetts and being located 
on the easterly side of Sunset Avenue, so called, and more 
particularly bounded and described as follows : 

Beginning at an iron pin set in the easterly sideline 
of Sunset Avenue, so called, said iron pin being N. 19° 39' 
00" E. and 123.53' from a concrete monument set at the 
southeasterly intersection of the easterly sideline of Sun- 
set Avenue and the northerly boundary line of land now or 
formerly of Peter Kubosiak; thence running N. 19° 39' 
00" E. along the easterly sideline of Sunset Avenue 90.00' 
to a point; thence turning and running along a curve to 
the left which has a radius of 20.00' and along land of 
Francis L. & Monique G. Bouchard, a distance of 31.42' to 
a point; thence running S. 70° 21' 00" E. along other land 
of Francis L. & Monique G. Bouchard 64.76' to a point on 
line of land now or formerly of Anthony & Mary Kiel- 
bowicz ; thence running S. 19° 24' 41" W. along land now 
or formerly of Anthony & Mary Kielbowicz 50.00' to an 
iron pin at other land of Francis L. & Monique G. Bou- 
chard; thence running N. 70° 21' 00" W. along land of 



55 



Francis L. & Monique G. Bouchard 6.97' to an iron pin; 
thence running along a curve to the left which has a 
radius of 20.00' and running along land of Francis L. & 
Monique G. Bouchard a distance of 31.42' to an iron pin 
and the point of beginning. 

The above described parcel of land contains 4,416 
square feet, more or less. 

For further reference, see a plan entitled, "Land in 
Hatfield, Mass. to be Conveyed to the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Hatfield,"' dated November 20, 1968, Scale 1"=50' 
and prepared by Aimer Huntley, Jr. & Associates, Inc., 
Registered Land Surveyors & Civil Engineers, 238 Bridge 
Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Article 6. Voted to acquire that tract of land de- 
scribed in the Warrant for this meeting under this article 
belonging to Francis L. & Monique G. Bouchard lying on* 
the easterly side of Sunset Avenue in the Town, for a pub- 
lic way and to appropriate from. Surplus Revenue the sum 
of $1.00 for this purpose. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate and transfer the sum of $10,000.00 from Surplus Reve- 
nue to the Stabilization Fund. 

Article 7. Voted to appropriate from Surplus Reve- 
nue the sum of $10,000.00 to the Stabilization Fund. 



Attest: PETER S. ROGALESKI 

Town Clerk 



56 



Visiting Nurse Association 



HATFIELD VISITING NURSE 
EXPENSES AND RECEIPTS FOR 1968 

Balance as of January 1, 1968 $ 265.70 



Receipts : 

From Visiting Nurse 
From T6wn of Hatfield 
State Withholding 


290.00 

2,700.00 

2.68 




Total Receipts 

Expenses: 

Nurse's Salary 

Mileage 

Social Security 

Clerk 

Bank Charge 

Printing Checks 

Postage 


$ 

$2,800.00 

123.66 

123.12 

50.00 

1.15 

5.20 

1.92 


3,258.38 


Total Expenses 


$ 


3,105.05 


Balance as of January 1, 1969 


$ 


153.33 



MARGARET A. CANTWELL 

Treasurer 



57 



Report of the Fire Department 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

I wish to submit my fifth annual report of the Fire 
Department. 

I want to thank all the Firefighters for their splendid 
cooperation and quick response to all calls in the past 
year. 

I want to thank the citizens of Hatfield for their 
keeping down the amount of fires. I ask each and every 
citizen to use extreme caution and try to prevent all un- 
necessary fires. 

This year the Fire Department bought an 1800-Watt 
Generator, Smoke Ejector, Select-0 Stream Nozzles, Scott 
Air Pac and a set of 300-Watt Floodlights for the North 
Hatfield fire truck. This equipment will be a great help 
to the Fire Department in fighting fires. 

During 1968 the Fire Department was called out 62 
times which are as follows: 



Washing Machine 


1 


Car Fire 


3 


Chimney 


1 


Mutual Aid 


1 


House 


4 


Oil Burner Overflow 


2 


Was Gas off Road 


2 


Dump 


4 


Grass Fire 


17 



58 



Tobacco Barn 


3 


Television 


2 


Railroad 


4 


Summer Camp 
Cheese Cloth 


1 
6 


Baled Hay 
Mattress Fire 


1 
3 


Smoke Bomb 


1 


Truck Fire 


1 


Tobacco Barn Attempt 
Propane Gas 
Garage Fire 


3 

1 
1 



62 

There were 123 outdoor burning permits and 7 oil 
burner permits issued in 1968. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MYRON J. SIKORSKI 

Fire Chief 



59 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

I wish to submit my report for the year 1968. 

During the past year power line trimming was done 
throughout town by the Utility Companies. Other trim- 
ming and pruning was done by the Town Tree Department 
in the most hazardous areas of Maple St., Elm St., North 
St., School St., King St., Chestnut St., Gore Ave., Main 
St., North Hatfield Rd., Pantry Rd., Prospect St., Porter 
Ave., Bradstreet Depot Rd. and Dwight St. 

Thirty-seven young maple trees were planted and 
fertilized, as replacements and in new sites. 

Thirty-two stumps were removed, loamed over and 
seeded. 

All roadside trees were sprayed with Methoxychlor. 

Six trees infected with Dutch Elm disease were taken 
down and burned. 

Forty-five other trees were taken down because of 
-wind damage, fire damage, wood decay or hazardous con- 
ditions. Some assistance was given by Utility Companies 
on some of these trees, where power lines were involved. 

Tree Removals were as follows : 
Chestnut St., 3 Elms 
Main St., 13 Elms, 1 Maple 
North Hatfield Rd., 1 Elm, 1 Oak 



Bradstreet Depot Rd., 1 Oak, 1 Maple 

Pantry Rd., 2 Oaks 

School St., 2 Elms, 1 Maple 

North St., 1 Oak 

Elm St., 2 Elms, 1 Walnut 

Maple St., 2 Elms 

King St., 1 Elm 

Prospect St., 3 Elms 

Valley St., 1 Maple 

Little Neponsett, 2 Elms 

Linseed Rd., 2 Oaks 

Bashin Rd., 1 Elm 

Bridge St., 1 Maple 

Removed by Highway Department : 
Prospect St., Cutters' Corner: 

2 Maples, 2 Spruce, 2 Pine, 1 Oak 

A complete pruning and trimming job and removal 
of 1 Maple tree was done by the Cemetery Commission in 
Bradstreet Cemetery. Clean-up work was done by the 
Town Tree Department. 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCIS E. GODIN 

Tree Warden 



61 



Library Report 



To the Trustees of the Public Library 
and to the Citizens of Hatfield : 

I herewith submit this ninth annual report as Libra- 
rian of Hatfield. 

The library report for the year ending December 31, 
1968 shows a circulation of 36,072 books and periodicals 
which is an increase in both adult and juvenile circulation. 

The circulation was as follows: 

Juvenile fiction 13,137 

Juvenile non-fiction 6,558 

Adult fiction 12,257 

Adult non-fiction 4,120 

We borrowed 936 books from the State Bookmobile 
and 394 books from interlibrary loan. Interlibrary loan 
also borrowed 286 books from us. Interlibrary loan is a 
great help to our library patrons in getting the books they 
need that are not on our shelves. 

We added 540 books to the library during the year. 
For the magazines and books donated we are most grate- 
ful. RCA sent us a gift package of long-playing master- 
works. We now have a sizable collection of masterworks 
records in both stereo and mono which can be borrowed 
by any adult. 

Again we thank the Hatfield Book Club for their 
donation of money to buy books for the library and ma- 
terial for our summer reading program. 



62 



Interest in our summer reading program has grown 
considerably since its start. At the close of the program 
each year we hold a party for the participants. Stanley 
Malinowski, Jr. showed a film at the close of the club this 
year. 

The continued interest and co-operation of the teach- 
ers make its possible to have a poster and essay contest 
each year during National Library Week. 

Our story hours held every Tuesday during the sum- 
mer are very well attended. We are very grateful to our 
story tellers who were Miss Agnes Thorns of Northamp- 
ton, Mrs. Dorothy Polhemus of Whately, Mrs. Bieda, Mrs. 
Alice Johnson of Hatfield and college students, Gail Fitz- 
gerald, Sharron Olszewski, Sandra Smith, and Peggy 
Cantwell. 

During the year the trustees had a hand rail put on 
the steps going into the library and the inside of the 
library was painted. 

Our library is open Monday and Friday from 11:30 
A.M. to 2 :00 P.M. and from 6 :45 P.M. to 9 :00 P.M. and on 
Wednesday from 11:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 

In closing I sincerely thank Mrs. Helen Osley, Mrs. 
Doris Vollinger, the Trustees, teachers and townspeople 
for their interest, co-operation and assistance during the 
past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. CANTWELL 

Librarian 

63 



Police Report 



I respectfully submit the report of the Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1968. Also the 
number of arrests in the Town of Hatfield : 



Operating without license 


1 


Operating without registration 


2 


Operating without insurance 


2 


Minor liquor in motor vehicle 


1 


Motor vehicle equipment tags 


3 


Registry action 


2 


Speeding 


4 


Delinquent child 


2 


Larceny under $100.00 


1 


Breaking and entering in the daytime 


1 


Attempt breaking and entering in the 




night-time 


4 


State Institutions 


2 


Acicdents investigated 


17 


Summons served 


29 


Ambulance trips 


22 


All committed dog taxes collected 





HENRY J. SLIWOSKI 

Chief of Police 

64 



Report of the Water Department 



To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

The year 1968 was a good one for the Water Dept. 
with the exception of the latter part of September, when 
nearly three inches of rain fell on our watershed and ad- 
joining property, namely Swifts plantation. With the 
plantation being in the preparation stage of harrowing 
and seeding, the runoff from the plantation was quite 
muddy. All of this muddy water entered our watershed 
and reservoir and gave much concern to the Water Board. 

To alleviate this condition, the Water Board met with 
members of the Cons. Cigar Corp. to see what could be 
done to correct this situation. It was decided to build an 
earthen dam to contain this muddy water if the same 
thing happened again. 

Under the supervision of the Water Dept. a dam was 
constructed on the West and South sides of their property 
with a leach field on the Eastern end of the dam to let 
water out if it rose over a certain level. We think this will 
solve our problem of dirty water in the Spring or any time 
we have an overabundance of rain. 

The expense of this project was totally absorbed by 
the Cons. Cigar Corp., and they also agreed to maintain 
it in the future. 

The Board of Water Commissioners wish to thank 
the Cons. Cigar Corp. for their wholehearted cooperation 
with the Department for making this project a successful 
venture. 



65 



Of eleven samples of our water sent to the Mass. 
State Board of Public Health, the results were most grati- 
fying. All eleven showed that our water was up to their 
standards. 

In closing we wish to thank all the townspeople who 
have helped us in the past year, and we hope we can serve 
you to our best ability in the future. 

Please conserve water, it is a gem. 



Respectfully submitted, 

RUPERT HARUBIN, Chm. 
JOHN RUDY, Sec. 
MICHAEL BRUSCOE 

Water Commissioners 



66 



School Building Committee Report 



The Hatfield School Building Committee has held 32 
regular meetings and numerous conferences with the 
State Department of Education Staff in and out of Boston. 

It has also met with School and Town officials of 
neighboring communities in a dedicated effort to resolve 
Hatfield's school building needs. 

In the months of March through October, 1968, the 
Building Committee has been in contact on a weekly basis 
with the Department of Education in an all-out effort to 
find a responsible solution to Hatfield's school problem. 

Although progress has been at a slow pace, meetings 
were held with the Hadley Regional Planning Committee 
on October 24, 1968, October 31, 1968, November 21, 1968, 
and are being continued by the newly appointed Hatfield 
Regional Planning Committee in the hopes of reaching a 
solution that would be beneficial both to the children and 
the Town of Hatfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THADDEUS RABAT, Chm. 
JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI, Sec. 
RICHARD BELDEN 
MRS. ETHEL BYRNE 
WILLIAM H. BURKE, JR. 
STANLEY J. FILIPEK 
WILLIAM S. OLSZEWSKI 
JOSEPH V. PORADA, JR. 
EUGENE F. PROULX 
STANLEY SLIWOSKI 
RAYMOND RUSSELL 

School Building Committee 



67 



Recreation Commission 



The Hatfield Recreation Commission is completing its 
ninth successful year of operation in two activities to 
date, namely baseball and basketball. 

Last April, the annual registration for baseball was 
held and approximately eighty-five youths were signed up 
to play. The players were screened and the varsity team 
was selected first and represented Hatfield in the Frontier 
Youth League. The remaining players were divided into 
four teams and played intramural games for two rounds 
or six weeks. 

The Hatfield varsity team again participated with 
five other towns in the Frontier Youth League, namely, 
Conway, Old Deerfield, South Deerfield, Sunderland and 
Whately. The team won the first half of league competi- 
tion and tied in the second half. In a playoff game with 
South Deerfield, the Hatfield team won, thus clinching the 
Frontier Youth League championship. It was awarded 
the trophy at the annual league banquet. Since the pres- 
ent Hatfield group organized and entered in the Frontier 
League in 1960, it has been under the tutelage of James 
Mullins, Sr. and this past season was assisted by Fred 
Hanks. The nine-year record of the teams now stands at 
five championships, three as runner-up and once in fourth 
place. Although the 1968 varsity had the best record, plus 
a new diamond, the support was the poorest since start- 
ing. 

Hatfield also participated again for the third year in 
the Pioneer Valley Teen League. Other teams participat- 
ing were Hadley, North Hadley and Southampton. This 



68 



team was again coached by Americo "Zip" Zerneri and 
assisted by Fred Hanks. It ended in second place and its 
record for three seasons stands at two championships and 
one as runner-up. 

With the arrival of November, basketball registration 
was held with approximately ninety youth registering. 
The players were again divided into two groups, namely 
Grades 3-5 and Grades 6-8. At present there are five 
teams in the younger group and four teams in the older 
group. 

For the second year, Hatfield was entered in the area 
basketball league for Grades 3-5. This is also under the 
Pioneer Valley Teen League with Peter Kotch as Hatfield 
coach and James Mullins, Sr. as a referee. Towns in this 
league are Amherst, Hadley, and Southampton as well as 
Hatfield. Games are played on Saturday afternoons in 
Hadley. 

The new baseball diamond and backstop which were 
started in the fall of 1967 were completed in the Spring 
of 1968 after many hours of hard volunteer work. 

A general meeting was held in January 1969 in which 
an ice rink was discussed and a recreation program for 
girls taken up. A volunteer committee is being organized 
in an effort to have a rink in the winter of 1969-70 and a 
committee of ladies is working on a program of activities 
for the girls. 

We wish to again repeat our annual appeal that in 
order for all these activities to stay in operation and con- 
tinue successfully, coaches and other volunteer helpers are 
always needed. We would like to thank all those who have 
assisted in the past. 



69 



We would again like to express our deep gratitude to 
all groups and individuals for their help and support in 
the past and look forward to their continued help and sup- 
port in the future. 



Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY P. BETSOLD, Pres. 
BERNARD J. ROSIER, Vice Pres. 
THOMAS P. MULLINS, Sec.-Treas. 
JAMES M. MULLINS, SR. 
FREDERICK G. HANKS 



70 



Sewer Commissioners' Report 



The new sewer rodding machine was received and put 
into use. The mains throughout the system were cleaned 
out and silt from the floods was loosened and removed. 
This work alone will increase the capacity of the mains 
substantially and should reduce the continuous problems 
on Main Street. 

The State Department of Natural Resources, which 
now has full say in sewer matters, has decreed that we 
must have a mechanical plant to meet the requirements 
of the "Clean Waters Act." As a result, articles have been 
prepared for the annual Town Meeting to meet the stipu- 
lations of this Act. 

Under current aid programs of State and matching 
Federal funds, we can expect no more than 75 per cent aid 
on those parts of the system which are directly concerned 
with sewerage treatment. These are the King Street 
pumping station and force main, the Maple Street pump- 
ing station and the force main to the treatment plant and 
the treatment plant and its outfall. All other parts of the 
study made by Tighe & Bond would have to be built by 
the Town alone. 

At joint meetings of the Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee and Sewer Committee, it was decided to seek 
funds to build only those parts of the system deemed 
eligible under the State program. The articles presented 
with this year's Warrant amount to $269,000.00, for which 
the authority to purchase bonds will be sought. Of this, 
$194,500.00 will be provided by the State and Federal 



71 



agencies before the contract is signed. As the land needed 
to construct the treatment plant is not eligible for aid, the 
Town's share comes to more than a straight 25 per cent. 

Three parcels of land will be requested in this War- 
rant. The prices established are by an independent ap- 
praiser as is required by the Attorney General. 

The Elm Street leaching field was cleaned and re- 
paired. Some improvements were incorporated there to 
reduce the upkeep in the future. 



Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD W. DRURY, Chm. 
JOHN A. BETSOLD 
FRANCIS H. HEBERT 

Sewer Commissioners 



72 



Board of Appeals Report 



The Board holds regular meetings on the first 
Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P.M. at the Town Hall 
Selectmen's Room. 

Public hearings on petitions for variances, special 
permits, and appeals are scheduled as needed. 

The Board of Appeals has held seven (7) public hear- 
ings during 1968. 

It is the intent of the Board to render decisions where 
desirable, relief may be granted without detriment to the 
public good, and without substantially changing the in- 
tent of the zoning by-laws of the Town of Hatfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 

THADDEUS KABAT, Chm. 
LEON MAXIMOWSKI, Clk. 
ROBERT POLHEMUS 
HAROLD LYMAN, Alt. 
THOMAS YARROWS, Alt. 



Board of Appeals 



73 



Plumbing Inspector's Report 



To All Residents of Hatfield: 

A uniform State Plumbing Code is compulsory in 
each town which has two thousand inhabitants or more. 
An inspector (registered plumber), subject to the approv- 
al of the Board of State Examiners of Plumbers, Room 
1503, State Office Building, Government Center, 100 Cam- 
bridge St., Boston, is appointed by the Board of Health 
to inspect the construction, alteration or repair relative 
to the plumbing practice. 

The new Code was not received enthusiastically, but 
the basic sanitary and safety principles desirable are nec- 
essary to protect the health of people everywhere. 

For the benefit of all concerned, I would like to re- 
peat the article that appeared in our local newspapers on 
11/21/68.: 

On and after November first of this year (1968) all 
plumbing construction within the limits of Hatfield will 
have to be installed by a licensed plumber, registered with 
the Board of State Examiners of Plumbers. 

Any person not licensed and registered by the Board 
of Examiners who performs plumbing work, whether 
minor or extensive, will be fined. Permits now required on 
all new homes or businesses or new installations in older 
dwellings or buildings will be issued to licensed plumbers 
onlv. 



74 



Permits for new construction or alterations of indi- 
vidual sewerage disposal systems must also be obtained. 
A percolation test must be performed before the permit 
for construction is granted. The homeowner or the land- 
owner is responsible for the test. The permit for the 
sewerage disposal systems shall be obtained by the in- 
staller who must be licensed or recognized by the local 
Board of Health. 

A fee of four dollars will be charged for each permit 
granted. 

For example: 

New construction — two permits, two inspections 
1 — roughing 
1 — finishing 

Alterations or addition — one permit, one inspection 

The following permits were granted by me from 
November 1, 1968 to December 31, 1968 : 

Disposal Works Construction Permit: 
Construct 7 

Plumbing of Building: 

Entire New Building 3 

Additional Alteration 2 



Respectfully submitted 

RENE LABBE 

Plumbing Inspector 



75 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1968 



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82 



Report of Town Accountant 



RECEIPTS 

GENERAL REVENUE 



Taxes 

Personal 1968 

Real Estate 1968 

Trailer 1968 

Personal Prev. Years 

Real Estate Prev. Years 

In Lieu of Taxes Prev. Years 


$ 22,500.00 

305,855.70 

732.00 

2,211.56 

65,996.43 

126.50 

$ 


397,422.19 


Motor Vehicle Excise: 
Levy of 1968 
Previous Years 


$ 54,820.16 
17,108.20 


71,928.36 






Farm and Machinery Excise: 
Levy of 1968 
Previous Years 


$ 602.50 
37.00 


639.50 
4,961.00 


Sewer Tax: 
Levy of 1968 
Previous Years 


$ 3,906.00 
1,055.00 






Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 
Business Corporation 
Meal Tax 
State Tax Basis 
Chap. 70 G. L. (Schools) 


$ 119.12 

296.20 

47,170.00 

44,307.03 


91,892.35 






Licenses and Permits: 
Liquor 
All Other 


$ 6,600.00 
259.50 


6,859.50 
204.00 


Court Fines 





83 



RECEIPTS 






Grants from Federal Government: 






Aid to Dependent Children 


$ 66.00 




Medical Assistance 


11,483.36 




Old Age Assistance 


1,703.98 




Public Law 864 


971.95 




Public Law 874 


11,074.00 




Public Law 88-210 


506.00 




Public Law 89-10 


3,359.00 




School Lunch 


9,811.07 


38,975.36 






Grants from Commonwealth: 






Free Public Library 


$ 587.50 


' 


School Transportation 


9,545.21 




Highway Chap. 81 


10,983.63 


21,116.34 






Grants from Hampshire County: 






Dog Licenses 




152.14 


Dog Disposal 




136.00 


Total General Government 


I 


634,286.74 



DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 



Board of Selectmen: 








Sale Various Articles 


$ 


241.00 




Liquor Ads 




75.00 








■ $ 


316.00 


Police Dept. 






118.00 


Sewer Connection 






100.00 


Highways: 








Chapter 90 Maint. — State 


$ 


1,000.00 




Chapter 90 Maint. — County 




1,000.00 




Chapter 90 New Construction - 


- State 


9,100.00 




Chapter 90 New Construction - 


- County 


4,550.00 




Machinery Fund 




2,752.50 




Individuals 




96.50 


1ft aqq nn 



84 



RECEIPTS 

Public Welfare: 

General Relief — State 
Aid to Dependent Children — State 
Old Age Assistance — State 
Medical Assistance — State 


$ 80.19 

34.89 

840.68 

8,116.81 


9,072.57 
2,886.37 


Veterans* Benefits 





Schools: 
Athletic Receipts $ 2,039.88 

School Lunch Coll. 23,010.89 



25,050.77 

Library Fines 114.44 
School Construction — Chap. 645 

Acts of '48 6,654.55 

Compensation — State Withholding 49.82 

Board of Appeals 50.00 

Dividend — purchases 3.30 



Water Department: 
Collections $ 22,939.20 

New Services 500.00 

Hydrant Damages 267.24 

23,706.44 



Care of Cemetery Lots 164.75 



General Interest : 






Interest on Taxes 


$ 5,927.75 




Interest on Motor Vehicle Excise 


862.26 




Advertising 


84.01 


6,874.02 






Deed 




8.50 


Interest on Trust Funds 




1,151.11 


Total Commercial Revenue 


$ 


94,819.64 



85 



RECEIPTS 

AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 



Dog Licenses Due County 


$ 465.00 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


355.00 


Federal Withholding Tax 


43,373.80 


Retirement 


4,625.69 


State Withholding Tax 


5,773.80 


Blue Cross 


7,971.74 


Teachers' Health and Accident 


783.12 


Teachers' Annuity 


400.00 




$ 63,748.15 


Refunds 


1,611.58 


Cash on Hand 1/1/68 


288,333.27 


TOTAL 


$ 1,082,799.38 



86 






PAYMENTS 








GENERAL GOVERNMENT 




Moderator 




* 


25.00 


Selectmen : 








Salaries 






2,100.00 


Clerk 






400.00 


Expenses : 








Printing, Postage, Stationery- 


$ 


176.95 




Travel 




27.85 




Advertising 




130.20 




Dues 




105.16 




All Other 




5.00 


445 16 


Accounting: 






«±*J6W. ±\f 


Salary- 






3,475.00 


Expenses: 








Printing, Postage, Stationery 


$ 


156.99 




Dues 




5.00 


161.99 


Treasurer : 






Salary 






3,712.00 


Expenses : 








Printing, Postage, Stationery 


$ 


236.29 




Clerical 




285.00 




Bond 




170.00 




Dues 




4.00 


695 29 


Collector: 






XJiJ Vifli 


Salary 






2,410.00 


Expenses : 








Clerical 


$ 


729.30 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 




391.69 




Surety Bond 




330.00 




All Other 




12.50 


1,463.49 








Assessors : 








Salaries 






2,900.00 


Expenses : 








Clerical 


$ 


230.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 




249.24 





87 



PAYMENTS 






Travel 


30.60 




All Other 


56.40 


556.24 
10.00 


Elector Under Oliver Smith Will 




Finance Committee: 






Dues 




20.00 


Town Counsel 




1,320.00 


Town Clerk: 






Salary 




3,602.00 


Expenses: 






Recording Fees 


$ 125.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


155.10 




Surety Bond 


15.00 




Clerical 


235.00 




Dues 


10.00 


540.10 


Election and Registration: 






Registrars 


$ 360.00 




Election Officers 


762.00 




Clerical 


220.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


133.01 




Street Lists 


577.00 


2,052.01 






Planning Board Expense 




48.00 


Appeals Board : 






Clerical 


$ 28.00 




Printing, Postage, Stationery 


16.26 




Advertising 


78.20 


122.46 


Town Hall : 






Janitor 


$ 3,550.00 




Fuel 


2,009.05 




Lights 


1,288.29 




Janitor's Supplies 


369.27 




Repairs 


1,039.25 




Equipment Repair 


102.00 




All Other 


46.80 


8,404.66 






Town Hall Repair Account 




2,025.15 



Total General Government $ 36,498.55 



PAYMENTS 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



Police Department: 






Chief 


$ 3,600.00 




Men 


836.00 




Insurance 


435.00 




Printing, Postage 


125.19 




New Equipment and Supplies 


93.69 




Gas, Oil, Tires 


439.83 




Repair Two-Way Radio 


34.75 




All Other 


44.50 


5,608.96 






Fire Department: 






Chief 


$ 450.00 




Clerk 


150.00 




Men 


1,067.00 




Dues 


10.00 




New Equipment and Supplies 


1,521.07 




Gas, Oil, & Grease 


160.42 




Repairs 


387.59 




Fuel 


233.69 




Light 


59.13 




Rent 


360.00 




Repair Two-Way Radio 


34.65 




Telephone 


407.42 




All Other 


73.49 


4,914.46 






Gas Inspector Salary 




200.00 


Tree Work 




2,984.37 


Moth Work 




2,800.00 


Civil Defense 




203.50 


Total Public Safety 


$ 


16,711.29 


HEALTH AND SANITATION 




Well-Child Clinic 




160.00 


Immunization — School Children 




45.00 


Insp. School Children — Tuberculosis 




20.00 


Visiting Nurse 




2,700.00 


Insp. Animals and Slaughtering 




330.00 



PAYMENTS 






Sewer Department : 






Sewer Commissioners' Salaries 




500.00 


Sewer Maintenance : 






Labor $ 


1,037.45 




Supplies 


104.95 




Engineering Services 


442.56 




Postage, Printing, Stationery 


170.02 




Collector's Bond 


10.00 




Clerical 


88.25 




All Other 


16.20 


1,869.43 






Clean and Repair Elm Street Sewage 






Disposal Plant: 






Labor $ 


1,083.60 




Loam 


292.50 




Pipe 


41.65 


1,417.75 






Update '60 Eng. Report on Sewage Plant & 






Survey Proposed Sewage Treatment Site 




1,398.82 


Purchase Sewer Cleaning Machine 




4,794.15 


Survey & Appraise Sewage Treatment 






Site in Bradstreet 




110.00 


Total Health and Sanitation 


$ 


13,345.15 



HIGHWAYS 






Highway General: 






Labor 


% 3,425.79 




Telephone 


180.54 




Fuel 


149.87 




Lights 


54.68 




Misc. Equipment and Supplies 


997.55 




Rent of Dump 


200.00 




Rodent Control at Dump 


130.00 




All Other 


168.78 




Snow Removal — Wages 


4,818.00 




Snow Removal — Sidewalks 


294.00 


10,419.21 






Bridge Repair 




1,700.00 


Fence Repairs 




96.75 



90 






PAYMENTS 

Dike Repairs 105.40 

Street Lights 6,289.71 

Purchase Sidewalk Tractor 5,427.51 

Survey Land for Dump 350.20 

Land Purchase — Dump 3,000.00 

Highway Chap. 81 : 

Labor $ 15,115.55 

Town Machinery 1,088.00 

Asphalt and Patch 3,687.95 

Sand and Gravel 345.00 

Snow Removal — Sand 781.39 

Snow Removal — Salt 779.26 

21,797.15 



3,000.00 



Highway Chap. 90 Maintenance: 
Labor 
Asphalt 
Paint 


$ 


961.20 

1,739.26 

299.54 


Highway Chap. 90 N. C. : 
Labor 

Town Machinery 
Other Machinery 
Gravel 
Loam 
Asphalt 
All Other 


$ 


7,594.50 
1,664.50 
949.50 
585.50 
247.50 
3,620.96 
173.62 


Machinery Operating: 
Parts and Repairs 
Gas 


$ 


3,105.04 
1,487.86 



14,836.08 



4,592.90 
Total Highways $ 71,614.91 



CHARITIES AND VETERANS' BENEFITS 

Salary of Agent $ 2,080.00 

General Relief: 

Groceries $ 174.93 

Medicine & Medical Attendance 71.20 



91 



PAYMENTS 



Cash Aid to Indiv 
Travel 


iduals 
Children 

VETERANS' BENI 

SCHOOLS 

vel 

iers 

cipal 
etc. 

>f Children 

- Repairs 

- Gas & Oil 

ketball Team 


48.00 
16.56 


310 fiQ 


Aid to Dependent C 
Medical Assistance 
Old Age Assistance 




OJ-W.U«7 

82.50 

22,268.93 

2,359.10 


Total Charities 

Salary of Agent 
Dues 
Postage 
Medical Aid 
Aid 


$■ 

:fits 

1 400.00 

5.00 

16.00 

3,557.92 

2,309.20 


27,101.22 
6,288.12 

9,002.61 

241,382.76 

13,194.74 

2,297.92 

1,000.00 

435.49 


Admini strations: 
Superintendent 
Clerical 
Office Expense 
Travel 
Out of State Tra 


$ 4,429,12 

2,685.27 

1,181.42 

450.72 

256.08 


Instruction : 

Salaries — Teacr. 
High Principal 
Elementary Prin 
Books, Supplies, 


$205,480.68 

8,339.63 

10,461.06 

17,101.39 


Transportation : 
Transportation c 
School Vehicles - 
School Vehicles - 


$ 13,062.00 
81.11 
51.63 


Athletic Expense 
Boston Trip — Bas 
Driver Ed. Expense 





92 



PAYMENTS 






Operation : 






Janitors' Salaries $ 


14,057.17 




Heat, Light, Janitors' Supplies 


12,301.56 




Repairs 


4,065.49 


30,424.22 
3,876.93 


New Equipment 




Equipment Repairs 




376.58 


Insurance 




477.50 


Nurse's Salary 




3,162.50 


Health Expenses — Supplies, Mileage 




133.75 


Total Paid from Town Appropriation 


$ 


305,765.00 


Public Law #874 (Federal Funds) 






Payments: 






Superintendent $ 


204.16 




Clerk 


109.05 




Teachers' Salaries 


10,028.30 




High Principal 


377.03 




Elementary Principal 


476.54 




Nurse's Salary 


137.50 




Janitors' Salaries 


697.05 




Office Expense 


111.51 




Books, Supplies, Etc. 


509.98 




School Vehicles — Gas 


30.60 




Transportation of Children 


1,292.00 




Athletic Expense 


427.95 




Driver Ed. Expense 


34.10 




Heat, Light, Jan. Supplies 


2,354.45 




New Equipment 


732.00 




Health Expense — Mileage 


2.88 


17,525.16 






Public Law #864 




1,147.45 


Public Law — #88-210 




506.00 


Public Law — #89-10 (Remedial Reading) 




4,709.74 


Athletic Fund 




1,656.97 


School Committee Expense 




877.95 


School Bldg. Comm. Expense 




156.53 


School Physician 




600.00 


Vocational School Tuition & Transportation 


$ 


19,493.86 


Total Schools 


352,438.66 



93 



PAYMENTS 

SCHOOL LUNCH 

Clerk $ 1,066.00 

Wages 11,417.00 

Food 20,838.56 

Fuel 53.25 

Misc. Supplies 487.71 

New Equipment 171.69 

Equipment Repairs 40.57 

Travel Expense 38.47 

Bond 10.00 

Insurance 17.00 



LIBRARY 


Librarian 


$ 2,475.00 


Asst. Librarians 


1,883.50 


Janitor Service 


399.00 


Books 


1,791.94 


Periodicals 


135.29 


Binding Books 


34.83 


Fuel 


293.67 


Lights 


183.24 


Misc. Supplies 


96.86 


Equipment 


99.95 


Repairs 


702.65 


Postage 


17.10 


Travel 


8.25 



34.140.25 



8,121.31 

Recreation 1,293.41 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Telephone $ 306.30 

Memorial Day 461.34 

Care of Town Clock 37.50 

Printing & Delivering Town Report 1,082.00 
Lower Pioneer Valley Planning 

District Assessment 188.00 

Unclassified 140.64 

Hampshire County Sanatorium Assessment 2,923.87 

Tercentenary Committee 3,500.00 



94 



PAYMENTS 

Unpaid Bills 196.10 

Unpaid Bills — Chap. 44 Sec. 64 217.89 

Dog Disposal 153.00 

Purchase Copy Machine 451.67 

Tax Title 12.00 
Participation Sunderland, Worthington 

Anniversaries 190.95 

Purchase or Take Land: 

Wm. & Marcus Boyle 100.00 

Joseph & Agnes Wendlowski 100.00 

Alan & Phyllis Cameron 200.00 

Josephine Donnis 50.00 

Meyer Mendelsohn, Inc. 200.00 

Francis & Monique Bourque 1.00 

Room Rental American Legion Post 344 1,000.00 

Stabilization Fund 10,000.00 

Retirement Assessment 5,338.25 

Electrify Town Clock 2,446.93 



INSURANCE 




Town Schedule 


$ 4,179.00 


Monies and Securities 


75.00 


Liability, Property Damage — Vehicles 


1,864.22 


Workmen's Compensation 


2,550.00 


Public Liability 


511.00 


Volunteer Firemen 


202.50 


Town Hall Liability 


359.00 



Maintenance : 






Collector's Salary 


$ 


819.35 


Clerical 




220.00 


Printing, Postage, Stationery 




45.06 


Bond 




10.00 


Labor 




2,461.28 


Repairs, Gas and Oil — Truck 




150.23 



29,297.44 



9,740.72 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

Water Commissioners' Salaries $ 900.00 



95 



PAYMENTS 

Pipe and Fittings 3,213.49 

Equipment Rentals 117.00 

Lights 480.84 

Care of Chlorinator 600.00 

Chlorine 286.00 

All Other 338.06 

8,741.31 

12" Line — Linseed Rd. and Dwight St. 1,363.78 

North Main Street Extension 728.14 



Total Water Department $ 11,733.23 



CEMETERIES 

Clerk | 75.00 

Postage 8.00 

Labor 1,100.00 

Trim Trees, etc. 160.00 

All Other 20.10 



School Loan 
Water Loan 


INTEREST 


§ 9,000.00 
510.00 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

School Loans $ 20,000.00 

Water Loan 4,000.00 





REFUNDS 






Taxes 







2,253.23 


Motor Vehicle Jhccise 






1,191.44 


Sewer 






19.00 



1,363.10 



9,510.00 



24,000.00 



3,463.67 



96 



PAYMENTS 






AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 




State Audit Tax 


$ 61.46 




State Parks Tax 


2,559.14 




State Assessment — M. V. Excise Bills 


293.55 




County Tax 


33,110.81 




Dog Licenses for County 


465.00 




Cemetery Perpetual Care — New Funds 


355.00 




Cemetery Perpetual Care — Interest 


10.88 




Federal Withholding 


43,363.80 




State Withholding 


5,773.80 




Retirement 


4,635.69 




Blue Cross 


14,151.24 




Insurance 


1,236.04 




Teachers' Health & Accident 


783.12 




Teachers' Annuity 


400.00 


107,199.53 






Total Payments 


$ 


763,860.56 


Balance 1/1/69 




318,938.82 


TOTAL 


$ 1,082,799.38 



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103 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1968 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Stanley J. Sliwoski, Chairman Term Expires 1970 

Ethel I. Byrne, Secretary Term Expires 1969 

Edward P. Zima Term Expires 1970 

John W. Filipek Term Expires 1971 

Raymond Russell Term Expires 1969 

Regular school committee meetings are held 

at the high school 

on the second Monday of each month 

or at a time convenient to the members of 

the school committee 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

John A. Skarzynski 

School Office : Home Address : 

High School Building 1 King Street 

Telephone : 247-5614 Hatfield, Mass. 

WORK CERTIFICATES AND SCHOOL CLERK 

Mare P. Sheehan 

57 Chestnut Street 

Office telephone 247-5614 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Robert C. Byrne, M.D. 

83 Main Street 

Telephone 247-5661 

Alfred J. Kaiser, M.D. 

22 School Street 

Telephone 247-5751 



107 



SCHOOL NURSE 

Mrs. Lucille Godek, R.N. 
23 Prospect Street 
Telephone 247-5916 



CORPS OF TEACHERS 1968 - 1969 



Superintendent of Schools and Principal of 
Smith Academy 

John A. Skarzynski 
Driver Education 



Smith Academy 

Leonard A. Yarrows, Assistant Principal 
Math, Science 

Florence E. Muller 
Language and Guidance 

Margaret E. Pruzynski 
Commercial Subjects 

Mary A. Spakowski 
Science, Jr. Business Math 

Richard J. Sadoski 
Commercial Subjects 

Richard M. Cechvala 

English, Math 

Soccer and Girls' Basketball Coach 

Alan C. Copithorne 
Social Studies 

Lorraine R. Worle 
English, Humanities 



108 



Center School — Junior High 

Grades 7, 8, 9 

Dorothy Breor — Prncipal 

Jean Kempisty, Assistant Principal 
Social Studies, Music 

Maxwell Moczulewski 
Math 

Joseph F. Savage 
Reading, English 

Colleen A. Sirvint 
French 

Richard P. Rost 

Science 

Jr. High Basketball Coach 

Jr. High Baseball Coach 

James A. Devlin 

English, Latin 

Faculty Manager 

Frank E. Abarno 

Social Studies, Math 

Jr. High Soccer Coach 

J.V. Basketball Coach 

Thomas J. Haley 
English, Reading 

Elementary School 

Dorothy Breor — Principal 

Grade 6 
Frances Celatka Lois Rost 

Grade 5 
Cynthia Tessier Virginia Klaes 

Grade 4 
Hilda Fortsch Patricia Klaes 



109 



Ann Labbee 
Eleanor Stenglein 
Beverly Curtis 



Grade 3 
Grade 2 
Grade 1 



Mary Lu Hutchinson 

Susan Blanchette 

Elaine Nelson 



Kindergarten 

Anne Carey 

Martha Boyle 

Remedial Reading 

Supervisors 

Music — Lois Smith 
Penmanship — William Rinehart Co. 
Art — Joyce Wichowski 

David Jekanoski 

Physical Education, Baseball and 

High School Basketball Coach 

Custodians 

Elementary — Mitchell Kempisty 

Center School — Chester Celatka 

High School 



John W. Maroney 
Frank Skroski, Jr. - 



Transporters 

— Regular School Transportation 
-Vocational School Transportation 



School Lunch Workers 

Winifred Betsold, Manager Hazel Roberts, Asst. Mgr. 
Wanda Shea Mary Vachula 

Bertha Kosakowski Phyllis Kuzontkoski 

Mary Winters Helen Rudy 



110 



Report of the School Committee 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield : 

The School Committee once again urges the citizens 
to move with all possible haste to provide school facilities 
for our student population. The fact that our accredita- 
tion and membership with the New England Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools is in jeopardy and the 
lack of progress in providing proper educational facilities 
are serious problems for our educational system and our 
graduates. This next year will require more effort and 
more thought and action for all the citizens of Hatfield 
than any of the preceding years. All decisions made in re- 
lation to physical facilities must be made with the best 
long-run interest of the students in mind. 

Despite the drawbacks of the above, the Hatfield 
School Committee has made every attempt to provide a 
system and program needed by our children in these try- 
ing times and will continue in its efforts to provide the 
best education possible. 

In reviewing the past year, the school committee held 
11 regular meetings and 13 special meetings during the 
year. 

A complete list of school personnel can be found in 
another section of this report. In reviewing the teaching 
staff situation, we found changes took place in the school 
system in the following areas : 

Mrs. Rose Sarti, resigned, to further education. 
Mrs. Bernadette Wyman, resigned, to be at home. 



Ill 



Miss Coral Bissonnette, resigned, moved to another 

area. 
Mr. John Naumowicz, resigned, employed by East- 

hampton. 
Mrs. Anne Carey, elected kindergarten teacher. 

Mrs. Susan Blanchette, elected teacher in elementary 

school. 
Mrs. Lois Rost, elected teacher in elementary school. 

Mrs. Martha Boyle, reassigned, remedial reading 

teacher. 
Mr. Thomas Haley, elected teacher in Center Junior 

High School. 

Mrs. Lorraine Worle, elected teacher in Smith Acad- 
emy. 
Mrs. Joyce Wichowski, elected art instructor. 

There are presently 30 full-time teachers, 2 adminis- 
trators, 3 part-time supervisors, one specialist, one part- 
time school nurse, one secretary,and 3 custodians on the 
staff. 

The school committee has spent many hours and has 
given careful study to the budget and believes its request 
is a minimum to operate the school system efficiently and 
successfully in 1969. The Hatfield Finance Board and the 
School Committee have met and discussed the school 
budget. With the approval of the budget by both bodies, 
the school committee will make every effort to provide an 
adequate educational program. Your attention is directed 
to the financial section which also includes reimburse- 
ments to the town. 

In keeping with school committee policy, bids are pre- 
pared, advertised, and publicly opened by the school com- 
mittee for the following purchases and contracts: bus 
(regular and vocational) , fuel, milk, and bread. Contracts 



112 



this past year were awarded to the following concerns: 
Vocational School bus transportation — Skroski Bus Com- 
pany ; oil contracts — Norwood Oil Co. for both # 2 and #4 
fuel oil ; bread — Dreikom's Bakery ; and milk — Kentfield 
Dairy. The regular school transportation contract is held 
by the Maroney Bus Company and is effective through 
June 1969. 

Special attention is given to the maintenance and re- 
pair of the school buildings and grounds, not only during 
the school year, but during the summer as well. Besides 
the ordinary maintenance, the following programs were 
carried out: Elementary School: the heating system was 
repaired, hardtop was sealed, all the classrooms and out- 
side doors were painted, outside windows were primed, 
and wardrobe doors in three rooms were replaced. At the 
Junior High School two rooms were painted, the roof was 
repaired and the outside doors were painted. The basket- 
ball bleachers were also painted. 

The Trustees of Smith Academy carried out neces- 
sary maintenance and repairs to the Academy building. 
The roof and windows were repaired and the gutters 
cleaned, painting and paneling was done, a new ceiling was 
installed in the home economics room and shelving was 
built in the office. Those repairs were taken care of with- 
out cost to the town. The trustees have been very coopera- 
tive in maintaining the building and deserve a vote of 
appreciation. 

The following pieces of new equipment were added to 
the school system : complete furnishing of the kindergar- 
ten room, student chairs and desks, 4 typewriters, a 16mm 
film projector, two 10-key adding machines, furniture for 
the Junior High School teachers' room, and an electric 
wall screen. 

The school committee has endorsed participation of 
the local school system in many federal programs which 



113 



include PL 89-10 Titles I and II, Vocational and Business 
Act, PL 864 Titles III and V-A, PL 874, and the Neighbor- 
hood Youth Corps program. It is certain that by partici- 
pating in these programs the Hatfield Public Schools have 
been able to extend their educational program. The school 
committee is also aware that much effort is exerted by the 
administrative offices for the programs to materialize. 

The school committee continues to endorse and sup- 
port related educational programs for the youth of the 
town, including Youth baseball and basketball programs, 
Boy Scouts, and sewing clubs. 

The school committee maintains an active member- 
ship in the area, state, and national associations and at- 
tends their meetings regularly. 

Pupil insurance is offered to parents on a voluntary 
basis at reasonable rates, as is the school savings program, 
and parents should give serious consideration to partici- 
pating in the programs. At the opening of the school year, 
information concerning the programs is made available. 

The school committee is grateful to Labbee Chevrolet 
for making a car available for its Driver Education pro- 
gram in the high school. 

The school committee is pleased to acknowledge the 
interest of the following citizens and civic clubs in the edu- 
cation of our students. The following honors are awarded 
to deserving members of the high school graduating class : 

American Legion Post Awards 

Hatfield Book Club Annual Literary Award 

Lions Club Award 

Woman's Endeavor Society Award 

M. Larkin Proulx Award 



114 



Woman's Club of the Holy Trinity Catholic Church 
Award 

Suzanne M. Novak Memorial Award 

The Parent-Teachers Council Awards 

Hatfield Teachers Club Awards 

Hatfield Junior Drum Corps Awards 

Patricia Zembiski Memorial Award 

American Legion Auxiliary Post Award 

Northampton Cosmetologists Association Scholarship 
Award 

Both the superintendent's and elementary- junior high 
principal's reports carry a more detailed account of the 
activities of the Hatfield Public Schools. These reports 
were read and approved by the school committee and your 
atteniton is called to them. The committee also directs 
your attention to the Hatfield School Buildinng Committee 
report. 

As we look forward to another year, we recognize 
that overcrowding and lack of facilities is one of our major 
problems and we hope that the people of Hatfield will sup- 
port the efforts of the Building Committee in their impor- 
tant task of providing school facilities. 

The committee wishes to express its appreciation for 
services rendered, to a former member of the school 
board, Mr. Henry F. Kulesza, who retired from the school 
board in February 1968. 

In conclusion, the school committee wishes to express 
its thanks to members of the school department, town offi- 
cers and departments, civic clubs and townspeople for 



115 



their help and assistance in making the school year of 
1968 a rewarding one and looks forward to their continued 
support and assistance. 



Respectfully submitted, 



STANLEY J. SLIWOSKI 
ETHEL I. BYRNE 
JOHN W. FILIPEK 
EDWARD P. ZIMA 

School Committee 



116 



Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and the 
Citizens of Hatfield: 

In accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth 
and the policies of the Hatfield School Committee, I hereby 
submit my eleventh annual report as Superintendent of 
Schools of Hatfield. 

In reviewing the past reports of the Superintendent 
of Schools, one finds that the need for space was first 
brought to your attention in the report for the year 1963. 
Once again the most critical problem for the school de- 
partment is space and adequate facilities. Simply by 
checking enrollments we find we are in difficulty in two of 
our school buildings. A solution to the problem on the sec- 
ondary level would definitely ease the problem for the near 
future. However, each year the problem grows worse and 
we could face double sessions, temporary classrooms, and 
possibly an inadequate program. Unfortunately for the 
Town of Hatfield, it could have solved the problem when 
the construction of a new high school was presented for 
approval in 1964, but the proposal was voted down by the 
majority of the voters present. Now it appears that this 
is not a problem which our citizens can solve. If it were, 
I'm sure you would see some type of construction taking 
place. However, the State Department of Education has 
told the Building Committee to seek regionalization first. 
Hatfield has met with its neighbors to discuss the possi- 
bility of regionalization but either they were not inter- 
ested or not ready and so we are presently unable to solve 
our problem through regionalization. Even though the 
state has refused to give us permission to build, they have 



117 



not found us a partner. It appears now that if we don't 
solve our problem alone, we will have to sit and wait until 
one of our neighbors finds it has a serious building prob- 
lem of its own and will meet with Hatfield ; then there will 
be hope of a solution. In the meantime our pupils could 
suffer by not having available proper educational facili- 
ties. Nevertheless the school committee, administrators, 
and staff have, and will continue to make every effort to 
see that fine instruction will continue to take place in our 
schools. Diligent efforts are being made by your repre- 
sentatives to find proper solutions. Though slow progress 
is oftentimes discouraging, efforts must continue. Our rec- 
ommendation is to get the job done as soon as possible, 
and to include facilities that will provide our students with 
the best possible. Every responsible citizen should realize, 
too, these delays are extremely costly both from the edu- 
cational viewpoint and the costs of construction. We must 
realize that costs rise about 8% every year and to post- 
pone the inevitable will just be that much more costly. 

Without the leadership of the school committee, we 
would not have achieved what we have today. We are in 
hopes of continued support so that we can maintain our 
present program and continue to make every effort to im- 
prove or add in the future. 

The establishment of a kindergarten was a significant 
development of educational achievement. The program is 
progressing smoothly and will serve the needs of the chil- 
dren at this level. 

Art was made available on a two-day/week basis, 
with a very capable instructor in charge. Her innovations 
with materials on hand have been many and valuable. 

Our textbooks, pupil supplies and equipment are in a 
most enviable condition. Our library books and reference 
shelves are improving. Subject guides for the junior and 



118 



senior high schools were revised and brought up to date. 
The courses offered in our high school meet the require- 
ments of a good high school as outlined by the State De- 
partment of Education. Also, many of our graduates are 
doing well in college, as indicated by the reports received 
in the high school office. A very important phase of school 
life beyond the daily classroom learning process is the ac- 
tivity period and after-school activities. Although our pro- 
gram is not as strong as we would like it to be, I'm sure it 
will improve in time. Some of these experiences relate to 
the students' immediate needs, some prepare them for fur- 
ther education, and others carry over into adult living. 
Practice teachers from area colleges were placed in the 
system. We had a championship team in basketball; the 
driver education program was continued. Students in the 
high school took the following tests: CEEB, NMSQT, 
PSAT, IQ, GATB, and others as needed. Visitations to the 
school were made by many area college and school repre- 
sentatives. Staff members have attended professional 
meetings and workshops. 

Each year the State Board of Education asserts its 
authority and places new regulations on school systems. 
The one that is coming into being and will have a great 
effect on Hatfield in both facility and financial matters is 
the teacher-pupil ratio requirement. If this becomes law, 
Hatfield will have three sections for every grade, through 
grade 8. Where to house these students when we now 
have a building problem is a good question. 

The Federal Government continues to play a role in 
the field of education causing a demand on school authori- 
ties. Most of the federal programs require volumes of 
paper work to substantiate the applications. Despite these 
demands, the Hatfield School Department has participated 
in the following: PL 89-10 Titltes I and II, PL 864 Titles 
III and V-A, PL 88-210 and PL 874. 



119 



The school department wishes to bring to your atten- 
tion the reimbursements that were received by the town 
on account of education. The 1969 budget has increased 
and the reasons for the increases, other than normal ex- 
penditures, are: comparable salary schedules, full imple- 
mentation of art and kindergarten programs, new bus 
contracts, normal inflation and progress in curriculum im- 
provement. 

This past June 1968, 42 students were graduated 
from Smith Academy and of this number 38 have gone on 
to further education. Seven students were graduated 
from Smith's Vocational School and 21 were scheduled to 
return in September 1968. Many adults have also attend- 
ed area schools for adult education courses. The Class of 
1968 presented a movie camera and 8mm projector to the 
high school as a graduating class gift. 

The rule regarding the entrance of pupils is as fol- 
lows : any child who attains the age of six during the year 
in which entrance to the first grade is sought may attend 
school beginning in September of that year. For example : 
A child having his sixth birthday on any day, including or 
between January 1, 1969 and Dcember 31, 1969, may enroll 
and attend school beginning September 1969. Any child 
who attains the age of five during the year in which en- 
trance to the kindergarten is sought may attend beginning 
in September of that year. 

It is the policy of the Hatfield School Department to 
hold regular sessions when it is practicable to operate the 
school buses. Parents are asked to use their own discre- 
tion as to the wisdom of sending their children to school 
on stormy mornings. In the event that it becomes neces- 
sary to cancel school sessions, the "No School Signal" will 
be broadcast over radio station WHMP starting at 6 a.m. 
and continuing through 8:30 a.m. The authorities of 



120 



WHMP request that parents not call the radio station for 
this information, but listen for the announcements. 

National Education Week was observed November 
12-15, 1968. Special times were set aside throughout the 
week, for private parent-teacher conferences. The schools 
held open house on Wednesday evening of that week. Edu- 
cation Week closed with the showing of the senior high 
school play entitled: "Butter on the Bacon." 

The bus routes were revised in September and the 
routes will be adhered to for the remainder of the year. 
A copy of the present routes follows this report. 

Released time for religious instruction was offered 
again this year. The following times are set aside each 
week so that pupils may benefit from religious instruction 
in denominations of their own choosing. Released time 
started on September 18, 1968 and will end on May 14, 
1969. 

Wednesday 10:45-11:30 Smith Academy students 
Wednesday 12:45- 1:30 Grades 6, 7, 8, and 9 
Wednesday 1 :50- 2 :40 Grades 2, 3, 4, and 5 

An open-door policy is a vital part of our community- 
centered schools. Our teachers are an integral part of the 
open-door policy and are willing to help any parent. Par- 
ents are invited to visit and see what and how their chil- 
dren learn in the classroom, but are requested to check 
through the principal's office first. 

For a more detailed report about our elementary and 
junior high schools, your attention is directed to Mrs. 
Breor's Principal's Report. 

As I write this report for the year 1968, I am struck 
with the fact that understanding the school system re- 



121 



quires more than the reading of a report for any given 
year. Each year is built upon the experience of the past 
and each report, to be fully understood, should be reviewed 
with both what has happened and what is planned and 
anticipated. The single most important factor continues 
to be the high school facilities and space, which in turn 
affect our accreditation and special rooms. One must also, 
at this time, anticipate a future addition to the elementary 
school which would include a kindergarten and library. The 
possibility of the addition of a cafeteria also might be wise 
so that the elementary gym could be used fully for phys- 
ical education and community activities. These matters 
should definitely not only be weighed heavily but action 
should be taken accordingly. 

May I, at this time, extend my appreciation for the 
cooperation and assistance rendered by the members of 
the school committee, to the town departments and towns- 
people, my appreciation for the cooperation which was re- 
ceived toward providing an education in keeping with the 
best interests of the students of Hatfield, and to the school 
department employees, my sincere thanks for their co- 
operation in meeting the educational needs of our chil- 
dren. 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI 
Superintendent of Schools 



122 



Bus Route 



Regular School Bus Schedule 



Elementary 



Run#l 



Bus leaves the high school, up School Street, down 
Prospect Street, up Bridge Street, left on Dwight 
Street, right on Elm Street, down Maple Street, down 
Main Street to Elementary School. 



Run #2 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, up Dwight 
Street, up Elm Street, down Main Highway to make 
first pickup, left on Linseed Road to Stoddard resi- 
dence, turn around, back down Linseed Road to Main 
Highway, left, down Main Highway to Harubin's 
Service Station. Bus turns around here, takes right 
at Wolfram's Garage, left down Pantry Road, down 
Main Highway, left at, and down Chestnut Street, 
down School Street, down Main Street, to Elementary 
School. 



Run #3 

Bus leaves the high school, to Bradstreet, to Whately 
town line, turns around, back down River Road, right 
at Bradstreet Cafe, to Main High Highway, left down 
Prospect Street, down Chestnut Street, down School 
Street to Elementary School. 



123 



Junior and Senior High Schools 

Run#l 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station to Bradstreet, to 
Whately town line, turns around, back down River 
Road, right at Bradstreet Cafe, to Main Highway, left 
down Prospect Street, down Chestnut Street, down 
School Street, to High School. 

Run #2 

Bus leaves the Bridge Street station, down Bridge 
Street, up Prospect Street, up Chestnut Street, right 
on Main Highway to Wolfram's Garage, left here and 
left again down Pantry Road, down Main Highway, 
left down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down Main 
Street, to High School. 

Run #3 

Bus leaves Bridge Street station, down Dwight Street, 
down Elm Street, down Maple Street, down Main 
Street, to High School. 

Times 

The buses will start the Junior and Senior High 
School runs at 7:20 and the Elementary runs at 7:55. 
The afternoon runs will start at 2 :21 for the Junior 
and Senior High Schools and 2:50 for the Elementary 
School. 

Vocational School Bus Run : 

Starting from the Whately-Hatfield town line on 
Route 5, proceeding south on West Street, left down 
Chestnut Street, down School Street, right and down 
Main Street, right and up Maple Street, up Elm 
Street, to Smith's Vocational School. Return will be 
the reverse. 



124 



Principal of the Elementary and 
Junior High Schools 



To the School Committee and the 
Superintendent of Schools : 

I wish to submit the thirteenth annual report as prin- 
cipal of the Center Junior High School and the Hatfield 
Elementary School. 

With Apollo 8 orbitting the moon, anticipated land- 
ings on the moon, unsettled conditions in our country and 
the world, we must from time to time take inventory to 
be sure that our curriculum and courses of study will pre- 
pare the students to face the challenges and problems 
which they will encounter in the future. They will be en- 
tering an unsettled world where "the thing, ,, "the happen- 
ing" and "the establishment" — words with entirely differ- 
ent connotations than Webster ever defined — are accepted 
terminology even in our schools-of-education at various 
universities. It's a world, we must understand, that would 
have us abandon all of the old establishment as inadequate 
and worthless. The immature, unknowledgeable, and in- 
experienced would have us destroy that which has proven 
to be worthwhile just to yield the right of way to some 
fantasy or whim of the imagination. They would have the 
controlling forces of our educational system in the hands 
of individuals who lack maturity, knowledge, and experi- 
ence — people who are filled with frustrations because they 
lack the essential elements that are necessary for con- 
structive thinking. 

Research and experimentation have provided us with 
a great many new materials and innovations that can be 



125 



successfully adopted by our school system, but these can- 
not fully replace "the tried-and-the-true." 

Our emphasis for these past few years has been in 
the fields of science and mathematics. In the government, 
industry, and education the inadequacies of the programs 
in these areas were the foremost issues discussed in the 
newspapers and other publications. But the people should 
know that the federal government has assisted the towns 
and cities with materials to supplement these existing pro- 
grams by providing funds under Title III. 

The creative arts have been given little priority or 
emphasis. Although they have always been taught, it is 
only recently that educators have become aware of the 
importance of these areas in the lives of the students. 

This September an art supervisor was added to our 
staff on a part-time basis. The supervisor meets with all 
the elementary classes and the Art Club for interested 
junior and senior high students. 

Our emphasis in the program is different from the 
program offered years ago. Then the program was very- 
exacting with the creativity of the pupils completely over- 
shadowed by the emphasis on learning basic skills and 
principles. Today we have schools-of -thought that would 
lead us to believe that complete uninhibited freedom of 
expression should be our purpose. This type of freedom 
can be an aimless pursuit with a waste of time, effort, and 
materials. We wish to develop the creative expression of 
each individual, but we also want to teach the students the 
basic principles of all facets of art. Art and music are not 
different from other areas of learning. We try to expose 
students to as many mediums as possible so that the 
program involves the students in a variety of activities. 
Throughout the year, visitors to our schools will find evi- 
dence of the students' work. Not all children are gifted, 



126 



but with a little direction and assistance the hidden talents 
of many come to the surface. 

Since the adoption of the Willis Commission Report 
by the Massachusetts Board of Education, certain changes 
have become mandatory. By 1973, every town and city in 
the state must offer kindergarten training for the five- 
year-olds. Though only half of this age group in the 
United States has an opportunity to attend kindergarten, 
most educators agree that kindergarten training should 
be an integral part of the elementary program. 

Fortunately, the Hatfield School Committee was able 
to provide the room and facilities for the opening of a 
kindergarten class this past September. By transferring 
our junior high music classes to the community rooms at 
the Memorial Town Hall a room was made available in the 
basement of the Center Junior High. Although this is not 
an ideal situation, it was the best answer under existing 
circumstances. 

The kindergarten classes are divided into two ses- 
sions taught by one teacher. The morning schedule is 
from 8:45-11:15, the afternoon session extends from 
12-2:30. This meets the state requirement of two and a 
half hours per session. 

Now that our kindergarten has been in operation for 
almost a half year, we can observe our goals and objec- 
tives develop through classroom activities. The questions 
most frequently asked about kindergarten are: "Isn't it 
professional babysitting? What is taught?" 

Any kindergarten class is equipped to give the chil- 
dren a variety of experiences they need to prepare for 
reading and writing and all the learning activities that 
will take place in the first grade. The program is rich in 
a number of learning experiences that help to build under- 



127 



standing. Children need to work and play by themselves, 
in small groups, and in large groups. They need the give- 
and-take of sharing objects and ideas with others. The 
kindergarten provides activities that build background in- 
formation through sharing ideas, solving problems, learn- 
ing concepts, and self expression. Activities include the 
development of visual perception and discrimination, 
noting differences of configuration, identifying colors, re- 
lating stories, grouping similar objects, oral communica- 
tion, sensory perception, and muscular coordination so 
that the child has control of himself before he begins to 
read and write. 

These children must not have a restricted program 
all day. They must have a chance to examine the resources 
in the classroom. Drawing, painting, singing, building, 
cutting, listening, talking, moving about, and sharing are 
part of every program. 

The kindergarten is well equipped with necessary ma- 
terials and equipment for an adequate program. Of course, 
we cannot say the facilities are completely satisfactory. 
To meet the state requirements the room for such a pro- 
gram should be much larger. The classroom should be 
located at the elementary school. 

Our anticipated enrollment for next year's kinder- 
garten class is 61 according to October first census figures. 
There is a possibility that the number will increase if 
families move into town. The number of anticipated pupils 
for kindergarten is much too large for one teacher. Ideal- 
ly, this should be divided into three sections. This would 
mean more facilities and another teacher. A class of thirty 
kindergarten pupils in the present room would be impos- 
sible for both teacher and pupils. 

The junior high music classes would be better at the 
junior high school. Coming to and from the community 
rooms takes time that should be devoted to class work. 



128 



One problem at all levels is to provide materials and 
programs geared to the developmental level of the student. 
We cannot push a child beyond a level before he is ready. 

All learning depends upon the stage of development 
and ability of individuals to assimilate and evaluate the 
knowledge to which he has been exposed. Over-placement 
is a problem. Parents feel that all children can learn equal- 
ly if they really apply themselves. This is not true. Most 
children would do better if they could. We must provide 
all students with programs suited to their stage of devel- 
opment so that all may experience success and not failure. 

In the elementary reading program we shall supple- 
ment the basic program with a stronger phonetic ap- 
proach. These materials will be used at all levels. By 
doing this, we hope to give the talented and gifted a head 
start in reading and the slower individuals a firmer foun- 
dation so that there will be fewer with reading problems. 
Of course, there will always be some who can benefit from 
the remedial reading program. This has been a tremen- 
dous help to the pupils who need individual assistance with 
their reading weaknesses. 

The Greater Cleveland Social Science Program was 
introduced in September. This program will replace the 
social studies program from one through nine eventually. 
This year it was introduced in Grades 3, 4, 6, and 8. Next 
year we hope to cover the other classes. This program 
should provide us with a unified curriculum in social sci- 
ence. The concepts will be developed in sequential order 
and will include geography, history, economics, political 
science, and sociology. 

Many supplemental and enrichment materials have 
been added to each classroom at both the elementary and 
junior high schools. At the elementary we lack a central 



129 



library which should be the center of activity in any 
school. Therefore, all volumes must go into individual 
classroom collections. These materials are used to supple- 
ment basic texts and for individual reading. The accessi- 
bility of these materials should encourage children to read 
more. 

These are just a few highlights of the year. We know 
in every area, including physical education, equipment and 
materials have been added to meet the needs of the indi- 
viduals. Without proper tools and materials, learning 
would be hampered. We cannot be extravagant, but we 
must have the essentials. 

May I, in closing, thank the Hatfield School Commit- 
tee, the Superintendent of Schools, the staff, custodians, 
pupils, and interested citizens who helped to make this 
year a rewarding one. 



Respectfully submitted, 

(MRS.) DOROTHY BREOR 

Principal 



130 



School Health 



To the Superintendent and 
School Committee of Hatfield: 



I wish to submit my annual report, the 17th, as the 
school nurse of Hatfield. 

Parents have a responsibility, as well as an oppor- 
tunity, to teach their young children about healthful liv- 
ing. The child's development of sound health behavior pat- 
terns and attitudes should get a good start in the home 
before he starts school. Parents' responsibilities for their 
child's basic health needs include providing a well chosen 
diet, good habits of hygiene, and the correction of remedi- 
able defects with the aid of the family physician and den- 
tist. An ill child should remain at home for his own sake 
and that of his classmates. Parents should realize the im- 
portance of complying with this policy. 

Physical examinations have been completed. Defects 
that were found were brought to the attention of the par- 
ents. It is gratifying to report that the number of over- 
weight children has decreased considerably. Dental de- 
fects are also at a minimum. 

The vision test was given to 613 pupils with 37 in 
need of correction. The Pure Tone hearing test was given 
to 610 pupils with 7 reporting for further care. 

As a prophylactic measure, flu vaccine was given to 
23 members of the teaching staff. 



131 



The Tine Tuberculin test was given in May to chil- 
dren in grades one and twelve. A total of 103 were tested 
with no positive reactors. 

Adult booster injections for Diphtheria and Tetanus 
were given to 28 members of the Senior Class. 

Communicable Diseases reported during the year are 
as follows : 

Scarlet Fever — 8 Chicken Pox — 7 Mumps — 1 

We are pleased to report that all children attending 
our schools are properly immunized against Diphtheria, 
Tetanus, Whooping Cough, Polio and Measles. This is in 
compliance with the new law passed last December, mak- 
ing it a mandatory procedure. 

A mumps vaccine clinic was held in December. The 
vaccine was supplied by the state to be given to the Junior 
High group. There were 40 pupils who never had the dis- 
ease and received the vaccine. 

Registration for incoming first graders took place in 
April. Fifty-five pupils were enrolled. In May, 48 pupils 
were enrolled for kindergarten. 

Census of all children between the ages of 5 and 16 
was completed in October, as was the census of physically 
handicapped children. 

My sincerest appreciation is extended to the school 
physicians, school officials, teachers, and parents for their 
assistance and cooperation in the school health program. 



Respectfully submitted, 

LUCILLE H. GODEK, R.N. 

132 



School Lunch 



The Hot Lunch Program is well received by the stu- 
dent body at both cafeterias. Approximately 565 meals 
are prepared daily by a most competent staff headed by 
Mrs. Winifred Betsold, manager. Other members of the 
staff are Mrs. Hazel Roberts, assistant manager, Mrs. 
Wanda Shea, Mrs. Bertha Kosakowski, Mrs. Mary Va- 
chula, Mrs. Phyllis Kuzontkoski, Mrs. Mary Winters, and 
Mrs. Helen Rudy. Substitutes are used as needed. 

Each day the program serves a "Type A" lunch that 
meets the requirements of the National School Lunch 
Program. This consists of, as a minimum, two ounces 
cooked, lean meat, poultry, or fish, or two ounces of cheese, 
one egg or one-half cup cooked dry beans or peas, or four 
tablespoons of peanut butter or an equivalent quantity of 
a combination of two of these items, served in a main dish 
or in a main dish and one other menu item ; three-fourths 
cup serving of two or more vegetables or fruits, or both ; 
one sliced enriched bread or the equivalent ; two teaspoons 
butter; one-half pint whole, unflavored milk. No dessert 
is required, but we include one with every hot lunch 
served. Special attention is given to include adequate serv- 
ings of Vitamin C rich food daily and Vitamin A food 
twice a week. With the above, the student gets one-third 
of his daily nutritional requirements. Milk and cookies 
are served to the kindergarten students. 

The cafeteria personnel once again attended the state- 
sponsored School Lunch Conference this year. National 
School Lunch Week was observed in October 1968. 

Equipment and utensils, as needed, have been pur- 
chased for both cafeterias. Maintenance and repair pro- 
grams were also carried out. 



133 



The menus of the school lunch program were pub- 
lished in the daily newspaper and were also posted in the 
classrooms. State and Federal Aid in the form of cash 
reimbursements and food donations make it possible to 
offer the hot lunch to students for 25 cents, and the 
amount of food value received for this price is still the 
best bargain one can get. The elementary and junior hgh 
pupils are supervised by the homeroom teachers, with 
over-all supervision by the principal, Mrs. Dorothy Breor. 
The high school students are supervised by the high school 
teachers with over-all supervision by the high school prin- 
cipal, Mr. John A. Skarzynski. 

The cafeteria staff should be commended for the man- 
ner in which they have carried out the lunch program. 
A high percentage of our students participate in the pro- 
gram and the quality and variety of food offered is ex- 
cellent. 

The financial account of the lunch program can be 
found in the town accountant's report which appears in 
another section of this town report. 

The following is an accounting of the number of 
lunches served during the past year: 



134 





Days 
Lunch Served 


No. of 
Lunches Served 


January 


21 


11,710 


February 


16 


9,110 


March 


20 


11,253 


April 


16 


9,001 


May 


21 


11,585 


June 


12 


6,435 


September 


19 


10,883 


October 


22 


12,636 


November 


17 


9,774 


December 


14 


7,825 



178 



100,212 



Respectfully submitted, 



JOHN A. SKARZYNSKI 



Director, Hatfield School Lunch 



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137 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 1968 



Regular Day School 

Appropriation for support $304,700.00 

Total Expenditures for support 304,700.00 

Expenditures from PL 874 17,525.16 

Expenditures from PL 864 738.85 

Expenditures from PL 89-10 4,709.74 

Expenditures from PL 88-210 506.00 



Total Expenditures $328,179.75 



Credits : Reimbursements to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth of Massachusetts : 
General School Fund (Chap.70) $ 44,307.03 
Transportation 9,545.21 



Total reimbursement for regular day school 

to Town of Hatfield from Commonwealth 53,852.24 



Credits : Reimbursement to School Committee 



from Federal Government : 






Federal Law — PL 874 


$ 11,074.00 




Federal Law — PL 864 


971.95 




Federal Law — PL 89-10 


3,359.00 




Federal Law — PL 88-210 


506.00 




Total reimbursement to School Committee 




received from Federal Government 


15,910.95 



138 



Vocational Tuition and Transportation 

Vocational Tuition & Transportation : 

Appropriation for support $ 24,047.40 

Unexpended balance, returned 

to Surplus Cash 4,553.14 

Total Support $ 19,494.36 



Credits: Reimbursement to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
Vocational Tuition and Transportation : 
Vocational Transportation $ 900.00 



Total reimbursement for Vocational Tuition 
and Transportation to Town of Hatfield 
from Commonwealth $ 900.00 



139 



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140 



HATFIELD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL BUDGET ESTIMATE 

1969 



Function : 




1000 


Administration 


$ 10,345.00 


2000 


Instruction 


302,998.00 


3000 


Other School Services 


23,780.00 


4000 


Operation & Maintenance of Plant 


38,790.00 


5000 


Fixed Charges 


570.00 


6000 


Community Services 


1,000.00 


7000 


Acquisition of Equipment 
Unclassified — Special Class Tuition 


2,425.00 




and Transportation 
TOTAL BUDGET ESTIMATE 


1,000.00 




$380,908.00 



1969 BUDGET ESTIMATE 



Administration — 1000 



Superintendent's Salary $ 


5,300.00 


Superintendent's Clerk 


3,360.00 


Substitute Clerk 


200.00 


Census 


110.00 


Superintendent's Office Expenses 


350.00 


Superintendent's Expenses 


300.00 


Superintendent's Out of State Travel 


650.00 


Co-operative School Service Center 


75.00 


Total 


$ 10,345.00 



141 



Instruction — 2000 

Elementary Principal's Salary 8,042.00 

Elementary Office Expenses 50.00 

Elementary Principal's Expenses 50.00 

Junior High Principal's Salary 4,021.00 

Junior High Office Expenses 50.00 

Junior High Principal's Expenses 50.00 

Secondary Principal's Salary 9,400.00 

Secondary Office Expenses 200.00 

Secondary Principal's Expenses 150.00 

Graduation 350.00 

Research and Development 1,000.00 

Head Start Program 1,000.00 

Title III 600.00 

Music Salary 3,700.00 

Music Salary — Pianist 100.00 

Art Salary 2,550.00 

Art Supplies 1,000.00 

Miscellaneous 125.00 
Elementary Salaries 108,220.00 

Penmanship 540.00 

Salaries — Handicapped Children 500.00 

Elementary Instructional Supplies 4,500.00 

ETV Membership 325.00 

Elemmentary Staff educational trip 150.00 

Out of state — teacher travel 0.00 

Junior High Salaries 66,420.00 

Physical Education 2,200.00 

Junior High Instructional Supplies 2,800.00 

Junior High Staff educational trip 150.00 

Out of state — teacher travel 0.00 

Secondary Salaries 71,250.00 

Secondary Instructional Supplies 2,400.00 

Driver Education 550.00 

Senior High Staff educational trip 150.00 

Out of state — teacher travel 0.00 
Girls' Physical Education Instructor 2,400.00 



142 



Elementary Textbooks 


2,400.00 


Junior High Textbooks 


1,500.00 


Secondary Textbooks 


1,400.00 


Elem. Library books & supplies 


200.00 


Jr. High Library books & supplies 


500.00 


Secondary Library books & supplies 


630.00 


Elementary AVA materials 


100.00 


Junior High AVA materials 


125.00 


Secondary AVA materials 


250.00 


Contracted Services — Guidance 


400.00 


Supplies and Materials 


400.00 


Travel and Meetings 


100.00 


Total 


302,998.00 



Other School Services — 3000 



Nurse's Salary 


3,500.00 


Health Supplies and Materials 


130.00 


School Nurse's Expenses 


100.00 


Elementary Field Trips 


200.00 


Junior High Field Trips 


200.00 


Secondary Field Trips 


200.00 


Pupil Transportation 


16,500.00 


Athletic Transportation 


1,300.00 


Police — Athletic Contracted 




Services 


250.00 


Athletic Expenses & Awards 


1,400.00 



Total 23,780.00 



143 



Operation and Maintenance of Plant — 4000 



Elementary Custodial Salaries 


5,800.00 


Elementary Custodial Substitute 


200.00 


Elementary Custodial Supplies 


2,200.00 


Junior High Custodial Salaries 


5,200.00 


Junior High Custodial Substitute 


200.00 


Junior High Custodial Supplies 


1,300.00 


Secondary Custodial Salaries 


4,800.00 


Secondary Custodial Substitute 


200.00 


Secondary Custodial Supplies 


750.00 


Town Hall Custodial Supplies 


200.00 


Elementary Fuel 


2,700.00 


Junior High Fuel 


2,000.00 


Secondary Fuel 


1,400.00 


Elementary Electricity 


3,400.00 


Elementary Telephone 


185.00 


Junior High Electricity 


575.00 


Junior High Telephone 


190.00 


Secondary Electricity 


550.00 


Secondary Telephone 


270.00 


Alterations — unclassified 


100.00 


School Street School Maintenance 




and Repair 


100.00 


Elementary Maintenance & Repair 


2,850.00 


ETV Maintenance 


110.00 


Junior High Maintenance & Repair 


2,350.00 


Secondary Maintenance & Repair 


310.00 


Maint. — Classroom typewriters 


450.00 


Maintenance — Reserve 


0.00 


School Vehicles 


400.00 



Total 



38,790.00 



144 



Fixed Charges — 5000 

Liability Insurance 70.00 

Athletic Insurance 500.00 

Rental of Land, etc. 0.00 



Total 570.00 

Community Services — 6000 

Community Services 1,000.00 



Total 1,000.00 

Acquisition of Equipment — 7300 

New Equipment 2,425.00 



Total 2,425.00 



Unclassified 

Special Class Students — Tuition 

and Transportation 1,000.00 



Total 1,000.00 



TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION $380,908.00 



NON-APPROPRIATED FEDERAL FUNDS 

Contractual 

Title II, 89-10 Funds 0.00 

Voc. Ed. Act, 1963 PL 88-210 400.00 

Title III, 89-10 Funds 0.00 



145 



REIMBURSEMENT — ANTICIPATED 

Transportation Aid, Chap. 71, Sec. 72 $ 10,800.00 

PL 874 — Available and Anticipated 22,000.00 

PL 864 — Available and Anticipted 1,200.00 

Voc. Ed. Act, 1963, PL 88-210 400.00 

State School Aid Chapter 70 — 1969 45,000.00 

Total $ 79,400.00 

Total Appropriation 380,908.00 

Available & Estimated Reecipts 79,400.00 



Estimated Net Cost to Town $301,508.00 



146 



HATFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

1968 - 1969 



1968 

Sept. 3 Staff meeting — 9 :30 a.m. 

Sept. 4 Schools open — full sessions 

Oct. 28 Teachers' Convention — no school 

Nov. 11 Veterans' Day — no school 

Nov. 27 Thanksgiving recess 

Schools close — full sessions 

Dec. 2 Schools reopen — full sessions 

Dec. 20 Christmas recess 

Schools close — full sessions 

1969 

Jan. 2 Schools reopen — full sessions 

Feb. 14 Schools close for winter vacation 

Feb. 24 Schools reopen — full sessions 

April 4 Good Friday — no school 

April 18 Schools close for spring vacation 

April 28 Schools reopen — full sessions 

May 26 Memorial Day — no school 

June 20 High School graduation 

(184 days) All pupils dismissed at close of day with 
report cards 

June 23 Teachers will report until closing details of 

year are completed 



147 



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